DDO cracks down on exploiters, players cry… ‘honeypot’?

    
12
Better not be a cheater in Dungeon and Dragons Online. Last week, Standing Stone Games announced that it was cracking down on players who took advantage of a specific exploit.

“We are in the process of engaging in targeted disciplinary action against characters and accounts that engaged in a recent exploit that allowed them to complete Sagas and get rewards for them repeatedly without re-running the Saga,” Community Manager Cordovan wrote. “Players who engaged in this activity will see one of several things happen to their accounts: We will be issuing temporary game bans, and in some cases will be removing the benefit they gained through this exploit. For our most repeat or malicious offenders, we will be removing the characters that took frequent advantage of this exploit, in addition to more restrictive bans.”

Some players, however, are crying foul. In a thread titled Teach SSG A Lesson, some DDO gamers allege and hypothesize that SSG intentionally inserted an “exploit detector” and then posted “explicit instructions” on how to carry out the exploit, rather than fixing it. The words “honeypot” and “entrapment” crop up multiple times.

Of course, other players are acknowledging the absurdity of those arguments, as it doesn’t appear SSG posted instructions, and it wouldn’t be “entrapment” even if it had. Just another day in MMO land.

Source: Official forums. Thanks, Rick!
Advertisement

No posts to display

newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Crowe

Yeah, seriously. So what if it’s a honeypot? It’s an exploit and that’s pretty obvious. For those that stumbled across it and maybe checked a second time, I’d suspend for 3 days (slap on the wrist). For the heavy exploiters though? Ban them.

Reader
McGuffn

The only plausible reason for posting instructions would be as a Do Not Do.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

Honeypots don’t catch the innocent.

Reader
Robert Mann

I’m all for those players being noted around the MMO industry, and subsequently banned from purchasing titles that require payment unless they come forward and make an agreement on proper behavior and liability.

Simply put, those saying such things are either exploiters or would-be-exploiters. They offer negative value to everyone else who might play a game, unless the game has absolutely zero interactions in any manner from direct to things like an AH (at which point who cares.) So for any game where there is an expectation of interaction with players on a relatively level field… the game is better off without those people. Regardless of revenue or anything else they might ‘cite’ in their defense.

I’m up for that being applied to the truly toxic, per each studio’s definition as they apply it, as well. Consequences make the barbaric behave… for the rest of us we have things like manners.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

Yeah.. if I tell someone how to poison someone and they then do it, am I at fault for telling them how or are they at fault for ACTUALLY doing it? You know what they say “You can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make it drink”.

Their stupidity is their OWN responsibility, irrespective of what information was available to them. At they end of the day they CHOSE to make use of the exploit so have noone to blame but themselves.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

Of course, other players are acknowledging the absurdity of those arguments, as it doesn’t appear SSG posted instructions, and it wouldn’t be “entrapment” even if it had.

It would have been unethical and disruptive to the game if SSG had posted instructions for the exploit, or even merely delayed fixing it in order to see who would make use of the exploit, though. That is a kind of mindset I really don’t want to see in any game I play; devs should remind players that they are monitoring the use of exploits every time a new one appears, and never delay the fix to one.

(And this is somewhere I really differentiate cheats and exploits. I find it perfectly fine for the dev to delay acting on cheats and bots in order to catch more cheaters and make it harder to determine how exactly the devs are detecting cheats.)

On the other hand I don’t think SSG willfully inserted an exploit into their game. Little to gain, and a lot to lose.

ultorius
Reader
ultorius

Realy?Entrapment?Those guys clearly cheated and now they complain about it?And its not like they drop the hammer on them.Temporary suspensions and in some cases removing the benefit they gained by cheating?Give those guys (the devs) a break.They are one of the few companies trying to sustain a true mmorpg that was created in 2006 and i doubt its making a tonne of money .Meanwhile candy crash is making 2m per day and they dont have to deal with all that XD

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Darthbawl

The all-20-d20 was cute. Wished I had a few of those back in the day. :P

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Darthbawl

I’ve been playing games for ~3 decades now (ugh!) and these current excuses from the exploiters are some of the best yet. I can’t say I have heard of this angle being used before to deflect the [*cough* alleged *cough*] exploiting. Plenty of fresh excuses still out there. :P

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

How would entrapping people benefit SSG at all?

Reader
Utakata

They are probably using Jones’ Razor. That is all things being equal, the most complicated explanation is the correct one. A “philosophical” methodology of reductionism put forward by a one “reverend” Alex of Jones. Or, tl,dr: /tinfoil hat. o.O