EVE Online announces plans to start retiring items from its in-game store

    
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Tough luck, no buy.
The problem facing EVE Online’s in-game store, according to the most recent development update, was that it was stuffed full of cosmetic items and was thus difficult to navigate. So what’s the solution? Provide better navigation tools? Offer more robust searches and groupings? Or just retire all of the things that have been in the store for a while and ensure that anything new would be retired after a short span of time as well, thus pressuring you to buy it right away? That last one is the one with the link and it requires the least work, so take a guess.

Various sales will be held over the next few month as the team retires more or less all of the cosmetic skins in the shop right now; future skins will have a lifespan of three months before they are also retired. There’s the promise that some of these items may return at various points in the future for seasonal packs, but obviously, the emphasis is on buying any skins immediately if you want them in the future. Which, we must concede, will definitely make the store easier to navigate.

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Lateris

It probably is just their beginning move to get rid of avatar apparels.

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Danny Smith

Ah. The eververse school of dynamite fishing for whales.

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Schmidt.Capela

It doesn’t affect me because there’s little chance I would ever go back to EVE (it would take the release of a PvE version of it, but we all know hell would freeze over first). But this kind of sales strategy has the opposite effect on me; if something is time-limited, produced in a limited run, or otherwise has its availability artificially restricted to increase demand, I will refuse to ever spend money on it. If I ever feel like I must get it I will resort to bootleg or pirate copies.

It’s part of the reason I will stop playing MMOs any time they do a time-limited event, and might even leave the game altogether if it has too many of those (as has happened before).

harbinger_kyleran
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harbinger_kyleran

Nothing spurs sales more than the threat something may go away.

It’s OK, I can still live without a monocle.

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zeko_rena

Guess they could make good investments, buy them from the store hold on to them for AGES then flick them on the market

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Sally Bowls

Although my guess is that the second to last sentence is somewhat more important than the last. E.g., the wikipedia entry for Disney Vault also has a link to “artificial scarcity.” Limited time offer! Going away in 90 days! buy! buy! buy!

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Armsbend

You know the Disney vault is something from their early cartoon days as well. I recently discovered that they would put all of their movies – Snow White, Dumbo, Bambi, etc – in the theater every 7 years. The idea that a new crop of young viewers would want to see it as well.

So I suppose they learned the idea of scarcity in media likely before anyone. Now it is artificial like you said because there is hardly any distribution cost.

Earlier I said I don’t fall for this but Lady and the Tramp came online the other day and I was internally like, “Finally!” But they called it a special edition at $20 with no additional features so I thought better of it.

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Armsman

IDK – the best Disney marketing BS was them selling their Classic films circa 1998-1999 with the tag phrase – “Available for the last time this Century…”

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Armsbend

I used to fall for these types of schemes. I get embarrassed when I think about it.