The Daily Grind: How do you take time off from an MMO?

    
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Sometimes the game tells you it's done, which does save a certain amount of time.

Sometimes you need a break. That’s natural; no matter how much you might like Neverwinter or World of Warcraft or EVE Online, you need some time to do other things. That’s completely natural. But the question is how you go about that, because there are actually a lot of different approaches available to you!

Sure, you could just not play for a week or a month or whatever. But MMOs are always ongoing, and sometimes that means losing some progress from regularly refreshed content. You could also take a few weeks of only logging in for the bare minimum. You could even ask someone else to log in for you, which is a pretty terrible idea but sometimes happens.

And that’s not counting the personal connections you have to various people in the game, meaning you have to ask yourself if you want to keep talking with them, do other things and play other multiplayer titles, and so forth. So we’re putting the question to you, dear readers. How do you take time off from an MMO?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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Ernost
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Ernost

I have a number of MMO’s installed on my pc, and when I start to experience burn-out with one of them, I switch to another. There is no point in forcing yourself to continue to play a game you don’t want to, especially when there are so many options to choose from.

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Toy Clown

Because I’m considerate of others, I don’t just ‘disappear’ into net space, to pop back in a year later as if I never went anywhere. I detest when people do this and stay away from them because it shows me they don’t care about the people behind the keyboard they’ve played with.

For the MMOs I end up RPing in, I’ll create an exit storyline and let the people I RP with know that I’m taking a break. When the storyline is finished, I’ll update the character profile and leave an OOC message that I’m on extended leave, then tagging the profile as “player on break”. I’ll let people I play with regularly know they can contact me on discord anytime.

When I log out, knowing I won’t be around for awhile, I’ll screenshot hotkey bars, and other settings that I’d be lost without if drastic changes happen while I’m gone. I also screenshot friend lists so I’m not totally lost logging back in and swimming through a sea of name-changes, deleteds, and server transfers (like in FFXIV). Then I’m done! Off on a break from the MMO.

deekay_000
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deekay_000

i stay in touch with people. but the people i tend to game with stay in touch out of game mor ethan in game comms so it’s not that big a deal (re my post below).

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Arsin Halfmoon

Stay away from people just because they leave an MMO without saying goodbye? Eh, thats something not worth caring about. Besides, im pretty sure you’re not entitled for a goodbye or a reason. If they wanna say goodbye, its their choice, and chances are, you shunning them is pretty low on their list of priorities. Besides, we have discord and stuff these days anyway

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Paul

I tend not to plan it – I lose the urge to log in and walk away to something else till I feel the urge to come back again…

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NeoWolf

for me it is multiple MMO’s of different genre’s. If I get bored of a Fantasy MMO I go play a Supers, get bored of the supers go play a sci fi etc.. that sort of thing.

However in recent years there has been little to fill the genre slots worth my time or interest so MMO burnout sends me to single player games like Xcom, Civ, Endless Space 2, Fallouts, Elder Scrolls, most RPGs etc.etc..

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Utakata

…usually when I go to the bathroom? Kinda difficult to bring the desktop with me to play it there. o.O

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Bryan Correll

Maybe you can’t bring the desktop to the bathroom……but you could try the other way around.

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Utakata

…I’d rather not experience that Cartman gif moment (or movement) that Mr. Schlag used to wave around here. /eww :(

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Hirku

I don’t take any significant time off unless I’m quitting and uninstalling, and to prevent burnout I always have at least one other game to play. Usually it’s another MMO, or a collection of roguelikes. Sometimes I’ll switch between them for a couple days, but most of the time I play a little bit of everything each day.

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Dagget Burmese

Every january we spend a month in Minecraft modded. Then at some point 1/2 way thru the year we try some other game out for some weeks.

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Schmidt.Capela

This changed with time.

For the first few years playing MMOs I simply didn’t take a time off, in large part due to not wanting to let down in-game friends; the one time, back then, I walked away from a game and returned a few months later I had every intention to never return.

This level of dedication was a big mistake, almost getting me burned with the genre as a whole.

After that close call I play whatever I want, when I want, commitment and social ties be damned. It’s why I forcefully prevent other players from ever depending on me for long term and even medium term goals, and make sure every in-game friend I make is aware that myself vanishing without warning isn’t just possible, but likely.

Reader
Arktouros

With Black Desert Online it’s pretty easy. Set yourself up doing an AFK activity and just go play another game or do whatever. Usually if I’m breaking I’ll also shut down medium level interaction activities like farming as well and invest more in nodes for workers to gather materials for me instead. From there it’s a matter of how often you wanna check in. There’s 3-6 hour activities (processing heavy mats), there’s 8-10 hour activities (fishing, processing light mats, skill point training, etc) and then there’s super long afk (horse training, strength training, etc). Usually you want a good energy dump. All told you can get in/out in under 5 minutes a day. Most of us use remote software you can enable on your phone and check in.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

Delete all my characters, burn the place to the ground, and pretend it never happened.

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Hirku

Don’t forget to salt the virtual earth. ; )