Ship of Heroes works on its diurnal cycle, builds out missions, and deals with poaching

    
22

Yesterday, Heroic Games’ Casey McGeever posted up the September to October milestones for Ship of Heroes, providing a bit of a roadmap for the next steps for the game. The next thing you’re likely to see, apart from continuing work on cars and civilians as chronicled last week, is the state of the diurnal cycle and a video showing it all off. A login test is also on the way.

Unfortunately, it sounds as if poaching is a bit of a problem for the company. “We’ve added another highly skilled senior artist, but lost one as well, and had a third shift to part time,” McGeever says. “This is a steady trend for us because we see the same thing happen again and again — larger studios see what we are doing and recruit our devs to work for them. We manage around this trend. Right now we are speaking to four potential new devs to add to the team. All of the key slots are filled.”

Finally, the mission system is underway: “We’ve been coding and testing elements of the Mission System, beginning with Invasions.” Expect player testing on that to begin following the login test.

22
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
TheDonDude

Hopefully they combat poaching via offering better pay and work environment rather than nasty contracts or something like that.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
mysecretid

I’m still not clear on why the Ship Of Heroes devs felt the need to set their superhero game on a starship?

To create an automatic level of separation from other superhero games? Somebody wanted to make a superhero game, and somebody else wanted to make a science-fiction “generational starship” game, and they compromised?

It’s always sort of puzzled me. I’d expect that one would want to make a superhero game setting as broadly archetypal as possible — but that’s only my perspective.

Merely wondering, not criticizing anybody,

Cheers,

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

I agree but I’m willing to suspend my disbelief.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

Its attempted creative “lore” behind the technical, artistic, and design short comings.

“How do we explain why ever brick in this wall looks 100% identical and like it just rolled off the factory line?” = “Its a artificial system maintained by bots on a spaceship!”

“How do we explain the boundaries surrounding each zone?” = “its on a space ship… City of Heroes already took the ‘its surrounded by a protective force field’ idea!”

etc etc

I mean… wait.. no…ignore the man behind the curtain… nothing to see here.

Reader
Utakata

It’s like I asked in WoW the other day how my Rogue can Sap a mob in flight and yet it doesn’t fall out of the air. None of my guildies could answer that question. Least with Ship of Heroes, they’ll have better answers. o.O

(To be fair though, that’s probably not why they named this hero based MMO as such. But it does conveniently make good excuses for the mechanical sticking points. :) )

Reader
Duane_Does_not_check_email

It is awful lore. Terrible.
I still look forward to launch and a better name for the product.

Please, pretend you want to attract more than former COH players.

Reader
Hirku

I agree, it kind of spoils the appeal of playing a superhero because the folks flying around in tights seem like small potatoes compared to the ordinary human engineers smart enough to build and maintain a city-sized spaceship.

Reader
Ken from Chicago

There’s an automatic in-game reason built into the lore for keeping everyone in the city instead of arbitrary invisible walls that CHAMPIONS ONLINE, DC UNIVERSE ONLINE, MARVEL HEROES and CITY OF HEROES have.

By designing the ship like a giant NASA rocket and then having various decks stacked vertically it builds in different levels of difficulty from one level to the next as you literally ascend through the ship.

By designing the ship to actually fly through space, you build in lore reasons for various events, visiting planets, docking with other ships, being invaded by attacking ships, etc.

Yes, SHIP OF HEROES does allow the devs to change up the setting from merely yet another superhero game set in a city to a superhero game AND spaceship traveling game.

It only seems “odd” because it is truly new. It’s like when people struggle to define STAR WARS as “science fiction” or “fantasy” because it has traditional elements of both. That which is truly new will often feel odd. It’s like many people automatically assume an rpg is a fantasy rpg game while a science fiction game must be a shooter–because that is soooooo common a trend. When one breaks the mold it can take some time to mentally accept it.

It’s not your fault. It’s just human nature. People from Europe struggled to accept the Great Wall of China or Asian firearms. People from the Americas struggled to accept Europeans in giant ships wearing metal armor. Seventeen years ago, people around the world struggled to accept the Twin Towers being deliberated crashed into almost simultaneously. Half a century ago, people from the Allied nations struggled to accept the discovery of and existence of concentration camps. Over half a century ago, people struggled to accept the entire world could literally be at war and soldiers struggled to find out the very air they breathed could be poisoned. Even now in a world of so much rapid-fire technological change, people struggled to accept the actuality of self-driving cars, the hyperloop, the rise of electric cars, people in actual flying suits or even that a group of plucky reporters of mmo games refused to accept going quietly into the night and banded together and raised funds to continue their ongoing mission to report about mmo news as fairly and openly as they could.

Yes, sometimes new can be very, very bad. It’s why so many people dislike the New, dislike change, because all too often the change is for the worse. But every so often, change, the New can be oh so good. The challenge is to, while rightfully rejecting some things that are new because they are bad, that we don’t throw out things that are good merely because they are new.

Reader
Magnus Itland

Originally, they seemed interested in blending two genres. But as the city building progressed, we have heard less about the whole IN SPACE thing, instead it seems now to be an excuse to create expansions for various planets where the ship will be stopping periodically, creating recurring events.

Notice that the ship is absolutely gigantic, so everyday life during the space travel will be pretty much like in any other vaguely futuristic city-based game. At this point, the whole IN SPACE thing looks more like background lore and to keep the door open for infinite expansion (if there are customers for that).

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
mysecretid

Thanks for the insight, Magnus.

That’s probably part of where my confusion came from — the whole “in space” aspect seems like such a significant alteration to the archetypal urban setting one tends to expect from superhero stories (comics, games, movies and television) at first, that you begin to wonder “what made them want to add this — what makes it important here?”

But as you say, the more I look at Ship Of Heroes‘ starship setting now, the science-fiction context seems more like background lore.

It’s a shade of stylistic difference added to what will essentially be a superhero game, when all is said and done.

Cheers,

Reader
Crowe

While I’m not keen on the concept of the ship in space, to change the underlying premise and name at this point would be a bad idea. It would be very difficult for people not regularly following to keep up with the change and they’d risk losing some of the reputation and community goodwill that they have generated thus far. So give me a decent game at launch and I’ll play along with the silly name/concept (and if it’s any good, I’ll promptly forget my original objections!).

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
mysecretid

I think we’re of the same mind on this one, Crowe. Give me a fun game, well-made, and that will be what matters most.

Cheers,

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

In a cyberpunk future, poaching involves hiring runners to sneak into an corporate arcology, ‘kidnap’ the property(people), and spirit them away to another corporate arcology where they will maybe, perhaps, possibly, be treated better…

or not.

But who cares, at least you got your cred stick filled.

Reader
Ken from Chicago

People aren’t property. They are not owned by a company. Ergo, they can’t be “poached”. They were given job offers that they accepted.

Pepperzine
Reader
Pepperzine

Exactly. The word poaching is inherently negative in its perception. People climbing the career ladder and advancing to better opportunities and pay should not be lumped into negativity.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Neurotic

Hello Ken! Sounds good, however this restriction on the use of the word “poaching” does not exist. Your logic is sound, but it’s false, you see. People and objects both can be ‘poached’, and this has been the accepted usage for many, many decades. Oxford lists 4 definitions for the word, one of which is “take or acquire in an unfair way.” :)

Reader
Ken from Chicago

What is “unfair” about offering people a job? The vast majority of people who are offered jobs ALREADY have jobs and by this definition it’s “unfair” to offer a job to anyone who is already working.

I disagree with the “unfairness”–and so does the law. Tech companies, such as Adobe, Apple, Google and Intel were sued for breaking the law by having “anti-poaching” agreements to not recruit each other’s employees–which *unfairly* restricted job opportunities of their employees.

But if you think it’s “unfair” that people should be able to work for a company that’s hiring, thus increase their own value when negotiating their pay, then fine. That’s on you. I disagree. And you have every right to disagree and feel it’s “fair” for companies to lock in employees by not even offering them work.

http://fortune.com/2015/09/03/koh-anti-poach-order/

Reader
Loyal Patron
Neurotic

This is a unique and entertaining interpretation of both ‘head-hunting’ and ‘poaching’ in their modern contexts. Brilliant! Bonus points for being willfully wrong-headed and basing your entire reply on a false premise. :)

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
mysecretid

Hey Neurotic!

As you suggest, the English language is constantly changing, adapting, and evolving, even on the most official or “canonical” levels.

Words change and add official meanings all the time (official = the Oxford English Dictionary, still regarded by scholars as the final authority on the English language worldwide — and yes, before anybody pre-emptively goes there, the OED does track American English variants).

Part of the reason why English remains the “trade language” of planet Earth is that it is extremely adaptive, and constantly adds, borrows, or steals new words, terms, and meanings as its users employ them constantly enough to earn them official status.

As an example, the word “environment”once used to refer exclusively to a fenced-in animal enclosure. Only later was the word appropriated to also mean one’s surroundings, and/or the natural state of the planet Earth.

Both usages are now regarded as linguistically legitimate, even though the former (original) definition has largely fallen out of use.

Cheers,

Reader
Loyal Patron
Neurotic

Yes indeed! Language is a fluid thing, and many of our hooman languages are composed of bits and bobs from various other languages. This is one of the fun things about linguistics — tracing the origins of words and discovering different, discarded meanings and so on. This is also why I adhere to the OED, as it does give very good etymological hints too. :)

Reader
Magnus Itland

“Poaching” is not what Heroic Games calls it either, they actually seem happy that their artists are good enough to get recruited by established companies.

Reader
IronSalamander8 .

Yay to all the cool stuff! Boo to the poaching! (Although companies have been luring talented people away from competitors since Ugh liked Gorg’s fire making skills for a rival tribe and bribed him with a custom club, still not a fan).