Shigeru Miyamoto didn’t want to make an MMO because he would get bored

    
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Yeah, that sounds right.

Have you ever wondered about an MMO developed by Nintendo’s resident legend, Shigeru Miyamoto? You may be intrigued by Miyamoto’s remarks at the Computer Entertainment Developers Conference in Yokohama because it turns out he specifically didn’t want to make one when the discussion came up. Surely he has some scathing critique of the way the genre works that is antithetical to his design ethos, right?

Nope! He just gets bored. He explained that while the genre was big and there was talk of making one, he prefers to move on to the next project and wouldn’t want to continually add new content to an existing game.

A few years ago, when MMORPGs were coming into fashion, I didn’t want to make one. […] Since I get tired of things easily, I don’t want to keep making one game.

So it does have something to do with the genre, but more with his particular areas of focus. You can take a look at all of Miyamoto’s translated comments on other aspects of the game industry on Kotaku, if you’re curious.

Source: Kotaku
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kgptzac

It’s actually a good thing that a person is not working on something he knows he doesn’t like. It’s one of the ways of avoiding producing shitty products. But I’m wary of treating video game developers like celebrities and visionaries that worth worshipping and hyping. Good things usually don’t happen when that happens.

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Mewmew

But the design teams and live teams are very often two different groups. Yes, a few people overlap, but a lot go away when the initial design is done. He could very well create an MMORPG and then leave it to the live team to do the rest.

I mean he couldn’t continue to take credit for stuff that other people worked on when he left or anything (like the way he gets nearly all the credit for games he steps in the room briefly while they’re creating them, no offense or anything). But there is no reason he couldn’t help design one and then move on to other projects. He doesn’t have to stick around and baby it for the lifetime of the game.

I personally feel that you really need to know MMORPGs to do a good job at making one, and that he may not know them that well to know what would work and what wouldn’t. I’m sure he’d have a good number of advisors around however to help say what would work and what wouldn’t :D

It’s funny when we give one person far more credit for things in games than they earn just because they’ve become a celebrity in the business. Just how much does he add to the design in games he works on these days anyway?

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Sorenthaz

Makes sense and fits with Nintendo’s track record tbh. Only in the last few years have they really started bringing DLC to games, and even then it’s not in the ‘games as a service’ fashion.

Andrew Ross
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Andrew Ross

Except for a few titles. Mario Kart, Smash Bros, Pokemon (though Nintendo’s just a major stakeholder in The Pokemon Company), Splatoon, and Animal Crossing, off the top of my head, are all series that play fairly similarly with each entry recycling/updating old content and throwing new content on top of it. All of those IPs are ripe for at least a larger scale online experience, especially with Nintendo asking for payment on their online games soon.

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Sorenthaz

Yeah, I mentioned in another comment that Animal Crossing would make a potentially good online game. There’s definitely some games that would work well online, it’s just a matter of whether or not Nintendo is willing to do so. Mario Karts as far back as the DS version have had online functionality IIRC, but they could certainly take it further and have some more competitive ranks or such to it.

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Robert Mann

That is a very acceptable reason for not wanting to make an MMO. I do think he could have put forth an original concept and let it go like most Nintendo series, but he might have felt that was making a promise that he wasn’t keeping at the same time, due to the very nature of MMOs.

I think that having somebody who is specialized in the initial creation of different things would do well all in all with an MMO, but I can understand feeling like it would be a long haul project.

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Sorenthaz

That and over time you get limited by tech from whenever it was that you started it.

Tbh at best I could imagine them maybe doing a BotW-esque sandbox or Animal Crossing online.

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TomTurtle

MMOs are a big investment. I don’t blame him for not wanting to get tied down to one. I can relate to the idea of getting easily bored too so I sympathize with him there. At least he has the freedom to be able to make a decision like that.

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Sariel

Really weird viewpoint of Shigeru’s and/or Nintendo’s. They’ve been criticized fairly heavily, rightfully so, for essentially making the same game for quite a while. Pokemon, Mario Party, 2D side-scrolling Mario platformers, among other Nintendo series might as well just be content patches MMO-style rather than wholly new games. ESPECIALLY the “Third version” Pokemon games like Ultra Sun/Ultra Moon compared to Sun/Moon.

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Schmidt.Capela

This is Shigeru Miyamoto, not Nintendo.

If you look at the games he is credited for, he usually only directs or design the first game in a series, or the game where there has been significant change. For example, among the Zelda games he designed the first Zelda, the Japanese-only BS Zelda, and Ocarina of Time; for the rest of the Zelda games he was just the producer.

BTW, the only main line Pokémon games he was involved with were the original ones.

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Minimalistway

Just imagine Mario Party online, Nintendo is good at making mini-games, Wii sports, Wii Play … etc, they can make a big game with these mini-games, or they can make something totally new.

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Schmidt.Capela

Nintendo is absurdly bad at online, though. And in part it’s intentional; for their first-party titles they want something where you can let a 5-years old loose and never worry about the kid seeing anything inappropriate, which means lots of restrictions on how people can befriend each other and how they can interact.

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Jeffery Witman

Didn’t want to keep making the same game. Also, get ready for Super Smash Mario Party of Zelda.