Valve’s Steam store has been challenged hard by Discord now, not just Epic

    
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If you haven’t noticed lately, the discontent over Steam’s profit split with creators, the overabundance of trash games, and the whole mess with moderation (or lack thereof) has opened a door for competitors to take on Valve’s financial juggernaut. Both Discord and Epic Games are making moves this month in the hopes of drawing players’ attention — and dollars — away from Steam and its tempting seasonal sales.

Discord announced this week that it will “allow all developers to self-publish games with a 90/10 revenue split,” which is much more generous than Steam’s current 70/30 structure. “No matter what size, from AAA to single person teams, developers will be able to self-publish on the Discord store with 90% revenue share going to the developer,” the company promised.

As for Epic Games, the studio is sending the millions of Fortnite players through its now-growing digital storefront, with its 88/12 split, every day. While it’s still in its infancy, the Epic Games store has some serious potential considering the built-in fanbase — and free bi-weekly game giveaways like Subnautica don’t hurt either.

Source: Discord, Epic Games. Thanks Kinya and Serrenity!
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Dankey Kang

I’ll stick with Steam, cannot be arsed to switch between 3 different services just to play my games.

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Lateris

I’ll sick with steam but I do feel they could adjust their sharing for devs.

anarresian
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anarresian

I wish them good luck. But is Discord’s store DRM-free or DRM-optional, or something?

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Michael18

At its core, this is an attempt to roll back some of the consumer friendly moves Valve has done over the years: no player reviews, no ratings in general, no stats, no frequent extensive sales, no refunds, … And, as usual, some consumers even applaud these changes.

At the moment, the Epic Store is aggressively anti-consumer. Literally the only reason for buying a game over there is exclusives, the fact Epic pays a ton of money to remove those games from other stores.

Also, people talk a lot about new competition for Steam. If Epic’s strategy is successful, it isn’t primarily a threat to Steam (Valve can fight back with Steam exclusives), it’s a threat to smaller stores like GoG.

Xijit
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Xijit

GOG will never die as long as they hold to their values.

Every year I buy a hand full of titles from them just to toss money in their face, most of which never even get installed, and I am not alone in that practice.

The only thing really buy from Steam now a days is the survival sand box stuff GOG can’t carry because of their DRM rules & VR games, which GOG doesn’t carry … yet (Wishful thinking that they notice there is a hole in the market for non-denomination VR titles).

anarresian
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anarresian

Indeed you are not alone in that practice.

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Michael18

Same here. I have bought quite a few games on GOG even though I had them on Steam or elsewhere, before. But I’m afraid if PC games stores are entering a phase of aggressively fighting each other with exclusives, this might hurt GOG badly. GOG can’t sell the Ultima 1-3 collection more than once.

Xijit
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Xijit

If it comes down to that, all CDProject has to do is make Cyberpunk’s PC release GOG exclusive.

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kgptzac

Buying games with the the intention not playing them is one way to paint an inaccurate picture of how good or bad a game is, and it’s not a practice that results in better games being made.

Xijit
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Xijit

It is GOG: half of what I buy on there is stuff I owned / played in the 90’s, and the rest is either Genre games where I know what I am getting into (like JRPGs or adventure titles) or epic shit that I play compulsively (Like the Witcher or Shadow Warrior).

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Sana Tan

I doubt that these new competitors will have the same options of payments available for my country that steam has. Also Steam offers prices for our country a lot more cheap. Not even GOG is so convenient for us. So yes, I will keep buying through Steam. All competition is good for us consumers anyway.

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Baemir

Same, Valve might seem greedy to devs but to us thirdworlders they actually look quite considerate. They also support Linux which is another thing that very few for-profit companies are willing to do. I don’t believe for a second that Epic or Discord are more pro-consumer than Valve, and I’m not a dev, so…

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Crowe

While I empathize with developers over splits like these… the dev/pub relationship has existed as long as I’ve been playing games (40+ years). I’ll buy through Steam but not Epic or Discord. If you make the choice to multi-publish, I’d cheer you on! But I’m not buying your game if I can’t get it direct or via Steam.

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Diego Lindenmeyer

go 100% to developers them, i dare you xD
gonna stick with steam anyway

MrEllis
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MrEllis

You can’t beat Steam at it’s own game. At this point, you have to plan for the future and target younger people just coming into gaming. I’m not going to forsake my entire Steam library of hundreds of games because you have the latest, exclusive, 8-bit, BR, rouge-like, indie game.

And if everyone is gunning for exclusives and publishers are promoting their own titles through their platforms, soon there are hundreds of launchers used to pitch exclusives with no real competition among them. So in the end no real incentive to offer deals when the dust settles. Every storefront sits on their hands hoping they score the next viral hit. This isn’t good for consumers, it’s good for publishers if they score a Fortnite and maybe good for a few devs if they get lucky.

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Chosenxeno .

Steam offers more visibility so Smaller Devs will still want to go there because it makes sense and it’s not like we are going to see better prices because of this.

I’m all for competition but only when it benefits THE CONSUMER. There is no proof that this will in anyway benefit us. Gains are usually concentrated at the top these days. Everyone wants to be a fat cat.

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Sorenthaz

Yeah basically it’s both Discord and Epic trying to capitalize on their high volume of users (where Discord is essentially THE online chat hub thanks to Microsoft committing suicide with Skype and Epic… well, they’ve got Fortnite) and turn them into longterm customers who stick on their platforms.

Twitch has tried to do something similar but that obviously doesn’t seem to have stuck, even when they give free games out via Twitch Prime and whatnot. Only real reason I use the Twitch app is for managing WoW addons since they gobbled up Curse.

Alex Js.
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Alex Js.

Twitch has tried to do

Bad example. Twitch is an incredibly mismanaged company (I’ve been an active user since 2011) who can’t seem to do anything right and only reason they still exist is lazy streamers who are afraid to jump to other platform ;-)

Alex Js.
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Alex Js.

I mean, it all depends on individual developer. If the developers will get more revenue because they have to pay less fees – it may encourage some of them to lower the price, at least on the platforms that take less fees. Or, for example, it may allow developer to put more revenue into hiring more people to fix bugs faster or to develop next game faster, which will benefit consumers even if the price will remain the same.

Sure, there’s no guarantee that any of the developers will do that, but hey, doesn’t mean that it’s a possibility that the companies like Epic or Discord should miss.

MrEllis
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MrEllis

If I can move 20k copies at 30% I’m happier than moving 1k at 10% is what it will break down to.

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Baemir

I don’t understand why all of a sudden journalists are demanding to see “moderation” in Steam. You can already block people if they’re trying to harass you. Is that not good enough? Is this about defending yourself, or is this about getting rid of communities/users you don’t like?