Hands-on with Bless Reborn at Neowiz’s San Francisco media reveal

As you probably have heard, there was a Bless influencer event this week, with a couple of media and a smattering of MMO streamers in attendance. The leak of the price points happened soon before we went in, but none of the people in attendance, devs or streamers, really seemed fazed by it. Most people seemed ready to have a good time.

For someone like me, who was initially blown away by Bless circa 2011, the game had fallen off my radar, especially after the game’s rocky trip to Russia and initial Korean release. The western build-up for me has felt like a big PR push, with the pricing model dangled like a feature that people actually should be excited about. Basic questions like, “How does endgame work?” were easier to find on Reddit, Steam, and fansites than any of the PR I was reading. I was concerned, to say the least, but things like “tame almost any mob!” and “100v100” battles intrigued me. Though nothing I saw is probably going to change any core fans’ mind, it may be useful to those on the fence.

Selling points

While the leak had some basic information on the price points, it didn’t have the fine details on what was in the $200 founder’s option. The press event also lacked in specifics beyond the mention of 90 days of subscription, lots of premium currency, customer service where they’ll actually look at your ticket, and a bunch of pet/mount skins.

Mounts and pet skins don’t seem terribly exciting to me, but this is also a game where everyone is a pet class. In fact, there’ll be about 660 potential tameables, and nearly anything can be tamed (I was told the biggest “you can’t tame that” rule is mobs in dungeons because it may mess with scripted scenarios).

The taming system is pretty easy too. Use the right consumable and you get a minigame where you strike spacebar at the right time to hit a moving mark on a meter. Do this a few times before the timer runs out and your tame is successful. Neat. It’s no Dragon’s Prophet where you had to rodeo a dragon, but it’s visually different from other taming minigames.

Then there’s the reworked combat. It feels like a cross between TERA and Guild Wars 2. I love the former, and the latter isn’t terrible. The combos I saw for my level 37 character were less like combos than like choosing which button you’re going to press two times next: R, T, or Y. Some are cool, like the guardian knocking its target into the air before slamming it back down, but it felt like less of a choice than a requirement, as the knock up option (the Y button) only lead to the knockdown button (also Y). Combined with different stances, combat could get pretty deep, though my experience felt more like a system of reinforced cycles than truly open combat options.

But what is this game at the end of the day? I’ve seen several commenters get excited about it, especially given the Pokemon-esque taming point and gorgeous visuals (note: there’s forced PvP, but supposedly lots of ways to avoid it, like drinking a potion from the game shop that turns off your pvp that I was told lasts for 20 minutes at the moment).

It might not sound like much to those of us steeped in the MMO genre, but great visuals and simple sounding gameplay are enough to get even non-gamers curious about an MMO. The problem, of course, is that MMOs are such huge collections of interacting systems. It’s not just a character creator, nor taming, nor raiding, nor PvP. It’s all of those working in a shared, persistent world.

This was one of the points stressed to me by Chief Creative Officer Jangchoel Rhee, Senior Combat Designer Seongil Ma, Executive Producer Sungjin Ko, and Advisor (and personal translator for our meeting) Jake Kim. Through Kim, I was told that despite what I’d seen and heard from the international Bless community, the developers consider the game to be a PvPvE game. This, it seems, is why PvP cannot be taken away from the equation. And I get that. If you design outdoor combat for a PvE game, it should play differently from one where you assume someone is going to jump out of a bush and stab you at any moment.

And that is something anyone who’s interested in Bless needs to consider: There will be PvP moments. While I mentioned that PvE games seem to do well in the west, the Neowiz developers noted that there’s room for a good PvP one. There’s clearly competition, especially from non-MMO PvP games like Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds, but MMO PvP is different, and Neowiz wanted to tackle that kind of game.

But why should we trust the company given its current record? I was told the developers felt that the lessons they learned from their past missteps helped them correct the game’s stability, combat, and UI. When I mentioned our previous interview with Game director Jae-hoon Jeon and how Neowiz didn’t feel gamers of different cultures would “demand different sorts of experiences,” the present developers affirmed that they had changed course. Not only was the monetization system changed again (the team has been careful in trying to avoid ArcheAge’s mistake of trying to build a game around a changed monetization system), but the difficulty for western players has been tiered. Previously, the game was more uniform in difficulty, so easing players into that difficulty sounds wiser.

However, more important is the idea that Early Access is supposed to be when the developers and player base communicate. I heard several times throughout the day’s event, from devs and PR, that the team wanted feedback. That’s something you players will really be able to test. Is the game really PvPvE? Is it really not pay-to-win? Do choices in combat really feel weighty? When the game hits Early Access, you can test this. Make your voice heard. See if Neowiz is working for that optional subscription. If the game “launches” but the team seems to be ignoring feedback, well, Bless will sadly be joining other disappointing EA games.

In-game action

Before my interview, I got to jump into Bless for a bit. The build we played on was on the US servers (based in Virginia), and it was certainly early access material, with bad translations, voice acting scripts that hadn’t been checked for comprehension, and broken tutorials. One idea that I liked about Bless is a basic, separate MMO-check tutorial, where the game tests if you know how to use WASD and combat systems. It’s far from finished and I was told to leave it be, but from what little I saw, it could be a good idea for someone who is new to the genre.

The proper newbie experience, however, was fairly standard stuff. If you’ve played a AAA fantasy MMO in the past 10 years that had voice acting, this’ll all be familiar. The beast race is cool, and tiny people are adorable, and water elves sound like a cool idea (I just wish they were more water than elf). We don’t have a sneaky melee type and there’s only one healer at launch, an issue many at the event lamented.

However, as MassivelyOP readers know, Neowiz has been adamant about PvP being a core part of the game’s identity. I was even told that the game isn’t a PvP game but a PvPvE game. The problem was, nothing at the event involved PvP. At all. Not only did I not see it as an option, but several streamers complained about the lack of it, especially as many were Black Desert players at some point, if not fans.

This is problematic, not only because we were told that PvP is supposed to be inherently linked with the PvE system, but because it’s supposed to be a feature that makes the game stand out, along with the lore and taming system.

The taming system is actually problem number two. None of the demos focused on taming. The ten minutes I spent in the proper newbie experience didn’t push me into that direction, and it sounded like few people explored it. Our core gameplay was PvE today, but didn’t include the game’s most unique PvE feature.

While taming sounds cool on paper, I just didn’t get to do enough with it at the event to be sold on it. Despite the fact that player-to-player trading won’t be in because the developers fear “black market” repercussions, there are ways to package some tameables and sell them on the auction house, as I had some in-game wrapping paper that would have done that. Having tameables be mounts and pets is cool, and some trading is nice too, but there aren’t any Pokemon-style pet battles, which even World of Warcraft has (though I was told they could implement it in the future).

While some readers are probably aware of how annoyed I get about demos that don’t properly demonstrate our genre, Neowiz did bring a demo that had group play, which I jumped into after my interview.

Press and streamers were in a simple dungeon that showed off the combos I’ve previously mentioned. The tab targetting is a little annoying, as many times I’d use an ability thinking it’d hit a nearby target, only for my character to chase a foe I was trying to unclick. Combat is telegraphed, and the effects are rather quick, but kind of fun. Again, huge TERA vibes, and that’s a good thing in my opinion. But MMOs aren’t about raw combat, and our demo did one thing that many don’t: It made us work together.

We could feel how important each class role was, especially with the loss of a main tank or healer, as death put you at the start of the dungeon but behind a gate so you can’t zerg encounters (unless you use premium currency every 15 minutes to self-resurrect in combat). In fact, one of our streamers wandered away from the healer station at the very start of a fight, leaving me to play tank and heals on two machines at once, and poorly at that. The characters seemed geared better than average, so we were able to pull it off with button jamming on my end, but it did enforce the idea that we needed each other.

What I wasn’t prepared for was the dungeons’ traps system. Traps seemed rather obvious, like grates being needle traps and poisonous gas being, well, poisonous, but they’re not minor things, especially for non-tanks. I saw our DPS instantly crumble from them, though sadly the traps don’t seem to affect NPCs. Another missed opportunity seems to come from the inability for any class to disable them. One streamer claimed otherwise, but sadly some of the streamers were apparently having fun trying to sow misinformation (not everyone who was present is part of the emissary program).

Having group content that required coordination before end-game was nice, and would have been especially good for non-MMO vets. Enough of the people who were present today were vets who enjoyed flexing their MMO muscles. Some of them even represent some of you, saying things like, “I like grindy games I don’t have to think about,” or “I like automated systems so I can run the game while I work.” That being said, despite what you might hear from some of their channels, there are causes to be concerned with Bless‘ upcoming Early Access.

Awaiting the dawn

Early access is slated for May 28th. Hopefully by then, the game’s user experience will be cleaner. The “mount” button will hopefully be translated better, as it means something more like “equip.” I don’t think the voice acting scripts (the acting isn’t terrible from what I heard) can be fixed by then. You’ll be in PvE mode for a bit, and maybe even try out an MMO-training tutorial just for kicks or with a new MMO-fan in the making, fingers crossed. The game should be steering you towards taming cool stuff and PvP, but maybe those will be more memorable because they’re not front and center.

Neowiz has a lot to overcome, and I don’t just mean its PvP priority when the western MMO market feels like it favors the PvE game, or at least non-open world, forced PvP MMOs. When I asked what the team’s done that might put a worried player at ease after Bless‘ current bumpy ride, they mentioned the UI changes, combat improvement, and localizing the difficulty. I was hoping to get some good numbers, or hear a specific story about a player suggestion that worked, but it didn’t materialize.

The team isn’t ignorant about the market, the MMO genre history, or the game(s) they’re being compared to. After all, they also work with Epic Games and help put Fortnite into Korean PC cafes. I even overheard one of the developers tell a streamer that the Research and Development team was looking into Battle Royale as an option for Bless, though the developers I interviewed said anything like that would come after release. They did seem to like the idea and asked me a bit about it.

While I don’t fault them for it, it does make me concerned about the core Bless experience. Again, this was a game that caught my eye. I was hooked on ArcheAge after playing the tutorial in Korean. A free weekend got in TERA won me over and even got my former PvE gaming partner to join me on a PvP server. Like Bless, both of these games are super pretty and push PvP at the endgame.

However, both of these games exposed you to PvP relatively soon as well. The temptation to steal is high in ArcheAge, and fellow players who saw my level 13 strawberry thief swiftly took advantage of my no penalty PvP kill status. I don’t know when PvP starts in Bless, but we didn’t see it today, and everyone noticed that.

Many people publicly said they enjoyed the game today, but after checking for nearby PR and devs, some confided that the game was “playable.” The lack of a second healer was noticed and a bit annoying. No PvP was mentioned by many. A few were confused about what to do with the max level (45) available in the demo. One streamer was sincerely happy, but he also actually played quite a bit of the game before and clearly earned his emissary title. Others seemed like (MMO) streamers first, Bless emissaries second.

To compare to other PvP centric Korean MMOs I have experience with, I left my first ArcheAge session wanting more. I left my first TERA session with a preorder. Today, I left Bless with a confused shrug. I’ve introduced people into the genre with these games in the past. They don’t always stick, but at least they’re good for shared moments. However, I can do the same with a lot of local multiplayer games for far less, and certain free-to-play MMOs, including AA and TERA now. I’m puzzled about the state of the port and just how it’ll fit into the current MMO landscape in just a few short weeks.

Disclosure: In accordance with Massively OP’s ethics policy, we must disclose that Neowiz paid for our writer’s travel to and accommodation at this event. Neowiz has neither requested nor been granted any control or influence over our coverage of the event.
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Kevin McCaughey

Having to pay for a store bought item, a potion to stop PvP, is outrageous! Paying extra not to be annoyed ingame. That’s the biggest slap in the face I have read about in a long time.

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Eggonomicon

As I’ve posted alot of anti openworld PvP comments, let me be clear. I enjoy PvP from my days worshiping PvP gods in MUDs, to flagged wars/Battles in SWG, and Cyrodiil in ESO. But I fight people prepared for PvP, people wanting to PvP; not some poor player minding his/her business questing. And especially not killing the poor player over and over. Laying an ambush for someone wanting to PvP (flagged, in a PvP match/zone) isn’t ganking, that’s just PvP, now murdering a player questing, minding their own business, that’s ganking/griefing.

There is room for PvE and PvP to coexist, many games do, and they do it well. Its when you force every one to PvP that issues arise.

Eggonomicon

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Eggonomicon

I for one am happy with the more PvE aspect! Too many games rely on open world PvP to make the end game, but all to often this degrades into not true PvP but ganking. Those who don’t want a true challenge facing off against prepared opponents but want to grief players over and over. This leads to the downfall of many a game, and is a symptom of anonymous cowards who can’t think about the true repercussions of their juvenile “fun”. PvP should be contestants well prepared for fights, with a true reward system.

Too often this (collective) caliber of player destroys a game, only to move on to destroy another like locusts. So PvE focused with PvP as a side line? Its not flagged PvP but I am now going to try this game; where before I said “pass”.

Eggonomicon

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Mikka Hansen

Korean
hands-off

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Kevin McCaughey

Very sad to say I have to agree. Koreans seem to love a gankfest.

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Neiloch

You can make themselves PvE only through the cash shop or grinding but PvP is integral to the game and it can’t have PvE servers.

Nothing stopping from a servers amount of players making themselves invulnerable to PvP indefinitely but there can’t be a PvE server.

YEAH. SURE. OKAY.

Whats going to be real interesting to see is how those ‘PvE pots’ are blowing up the first few months of release until those same players just get tired of dealing with it and quit.

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TheHiveLeader

Pretty spot on article. Though I’d slightly disagree on the “TERA” feel of the combat. But maybe that’s just me. Other than that though, spot on.

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Brown Jenkin

So I’m pleasantly surprised, maybe even shocked to hear the combat refered to as TERA-like. I was starting to lean toward skipping this game, but that’s definitely enough to make me consider it again. I’m a lil iffy about the tab targeting idea and how that fits together with the action combat though.

As a side note I’m not so sure about those assertions about the “Western Market” balking at world PvP. Surely there are some who truly and deeply hate PvP, but PvE games haven’t seemed to do much to change the genre for a long, long time now.

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TheHiveLeader

Don’t get your hopes up too much for the “TERA” like combat. There’s no clicking to attack. The combo system is TERA esque, but little else feels like TERA.

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Brown Jenkin

Ah, yuck that’s good to know. Even though pressing 1 is largely just an aesthetic difference it feels like a substantial one in play. I never looked back once GW2 swapped to “action mode”

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Jokerchyld

Here is what I don’t understand (about this game and PvP games in general). If you have a PvE component to level and you are fine with that and if all people who LOVE PvP play PvP…. why would you care about people who want to play PvE and were never interested in PvP to begin with?

All you do with that logic is lose playerbase instead of growing it.

I’d be curious to understand the highest (and/or most popular) PvPvE game is today? And how does it compare to games with an optional PvE server. Which one has the biggest population and what is breakdown of that population (how many are playing PvP only and how many are playing PvE only).

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Neiloch

I always wonder this as well. It makes no sense. Its takes very little in the way of resources to make a ‘PvE’ channel or server so any idea that it would ‘detract’ from PvP is baseless.

The biggest games that have been around for a long time in the west are very ‘PvE’ friendly. Even WoW PvP servers for example are still mostly PvE, its just the over world is PvP activated, you still get to do all your PvE dungeons without PvP interference.

What I have experienced is a lot of these games trying to ‘bait and switch’ PvE players. First levels are really PvE friendly, can avoid PvP outright even. But then at mid level or cap it becomes forced. Never have I once been ‘lulled’ into sticking around when this happens. I get PK’d maybe twice while trying to farm or quest, exit, uninstall. However they already got you to purchase the game and possibly 1 month of subscription, maybe even a founder/collection pack all of which more than likely not possible to get refunded.

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Jokerchyld

Exactly. And to be clear it isn’t so much the PvP aspect as it is the PKilling and nature of the community. PvE communities are just more comfortable to be around.

I get the aggressive nature of a PvP community but more towards my point of how they cant really mix. PvP people by and large want to rush for the best gear and dominate at the expense of other players. Got gud.

Where PvE people may want to rush to max level but also allow others to casually to do their thing. No one playstyle or view really interferes with the other without consent.

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Jokerchyld

So far not seeing how this is going to be any different from the normal pattern I’ve experienced

Generic, standard PvE experience until level cap then unbalanced PvP end game taken advantage of by in store items which are NOT pay-to-win but more pay-to-be-better-faster, which is almost the same thing.

This model doesn’t work (for the gamers). It enriches the publisher, but predict this game will be dead (or very low population) within 6-12 months. Just like ArcheAge.

You cannot mix PvP with PvE because players want different things. Let alone that PvP only games devolve into the worst aspect of gamers.

But I guess we will just have to wait and see.

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Brown Jenkin

I think it is pretty absurd to argue that you can’t mix PvP and PvE gamers… since to date just about every MMO has done so (save the rare niche game that is either purely PvE or purely PvP). The problems brought about by PvE and PvP focused games are really different, and the two can complement each other if pulled off well.

PvE games face the constant burden of needing new content and new challenges. So far we haven’t really seen a good example of a PvE game with deep horizontal progression either, so there’s the added problem of old content being worthless after its initial consumption. In one PvE focused game after another you end up with folks complaining about a “lack of content” or generally weak endgame. It seems honestly as if PvE games just can’t manage to serve the broad range of the PvE community and either casual players or hardcore raiders will leave disappointed.

PvP games face the burden of depending really heavily on a committed base of players and a positive community to keep folks playing. They tend to tax developers with a heavy amount of focus needed on class balance as well. One thing they really don’t face however is the problem of “endgame”.

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Jokerchyld

I didn’t say you couldn’t mix it, I said it doesn’t work well when mixed. And there is a difference between a PvE game with PvP (like WoW / ESO) and a PvP game with PvE (like ArcheAge / Bless). In the former, the PvP is OPTIONAL and PvP players can play mutually exclusive from the PvE players. Classes are somewhat balanced in PvP to make it fair. In the latter everyone starts in PvE and then everyone is forced to PvP even if you don’t want to. This is never fun because you always have one group of people preying on another. Kudos to people who like that sort of machinations but I don’t find it fun.

So I agree you can have a battleground system PvP that is separate from PvE because that is optional depending on what you want to do. But the open world PvP when anybody can kill anybody else at any level.

PvE games challenge is lack of sophisticated dynamic systems. The idea of creating static content will always be voraciously consumed by the most avid players, we’ve seen that. A good example of Horizontal progression is Elder Scrolls Online. You can do any (system) you want when you want. Part of this is due to level scaling which I feel is the future. In PvE the end game should really be playing the game, not playing a narrow leveling exercise to finally play at the end (that makes no sense but I digress).

But in the end I’ll take the limitations of say ESO over open world PvP anyday and spend my money there.

I wish Bless the best of luck, but its trajectory doesn’t look promising to me. I’ll take a peek when it launches and see how long I actually last.

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Brown Jenkin

Even if we come from different sides of the PvE/PvP aisle, I agree with lots of what you had to say here. We’ll see how it works out in Bless I guess, open factional PvP doesn’t sound like a huge deal to me, but it might just boil down to how it is implemented. I still have very clear memories of the heyday of WoW in which PvP raids to disrupt PvE focused players areas were a *very* normal thing.

I think the PvE games challenge you’ve mentioned is a huge deal though. I think that games like GW2 (which led the way here) and more recently ESO have done a great job of addressing some core MMO problems via level scaling and more of a focus on horizontal progression, but ultimately without some significant changes to what PvE content *means* I’m not sure there’s much hope for things to get better. Since the death of EQNext I’ve seriously seen nothing on the horizon offering to change some of our PvE standards, and a part of me is genuinely puzzled that anyone could still be interested in the oldschool PvE instance grinders and leveling treadmills.

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Jokerchyld

Thanks.

And to be clear I love the concept of open world PvP. Being out questing. Seeing a group of players and navigating the fight or flight moment and seeing how that turns out. That’s fun and adds much needed risk to the game.

But what happens in reality is you get a (perhaps) small subset of users who dedicate their time to destroy everyone else at all cost. While in and off itself that isn’t bad (another dynamic to deal with), the issue comes down to time and investment. Most players dont want to spend hours developing their environment (be it weapons, items, housing, etc) to run the risk of losing all or some of it. It isn’t fun.

I’ll give a personal example. I liked the game Tree of Life which was survival based. You start naked on an island and have to build up. I spent hours making a simple house from hard earned wood I had to harvest. Then I had to go on a business trip and couldn’t play for 7 days. When I returned my house was decimated. Everything gone. I get it. That’s how the game is played. My point being that is not fun and feel a large(r) majority agree with me. And from a monetary perspective it makes more sense to cater to a wider audience than a niche one, especially if your expectation is growth and longevity.

I dont know the actual numbers. But I’d wager the game had a larger audience at launch than it does now. I no longer associate with that game. Sad, considering how much fun I had initially.

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Brown Jenkin

> While in and off itself that isn’t bad (another dynamic to deal with), the issue comes down to time and investment. Most players dont want to spend hours developing their environment (be it weapons, items, housing, etc) to run the risk of losing all or some of it. It isn’t fun.

Well yeah I mean I agree with you there, its shaped lots of my opinions about MMOs over the years. I cut my PvP teeth on Shadowbane back in the day and loved it, today I realize the idea of a FFA drop on death MMO is madness in a broader market. I think that the development philosophy of games like Crowfall is perfect in that regard as it offers that “brutal environment” for those who like it, along with a more controlled RvR environment with stricter drop rules for those who don’t. I’m just surprised to see folks up in arms about PvP in Bless, I mean it seems more comparable to a WoW or WAR than to something like AoC. At its core the game is still factional, which helps to immediately address some of the typical concerns about gank squads.

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Jokerchyld

I dont think Bless us comparable to WoW PvP. How so?

To me WoW has instances PvP that is more like a side system. Even the new open world PvP they are introducing in BfA is a toggle (which I think is the right way to implement PvP with PvE). Make it an option, everyone is happy.

Where Bless is everyone does PvE until max level 40 then (to my limited understanding) everything after that is open world PvP everywhere… with items in the cash shop to turn it off temporarily. This is what I call forced PvP. I have to be ready for it when I’m in the open world. I dont have an option or toggle. That is where the issue js.

The argument is what is the reason for not having a PvE only shard/server/,instance. The FFA PvP crowd how all the other servers. While people who only want to PvE in bless without fear would have their one server. Which is how WoW does it (until BfA) as well as GW2, ESO and other AAA titles. And PvE people dont complain about having a pvp shard/instance the same way the PvP crowd are. Its hypocrotical.

I’m interested in Crowfall and Shrouds of the Avatar as deep down I do miss the challenge of the old MMOs like Everquest and would love to get that feeling back. But I’m doubtful. It’s a different time and different audience.

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Eggonomicon

And yet PvE games remain the most stable games with a loyal (if niche) playerbase, while PvP centric games burn bright and die. (Except Eve which is the exception, and a very niche title.)

Eggonomicon

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Suikoden

If you remember Tera at launch, it did PvEvP. You either had to opt in for it, or your guild had to go to war with another guild, then it was a free for all within those guilds. I remember questing in Tera at launch and being able to attack rival guilds, but not PvE players questing. There was benefits for PvPing to control towns and stuff. Not sure if it’s still like that, but I thought it worked fine. If Bless would implement that system, that would work. I guess they kind of are, only you’re going to have to purchase those potions that make you immune to PvP.

For someone that spends a lot of time afk in game, like myself, sounds like that system could get pricey. Not sure how it will work out.

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Kevin McCaughey

Absolutely. PvP brings out the most bestial attitudes in players in my experience of Archeage. I will never play another Korean gankfest again and it looks like I will have to pass on Bless. The bit that really got me in Archeage is that (like you say) it was great until you max levelled then you realised what a total gankfest PvP was if you had even managed to avoid PvP upto 50 (which is unlikely).

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ting

I’d get nervous at any game company that prioritizes customer service on how much money you spend. If you spend $39 or $200 you should be able to receive the same level of support if you have an issue with the game. Knowing that you’re not getting the full level of support without giving them lots of money is a big RED flag for me.

With that said I’ll play it and enjoy the 1-2 months out of it before it does go P2W, but you’d be fooling yourselves if you didn’t think a game built upon F2P monetization won’t change directions into P2W once the Hype falls off. It’s almost predictable from most these Korean ports.

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jay

Why play it at all if that is your viewpoint? This confuses me..

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Leiloni

The idea of VIP service is common not just to MMO’s, but to everything in life. Paying more for better service in one way or another has been around for decades if not longer. I’m not sure why this is a foreign idea to you.

Besides, how often do you even send in a ticket to an MMO support? Personally, almost never.

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Roger Melly

Is a VIP service that prioritizes customer service common in mmo’s ? I’ve never encountered it before .

Also its kind of silly to say just because something happens in real life it should also happen in a virtual environment . The whole thing about virtual environments is that they should avoid the pitfalls of real life .

I imagine a game that makes someone a second class citizen when they maybe are that in the real world because of what they can and can’t afford would be a huge turn off for a majority of gamer’s.