Webzen is removing Mu Origin from service in the Netherlands over loot boxes

    
10
Bye, no one will weep.

The ultimate goal of most legislation introduced vis-a-vis loot boxes generally seems aimed at making the companies behind these games change the mechanics of the aforementioned boxes. However, Webzen has reacted to new laws in the Netherlands with a more efficient stance. Mu Origin will no longer be available in the country as of June 20th, removed from both the Google Play store and the iOS stores in the region. The game will remain available for play elsewhere.

There’s no mention of any compensation for players who had spent money on the title in the past or whether refunds will be offered, although the game’s services will remain available in other countries with (presumably) no changes. Our condolences to Dutch players unable to enjoy the title any longer.

Source: Official Site via MMORPG.com. We have corrected our original report to clarify it’s Mu Origin affected, not Mu Legend.
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Crowe

Netherlands, I salute you!
Now I just wish the US would do the same thing.

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Danny Smith

The fact that new anti lootbox and stricter privacy laws are seeing multiple asian mmos simply pull out rather than change some stuff in a patch really suggests some of these games must be ran by a skeleton crew on the cheap if its better to quit rather than change a system.

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Weilan

Rather, it’s because they don’t care and probably they never got too much traffic or revenue from The Netherlands. And if they decide to pull out means the game is not worth the time.

Buying ESO was the best investment in an online game I’ve ever made. After I finally appreciated it for what it really is (3 years after purchasing it and many ons and off I finally started playing it seriously) – a high quality modern MMORPG. The simple fact that it’s an already established franchise and the full voice acting makes it the perfect MMORPG for me.

Godnaz
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Godnaz

As these anti-RNG (gambling) laws expand in the West, the Asian MMO will cease to exist in the West. Adapting is been slow and difficult for a culture who sees nothing wrong with these highly profitable mechanics.

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Schmidt.Capela

Even in Asia there are limits to what they can stand. It’s why Chinese law forces companies to reveal the odds of each item in a lootbox, and why Japan outright banned what was at the time seen as the most lucrative — and exploitative — lootbox model (the Kompu Gacha).

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Shaun Shaungbr

No great loss Webzen not the most popular company.

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Randy Savage

Good. If your game can’t survive without lockboxes, then it doesn’t deserve to survive. Take your garbage to a country that doesn’t care about profiting off destructive vices. There’s still plenty to choose from… for now.

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Bilal Waraich

This is going to keep happening until we get a EU wide ban on this nonsense.

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Arktouros

This is exactly what I predicted was going to happen with most game companies.

It’s the path of least resistance for development studios and now players who are mad the studios can direct them to contact their political representatives. It’s a win all around for studios as they do this as it lets government know the studios will just pull the product and create potential backlash for the government while losing minor revenue since only smaller countries/states are doing this right now cause it’s safe for them to do so (typically have little to no developer studios in them so no loss of revenue).

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kgptzac

Could you also have predicted that Communism wouldn’t be successful if not adopted on a global scale?