Fortnite: Downtime, weapon swapping, week 10 challenge leaks, and Ninja’s Vegas tourney

    
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A jetpack could have prevented this.

Epic Games is super sorry about all the Fortnite downtime earlier this month, so sorry it spent 11 seconds talking about it in its latest dev video, which is less time that the rockin’ video intro took. The studio also says that it’s keeping an eye on weapon swapping changes (it already rolled back some of them) and that it’s still working on swap animations and tinkering on various quality-of-life issues, including trap identification.

Meanwhile, several sites are covering what they believe to be leaks about the game’s Week 10 Challenges; players are looking at seven new weeklies, among them headshot damage counts, chest-searching in multiple named locations, and skydiving through floating rings. Can’t say as I’ve ever had a quest to go skydiving in an MMO before.

Finally, ESPN has a piece up on popular streamer Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, whose Vegas event at the new Luxor e-sports arena charged competitors $75 to come try to kill him (winners took home $2500). E-sports are getting weirder.

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Sally Bowls

https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/23/17271106/youtube-anniversary-13-years-old-teenager

YouTube’s first video — an 18-second clip with over 48 million views, not a whole lot of action, and exactly one genital innuendo — was uploaded 13 years ago today.

P.s.: yes I know I am old and all the cool kids Twitch.

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Sally Bowls

http://www.businessinsider.com/ninja-tyler-blevins-twitch-subscribers-fortnite-drake-youtube-2018-3

This new idea of stream creation as the event seems like a fresh idea. Although making a half million a year from your bedroom has its appeal, especially if you can stay dressed.

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blahlbinoa .

With Activision and possibly EA coming in soon to make a bigger Battle Royale game (with more money and devs backing it) we can probably see a faster Battle Royale bubble crash than MOBA’s crash. The bubble is starting to bloat and if the CoD doesn’t have a Battle Royale mode, then I give this another 3 years until something comes along and Fortnite will be another LoL. Once popular but left to the wayside for the next new thing that everyone wants to watch.

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Sally Bowls

There will be a peak; something else will be the new hotness. But the question is whether it settles down like LoL (still a massive, enviable success) or continues to fade away to nearly nothing.

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Sorenthaz

The event actually sounds like it was pretty cool. A 14 year-old kid managed to win one of the games, and I think it’s a good example of why Fortnite is alluring – because you never know who’s going to win, even when some insanely good players are in it. Ninja apparently also broke his record viewers-wise to get like 678k somehow.

‘course the question is still how long will this last, and whether or not it’s just a fad or if it’ll actually become the next WoW/LoL of its genre.

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rafael12104

I’m betting it is a fad, BUT that doesn’t mean it isn’t fun and to be honest could lead to other things.

It might be weird but it draws viewers and I like the premise of challengers taking on a Twitch “pro” for fun and money.

One thing that I keep seeing that is becoming more and more obvious, the Twitch/Youtube generation is getting stronger and stronger. Suddenly, it’s not about watching programming, but about creating programming. And there is money on the table.

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Sorenthaz

Well, I think another thing is that this is attracting kids. It’s essentially attracting the next generation of kids that watched/played Minecraft some years back. Part of the reason Ninja and Fortnite YouTubers are so big is because they attract a ton of kids which has been a fairly untapped audience so far. And kids have a chance to win these games, too, and that’s part of the allure to it as I already mentioned.

So it’s very possible it could die out if not managed properly, i.e. if Epic does stupid crap that kills the skill ceiling and turns off the big movers in the community (i.e. Ninja and other big name streamers/YouTubers with a legion of kids following them).

Also one Twitch streamer I watch regularly-ish known as Neace pointed out that the Ninja Vegas event was a lot like a poker tournament where folks buy in and then compete for cash prizes and stuff. That would actually potentially serve as a better ‘esport’ model for Fortnite to follow than doing something like actually trying to make a tryhard competitive league or whatever where all 100 people will just end up playing super careful/scared.