The Daily Grind: Which anticipated MMO project did you end up ignoring altogether?

    
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WE GO TOGETHER

Let me tell you a tale of Sea of Thieves. For the year or so leading up to that game’s launch, I was deep into the hype as anyone could get. I loved the art style, the pirate angle, the sense of humor, the freedom of exploration, and the works. I fully anticipated playing it to death when it finally launched.

However, right before that happened, we started to get a much better picture of the cutthroat PvP design that lurked underneath those attractive visuals. The potential for nonstop griefing and the additional issue of the lack of a real character creator quickly killed any enthusiasm I had — and I never bought it.

I feel like this happens all too often, when there’s a game or patch coming up that we claim will grab us for sure, but when the time comes, we kind of ignore it. When has this happened to you?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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Oleg Chebeneev

Almost all semi-recent AAA MMOs: GW2, SWToR, TESO, Wildstar, Black Desert, Bless, etc.

Im tired of mediocrity. Of “been there done that”. I want something fresh and exciting.

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Nick Martin

The most recent that springs to mind is Camelot Unchained. It went into testing, and I honestly don’t care. I wanted that game a few years ago when I backed it for a fairly significant chunk of change. Right now, I have different and better things to play.

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Hirku

I pretty much ignore all anticipated MMOs because as a latecomer to the genre I still have plenty of old titles to try that look like fun to me even if they’re worn out to everybody else.

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imayb1

I do this a lot. I get interested in a game’s visuals, or some feature they tout that sounds like fun, and then… PvP. Unavoidable, harsh-penalty looting or perma-death, unhindered, constant-threat PvP. A few games will start throwing in little caveats, like a B2P potion that gives you 15 min. of reprieve per day or a player council that will (supposedly) punish griefers. No thanks. Effectively put on my block list.

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anarres

More than a few. One of the oddest, GW2. I had played some GW1 and liked it; then was excited to try GW2 at the HoT expansion. I actually bought it, and didn’t play it.

Another, I regret today, Landmark. Again, I bought it pre-release and never played it.

In the GW2 case, I was reading around, and it felt more of a theme park than I thought, didn’t find a RP guild I would join, plus the vocal defense of a ‘it’s just cosmetics’ cash shop where you could in reality buy the in-game currency (iirc?), turned me off.

In the second case, I was waiting for EQ Next, and I saw Landmark as an unpolished sandbox, which I postponed getting into…until it was no more.

I should fix the one I still can…

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Utakata

I am more of a “don’t play, but have not forgotten” type. o.O

Polyanna
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Polyanna

All of them since 2014. That was the last year on record when any games that seemed even remotely appealing were released.

At this point, in order to draw my interest at all, the game needs to be basically just like ESO, only better in every way, and with a setting or IP that actually excites me (i.e., sci-fi, and ideally a real franchise that I care about).

Until something like that comes along, ESO and the occasional relapse into STO account for all of my /played hours, and probably will for the foreseeable future.

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Schmidt.Capela

My first one was Ragnarok Online Beta, back before WoW.

I loved a lot of the concepts for the game; it looked, and to a certain point played, like a traditional Japanese aRPG, and I love those. And to cement the deal it was one of the few games that weren’t double-dipping; it was subscription-based, but you didn’t have to purchase the base game, just pay the subscription.

Then I got into the middle levels and found out how the devs were using the difficulty curve to force players to group up; players were resorting to sitting at the entrance to the higher level zones while spamming in chat looking for groups. That not just pushed me out of the game, but also made me put much more effort in researching MMOs before getting into them than the effort I put into a single-player game. After all, in a single-player game I can always use mods or cheats to nullify design elements I dislike, so I can force those games to conform to what I find enjoyable (which, BTW, is why I will never even consider purchasing a console that hasn’t been hacked; the latest Zelda, for example, becomes so much more fun and enjoyable when I disable gear decay).

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Paul

I’ve been “anticipating” a Fallout MMO for years – now I’m meh, I’ll pass :(

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Montjoy Onew

Bless.
I was excited about the game for years but by the time details of the US version began releasing I could not have cared less.