Here’s everything you want to know about Fallout 76, including the making-of documentary

    
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Everyone is very mature.

With players compiling a massive amount of useful information and Noclip releasing a making-of documentary for Fallout 76, we’re starting to arrive at a much better understanding of what this game will be.

We learned a lot of new information from this video, such as the fact that all players will be able to see where each other are on any given map, that players will have to work together to solve puzzles in order to unlock the nuclear warhead bunkers, and that there are safeguards in place to keep consensual PvP from becoming a ganker’s paradise. The team also mentioned things like mutation traits, cosmetic microtransactions, free DLC, the ability to repair weapons, special perk cards, and the lack of player corpse looting.

The studio dealt with the major shift from single-player to multiplayer as well “It’s a mindset change,” said Design Director Emil Pagliarulo. “You have folks here who have been making single-player quests for so long, and what does it mean to support more than one player? So there’s a lot of things that go into that.”

Source: RedditYouTube. Thanks Rafael and Microwatt!
Massively Overpowered is on the ground in Los Angeles, California, for E3 2018, bringing you expert MMO coverage on Anthem, Fallout 76, Elder Scrolls Online, and everything else on display at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo!
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Rottenrotny

Excited for this. I’ve been talking about co-op/multiplayer/MMO Fallout since Fallout 3 was current. I got my beta key and am just waiting for beta to go live!

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Alex Willis

1. NoClip makes really great documentaries. We are lucky to have him.
2. Besides Todd Howard’s SUPER CAGEY and INCREDIBLY VAGUE exec-speak at the end, this doc only made me more excited to get into this game.

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rafael12104

Ok, boys and girls, batten down the hatches because here I come to piss some of you off. And maybe to lighten the mood for others. I apologize in advance to all of you. I love you guys and this is why I am here. I’ll hopefully brief

But, for the love of PePe! Why are we all acting like noobs to gaming forums? Suddenly, the end is upon us? The Fallout franchise has become a poor facsimile of its own storyline? WTF?

Look, we all know what can happen. We angst-ridden but well-intentioned few who frequent this site, have seen it all. Griefing, ganking, cheating, trolling, hacking, P2W, pay to lose, f2p, B2P, subs, lies, deceptions, Russian oligarchs…

And we worry. We worry about our favorite genre because, well, we might be left out in the shuffle. Because the investment required to make a good MMO, much less an MMORPG, is significant. Because the time required for development is long. Because too many times the best-laid plans turn out to be dogshit. And another year goes by with fast food MMOs being king.

And now here comes Bethesda Gaming Studio to try their luck. This isn’t some bullshit fly by night thing ala Mark Kern, this isn’t some million dollar prepaid boon dongle that has yet to be released. BGS walks in the door with the game in hand, (the game in hand!) and fully vested to make it work with all of the resources of Bethesda Inc behind them.

And they tell E3 and millions of gamers that good MMOs are worth the effort. That a company with a good brand should take risks do some exciting. And that they are taking the Fallout IP and doing exactly that! And, that you don’t have to wait, it will see the light of day this very year?!

And our response? Our response here at MOP? What should it be?

Fuck, yes!!! Let’s go!!!

Now, this doesn’t negate the criticism or the pitfalls. Nope. We know them all too well.

But maybe it is time to step into this and see if maybe, just maybe we can help make this game work. We step into the mire and begin the struggle with BGS and maybe even against them.

Because good MMOs do matter. Because this far from being a knock-off of Rust. Because we want to take the place of NPCs and populate an MMO with real people with bottle caps!

Ok… I’ll stop there. I’m on board to try.

For now, BGS still has some major decisions to make and things to reconsider. We will see where we go next, but yeah, I’m on that ship heading for that Iceberg. But this time I’m armed and ready to help blow that fucker up.

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Schmidt.Capela

There are a few franchises I never wanted to see made into MMOs. Knights of the Old Republic; The Elder Scrolls; Fallout; games with a certain kind of story-heavy branching gameplay, that I play for the possibilities of exploring the story with the help of multiple savegames and mods. Or, in other words, games for which the jump into an always-online format removes everything that makes them enjoyable for me.

It’s like I say of ESO; if it was the exact same game, only with an IP that had nothing, at all, to do with Elder Scrolls, I would have tried it and perhaps even enjoyed it, but with the game being set in the Elder Scrolls setting it serves as a constant reminder of everything I love in other Elder Scrolls games that I will never be able to have in a MMO.

As such, I will never help any MMO based on those franchises succeed. Because, for them, I would rather see the MMO fail so the devs can bring a new single-player installment sooner rather than later.

BTW, different people have completely different ideas of what a good MMO looks like. In my specific case I came to the conclusion that I can’t really stand virtual world-style MMOs, or even shared sandboxes, despite dearly loving tabletop RPGs and single-player sandboxes; instead, for the most part I can only have a good MMO experience in themepark games.

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rafael12104

Well, we are on different boats but we float in the same ocean. I love games. All types of games. And I will stand up for single player games and theme parks right next to you. Some of the best experiences I’ve ever had playing games have been in those two subgenres.

And I hate, just hate when forum warriors turn these issues into us versus them. In fact, that started happening already. Factions for Single Player vs. Multiplayer are springing up, which just misses the point.

There is room for all but I will support FO76 all I can, because I believe it can be great. And because I thought about the possibility of playing Fallout 3-4 with friends long before this all began.

I will be getting a private server for FO76 when it becomes available as a failsafe. If 76 by default doesn’t offer what I want, I might be able to make it myself so to speak.

And if that happens, you can join me if you want, and play any way you want without ganking or griefing or fear that other players will become a nuisance. I’m not saying you should, but it will be an option if you ever decide to check it out.

That is my plan, for now, anyway. We will see what happens as we move through 76 beta and launch.

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Schmidt.Capela

you can join me if you want

Nah. It lacks everything I want in a Fallout game, so I don’t think I would play it even if I was given a free copy after private servers were already added. I’m more likely to just read the pertinent story information on a wiki while giving the game a pass.

It’s similar to what I said about ESO; I actually got a copy for free, installed it and tried to play, and still can’t stand the game because the kind of gameplay I enjoy Elder Scrolls games for is simply impossible in it. I would actually be happier if ESO had never been made, as I feel like the extended wait between Skyrim and Elder Scrolls 6 — already the longest in the series, and close to twice the average wait between installments in the series — was to avoid dividing Elder Scrolls fans between multiple games.

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Emiliano Lozada

I would actually be happier if ESO had never been made

This is the most retarded argument I keep seeing come up. “Oh, I don’t like it so it shouldn’t exist!” Clearly, there’s a damn market for it if it’s being made. The Power Armor Edition is sold out on Beth Store AND Amazon on the same day it came up. Before you come around saying that it’s resellers, well even they need to find a market to sell to. Can’t resell something that ‘nobody’ wants.

Get off your damn high horse. I didn’t enjoy Fo4 vanilla (Fo4 VR though? Love it) but I’m not going to strip away the enjoyment of the MILLIONS of people that like Fo4. You don’t like it? Okay cool, don’t buy it and move on to the next entry.

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Schmidt.Capela

“I would be happier if it didn’t exist” is very different from “it shouldn’t exist”.

And I stand by my words. If instead of ESO we had gotten Elder Scrolls VI I would have purchased it (plus any and all DLC, it’s one of the very few games I would be willing to break my personal rule about maximum spending in a single player game) and would likely be happily playing and modding it. ESO, on the other game, is a game I never wanted, one that I will never be able to enjoy, so its existence brings no benefit nor joy to me.

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draugris

Tbh it does not matter much what or how much is pre ordered. Gamers nowadays are like junkies in the backyard trying to buy anything without questioning what seems to satisfy their addiction. Unfortunately that´s how desperate the community has become.

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mr_gibbins

I don’t know why people shit the bed about ESO not being a single player TES game, you were always going to get another single player because it’s to big a winner. ESO just brought the ES franchise to a different group of gamers is all.

Same for Fallout 76, it’s not the end of single player Fallout games, and it’s certainly not the end of the world.

All you are doing by being so negative about it is missing out on what many consider to be a great game.

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Schmidt.Capela

I did try to play ESO. I could never enjoy it. Thankfully I didn’t pay for the game, having gotten the copy effectively for free.

I suspect my reaction, should someone gift me a copy of Fallout 76 (as I’m not going to waste any money with it), would be the same.

Those games have nothing of what makes Elder Scrolls or Fallout games enjoyable for me, so I’m not losing anything by discarding them out of hand.

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Sally Bowls

I don’t know how FO76 will turn out. The one fact I know about FO76 was they did not do a good job on a multimillion-dollar launch. No telling how this will turn out, but based upon the launch so far, I think being skeptical is quite justified.

re ” just maybe we can help make this game work.” – the game launches in five months. Software and SQA being what they are, I think the time when customer feedback on non-price issues can affect or effect much has passed quite a while ago.

I also don’t think FO76 is not an MMO or MMORPG so am puzzled that you seem to imply it is.

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rafael12104

Well Sally, I know that they can certainly change things at this late date and beyond. I know because I work in a field that includes SW development. The churn is greatest now and will continue all the way up to and after launch. QA, unfortunately for them, is not something that gets one pass. It never is. Even after embargo and lock.

You don’t think FO76 is an MMO or an MMORPG? Fair enough. I stopped trying to define what that means for others. The old guard has a quite different take I’m sure. But for me, the idea that I can play a game with dozens of people sharing the same world at the same time makes it massive enough and certainly worth talking about.

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Schmidt.Capela

Well, it seems like “dozens” is limited to less than 3 dozen players in the same map, which makes it about as much a MMO as GTAO, only with 4x less player density due to the map being about 4x larger.

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rafael12104

True. And much preferred. Afterall, as was mentioned in the presser, it’s not supposed to be an amusement park out there.

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traja

Personally I don’t like calling games that are not MMORPG in the classical sense as MMO. Doing that makes it too much of an umbrella term. For example if dozens of players is all that it takes then Battlefield games are MMOs. You can rationalize a definition like that but it is kind of meaningless in any practical sense. Rather I would classify Fallout 76 as a multiplayer survival game.

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Dušan Frolkovič

The problem is then, what is the definition. Cause ask 100 MMORPG players and you will get 101 answers. There is no “classical” definition, everyone has their own.

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Sally Bowls

Yeah, what is massively is a very personal concept, everybody’s not wrong, so pointless to argue over. For me, “fewer than twice as many people as a WoWS match spread out over a much larger map” does not come close to making the cut.

————————–

I think there is large gap in my understanding.
Re: “with dozens of people sharing the same world at the same time ” – it just struck me that I am currently ignorant as to what that means. E.g., you are playing with 35 other people on that same world and everyone has built a structure. Now everyone logs off for an hour, then you log back on. In a behaves-like-a-WoW-realm paradigm, you would be alone and your structure and the other 35 structures from the last session would be there.

But I don’t know how to interpret Todd’s

Your character isn’t tied to one server, as a matter of fact you’ll never even see a server when you play,”

I sure as hell hope that any structures I created my last session will be there when I relog on. Will the structures of my original 35 fellow players be in the world? Will there be other people with other structures there? Will the people I was [trying to avoid] playing with last time have any affect on the people I will be [trying to avoid] playing with the next time I log in?

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Schmidt.Capela

If I understood correctly, you only have a small movable area to build, one you can place in any flat piece of terrain of sufficient size (the CAMP); anything you build there will despawn as soon as you log out and respawn when you log back in. If the specific place you were using has been claimed by another player, then your CAMP will instead be in blueprint mode, allowing you to place it somewhere else. You will also be able to move it to a different place even without a placement conflict, though this apparently will cost a small fee in caps.

All things considered, it sounds quite similar to how Trove’s housing works.

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Jokerchyld

The presentation was cryptic at best, but wouldn’t expect more from an executive. This means there are STILL many questions to be answered (at least for me) before I lay down final judgement.

Open world, small world, lobby world PvP never works. Never. It always. Always devolves into something not fun (understanding some people like that). I see this as an opportunity for Bethesda to try and add some PvE/casual flavor to an otherwise PvP oriented game. And for that I’m willing to try it out, though deep down (as a Fallout fan) I dont think this will be my thing.

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draugris

Funny that you mention Rust. Because if these guys come over to F76 then good night F76. PvP everywhere and you can see everybody on the map anytime, this is basically a douchebags paradise. The only thing that keeps me interested are private servers so i can enjoy the world with a friend or two.

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windows_me

Given how terrible FO3 and FO4 were I actually think this sounds like an improvement. At least I won’t have to put up with so much god awful Bethesda writing.

Serrenity
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Serrenity

You are the only person I’ve seen refer to FO3 and FO4 as terrible games.

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Tobasco da Gama

Sadly, there are a lot of deluded people who spent 700 hours obsessively playing Fallout 4 and still call it a terrible RPG and a disgrace to the series. This is just how gamers talk now. If you don’t hate everything, you must be a shill or a fanboy.

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Schmidt.Capela

AFAIK many fans do consider Fallout 4 to be weak when compared with Fallout 3 and New Vegas, even if they don’t see Fallout 4 as being a bad game per see.

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Jokerchyld

As one of those who put in hundreds of hours into FO3 and NV I can tell you FO4 while a quality game was definitely a step back, essentially removing a lot of the Role Playing aspect of the game and focused more on the shooting aspect.

And to be clear, I feel the same way about Skyrim. Again, another phenomenal game but was more limited than Morrowind or Oblivion were in terms of options. But I guess that what today’s generation of gamers want.

The announcement of TES VI was meh. Until I see how the systems work and what options I have I dont have much confidence at the moment.

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Schmidt.Capela

Ironically, at launch at least, vanilla Skyrim allowed for far more diversity in character builds than vanilla Morrowind or Oblivion.

You see, in both Morrowind and Oblivion, with a little micromanagement in the order in which you increase skills, you could make a character with every single stat and skill maxed, which — due to the way perks work in those games — would automatically have all perks. It was the objectively best build, capable of doing everything at maximum efficiency.

Skyrim was different. It had 251 perks, of which before the Legendary patch you could only get 80. Thus, different from the previous Elder Scrolls games, it forced you to actually make meaningful choices. That, of course, changed with the Legendary patch, which allowed players to get to level 252 (and beyond) and, thus, to get all perks without mods, cheats, or exploits.

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Jokerchyld

They created the legendary system because the previous one was too limiting. And I would also suspect why it was built into Fallout 4 (you could level endlessly natively). Limiting options doesn’t limit diversity it limits choice.

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Sally Bowls

Topic Suggestion: The “Moral Hazards” in B2P games

I think FO76 is a good way to explore this.
1) Having to provision online servers means it is slightly more profitable if 30M people buy the game, hate it and stop in the first month versus the same 30M buy the game and love it and play for 1,000 hours.

2) (numbers for example only) FO sold say 20M so they estimate FO5 could sell 20M. But if they make something new, FO76, and 20M FO fans go “I’m skeptical but I’ll try it” and 20M FN fans go “idk but i’ll try it” then it is 40M sales. If both groups are dissatisfied and stop within a month, it was still 40M sales. Is “making a game the fans love” as profitable as shooting for “what is the minimum the existing fans will accept while focusing on expanding the target audience?”

3) Doesn’t this reward spending more on marketing? (A typical AAA MMO with a 200M budget might be 100M for development and 100M for promotion. What if that got allocated 120M promotion, 80M dev?) Spending an extra 20M on dev might get the average person to play 25 instead of 21 days but generates little additional revenue. But spending an extra 20M on marketing will get you new sales.

If Blizzard skimps on BfA and then it costs them as people quit giving them $15/month.

If Bioware/Anet skimps on SWTOR/GW2, then it costs them as people quit playing and ca$hshop purchases decline.

If Bethesda skimps on FO76 design, then as long as I was interested enough to try it, it does not cost them much money.

I prefer it the closer a company’s financial incentives line up with my goals.
IMO, WoW/GW2/SWTOR “make a game I love” is better than FO76’s “make a game I want to try.”

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mr_gibbins

The downside being keep up with the Jones’ mechanics like artifact weapons or other grinds to keep you paying cos you don’t want to get left behind.

Ups and downs with everything.

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MrNastyButler

This game seems more and more like one of those “wait till they release the game fully complete like a year after it’s pre-released”.

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Sana Tan

Displaying where all the players are in the map sounds like a terrible idea. This would be a ganker or griefer paradise. Furthermore… didn’t they say they wanted every encounter to feel special? Then what’s special if you already know when you will have an encounter?

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zuldar

I’d rather not have pvp in this myself, hopefully it can at least be toggled when the private server feature comes around. Honestly, other then shoehorning pvp into it the rest of the features actually sound halfway decent. Except the item durability, hopefully the weapon degradation system isn’t too bad.

Oh well, at least they’re working on a new Elder Scrolls game.

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Castagere Shaikura

I’M not buying this BS. They either have no system yet or they do for pvp. And they don’t want to tip their hat before the game goes on sale. Its Fortnite in a Fallout shell. So they either don’t want to piss off single player Fallout fans and not piss off the Fortnite fans before it goes on sale. The way they are answering the question is shady.

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Jokerchyld

I’ll admit I was skittish at first. Turning Fallout from PvE to PvP felt like a full on betrayal. But after getting some more facts (if in fact they prove to be true when this game releases) I’m a bit more open to it.

“– There’s an actual, official auto-aim mechanics built into the game (VATS). You can get headshot by someone who is using tab-targetting; getting better at aiming, thus, provides far less of an advantage than in similar games.”

This could lead to some new and interesting online experiences. Almost like an online turn-based game (almost). Thats enough for me to give a try.