Star Citizen’s latest Reverse the Verse video focuses on persistent universe design

    
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Roberts Space Industries recently released its latest Reverse the Verse video dev-blog, and it’s a doozy. The full video, which is chock-full of information that’s sure to be of interest to Star Citizen fans, clocks in at just over an hour long, but thankfully for those of us who lack the time and/or attention spans for a feature-length dev vlog, the fine folks at Star Citizen fansite Relay have put together an easily digestible summary of the video’s main points.

Although there’s not nearly enough space here to include every piece of information here, some of the highlights include discussion of the game’s real-estate system, mission updates in the upcoming patch 3.3, and potential space-weather phenomena, to name just a few. The team’s approach to real-estate seems to be of particular interest, as the devs hope to implement it such that hangars and habitation modules are non-instanced, making real estate at popular stations and/or in more convenient locations more desirable and thus more expensive, creating a realistic, fluctuating real-estate economy. Information-hungry fans can check out the full tl;dr summary over at Relay, or if you’ve got an hour to spare, you can click past the cut for the full Reverse the Verse video.

Source: Relay

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Gene Elder

more talk about what might happen in a couple years or more. just more reminders of how nothing is finished or close to finished.

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Bruno Brito

I like Oleg cuz he’s funny. I’m waiting on Leth and Joe.

Whom do i Kickstart to get them here?

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Let's MEGA!

Best damn space sim ever. Citizencon will further cement this fact

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Melissa McDonald

The problem with Star Citizen is that people wanted a living world to exist in and live their digital lives. What they will get is a space fighter combat sim, and some ‘open world’ stuff with some exploration, mining, and PvP. It simply cannot live up to expectations, wishes, and hopes. That’s going to be its failure – it will just be a video game, not a new online world and life for people to live and explore. Great graphics are meaningless in a world with few features or options. Might as well play single-player offline games.

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Oleg Chebeneev

SC will be a video game.. Amazing observation! Im just curious what makes you think that every backer is planning to abandon RL and play SC 24/7 like its new reality?

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Joe Blobers

Quote: “Great graphics are meaningless in a world with few features or options. Might as well play single-player offline games.”

Good points. Best graphics without gameplay are useless. Confirmed in many past very pretty games.
SC gameplay are starting to be implemented in upcoming patch and for those looking for a single-player offline experience, Squadron 42 is single-player.

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Schmidt.Capela

Non-instanced housing is one more reason for me to not even bother playing the game online. I really dislike competing with other players for housing spots, to the point I will pretend the game has no housing system if the housing isn’t instanced.

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Tee Parsley

Live in your ship! It’s what real spacers do!

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Ken from Chicago

Han Solo, Chewie, Lando (for a time), Starfleet officers on most Star Trek series lived on their ships, that dude in the SOLO had an entire penthouse apartment–and tower–that was a starship.

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Rhime

I wholly disagree. Player outposts and eventually small cities are going to be a big reason to “live” inside the game world with economy, salvage and exploration. Immersion is key to SC’s attraction.

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Ken from Chicago

Also, it spreads players out so they aren’t all exiting their instanced housing in the same spot. Plus, it mimics real life real estate. If a lot of players like an area, prices will go up.

You could have gameplay of “flipping” housing. Buy low, sell high. Do some grinding and/or crafting to add features and then sell it folks who like the new features but lack time or skill for the new features.

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Robert Mann

Competition for highly limited spots, I agree. Having open non-instanced housing without the specific placement issues… I have yet to find a game with appropriate land to player ratios that has a problem (so long as they have rules like “Don’t build at X point and block spawn points, quest givers, etc.”)

I much prefer wide areas with free building, in quantities where the vastness negates any feeling of competition. They can even be pushed through to a different set of zones (although I then want reasons to visit housing and such zones), and done with a lot of proc-gen.

That’s not to say every game should go that way, but I remain by the idea that variety is what will keep the genre from rotting. We need lots more variety, and a complete quash of the whole “Every game, my way” thing people do.

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Loyal Patron
Armsbend

What do you mean compete? Just whip out the credit card. You win.

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Bruno Brito

Just like real world!

Refreshing.

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Joe Blobers

… or grinding hundred’s of hours solo or with Org Whatever match your RL ability to play more than a few hours per week.

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Loyal Patron
Armsbend

I’d ask you what the video said Mr. Daniel – but I wouldn’t ask you to waste your valuable time wasting it on another hour long video detailing a clear scam – any more than I would watch 3 seconds of the rotten tripe that is Star Citizen myself.

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ghostlight

If not an out-and-out scam, Star Citizen is very much shaping up to be this generation’s Daikatana.

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Tee Parsley

And this generation’s Freelancer/Digital Anvil.

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Bruno Brito

I feel lucky. I didn’t pay a dime for SC, yet i got so much content out of it that i should be paying them for it.

The drama is just delicious. Although it is quite a rotten tripe, it’s also a trip that smells like flowers to me.