Tencent introduces strict rules for streamers playing its games

    
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Oh, yeah, this is fine. It's fine. It's fine! This is fine.

Good news for Chinese streamers, as gaming giant Tencent has introduced a new set of rules about what streamers can and cannot do while streaming their titles! Wait, that’s not good news. It’s arguably bad news, as the dozen rules include a few rules that make a certain amount of sense (no promoting cheating software or violating the Terms of Service) and other rules that are both broad and absolute in their potential implementation (violating Chinese cultural values is also a no-no, which includes bringing up things like religion or politics).

This is not entirely surprising, however, as Tencent has already been doing its best to get out ahead of changing Chinese regulation, with experiments on locking kids out via facial recognition technology and expanding child blocks across its various titles. The aim seems to be to make sure that children are not exposed to inappropriate content across a broad spectrum, which could be argued to be a noble motivation; the implementation, on the other hand, still leaves something to be desired.

Source: Gamasutra

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Kayweg

None of us knows where stuff like this will lead to in the long run.
I just know i don’t want to be there.
I’m not naive enough to believe that this will forever be a chinese-only thing, and that our constitutional rights in the west will protect us indefinitely.
We’re not nearly worried enough yet about news like this.

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Armsbend

If I were a handsome Chinese boy trying to live my life – I’d be locked up in the re-conditioning boot camp pretty quick. It must be so much pressure just remembering what you can and can’t do all day.

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BoxPressRadio (Acefisher1)

I don’t believe the rules around what you can talk about while streaming will be able to be enforced in the US. Freedom of Speech laws prohibit that sort of thing, as well as fair use laws in tandem. Seems like this will just create a nightmare for platforms like Twitch and Mixr to have to respond with their own policies in some manner, likely before they are prepared to do so properly. While I understand they have their EULA that you agree to, this doesn’t extend to your actions outside of the game itself. While they reserve the right to ban your account for any reason, even just because they dislike you, I’m sure, this doesn’t mean they have any real form of recourse other than banning an account of someone in the US.

As far as requiring facial recognition to play a game, well that’s just a great way to be sure you don’t need to ban anyone, as there will likely be nearly no one interested in jumping through that hoop for anything.

Essentially, it sounds like they were either ego-drunk on money and thought they could impose hilarious restrictions without consequence, or they are totally beholden to make a public attempt to comply with the Chinese Government, likely knowing these rules won’t be enforceable in most places. Either way, it looks really bad on their part, but was probably a necessary step for them to continue printing money.

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Armsbend

If you haven’t kept up with Freedom of Speech laws with ongoing Twitter, Google controversies you’ll know that the Constitution only protects the government not impeding your freedom of speech. As long as a company doesn’t discriminate according to sex, religion, race, etc – they can control the speech on their property. same as you can do in your business or home.

tencent can put “we can control what you say when you stream our game” in a tos and it would likely hold up. Or it has so far.

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BoxPressRadio (Acefisher1)

They have no legal recourse. They can only ban your account.

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Bryan Correll

And we make these rules of our own free will and not under pressure from the government, right comrades?

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PanagiotisLial1

Does anyone even want to stream for them under these rules?

Xijit
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Xijit

Tencent owns Epic, and thus Fortnight.

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PanagiotisLial1

Yes but from what I understand the rules are for chinese streamers, at least from what we can read above in the article. I dont see how chinese streamers would want to stream anything of theirs in such a restrictive way

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Armsbend

40% of Epic = therefore they are not run the company.