OrbusVR Reborn launches on April 23, will be an Oculus Quest launch title

    
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You know, the MMORPG genre doesn’t really get many virtual reality games, which is a shame – who doesn’t want the holodeck? But there are a handful of MMOs that have refused to give up on VR, and one of them is Orbus, or OrbusVR: Reborn as its final version is more properly known. Today, indie studio AdAlternum announced not only a hard release date for the game – April 23rd – but the fact that it’ll be a launch game for the Oculus Quest.

“As of April 1, the servers for the original game went offline, giving the development team time to focus all their efforts on fine-tuning the expansion before its launch. Part of that fine-tuning involves preparing the game to function on Oculus Quest. The Quest, an all-in-one virtual reality gaming system, will be available later this spring and is slated to have 50 titles at launch – among which OrbusVR: Reborn is proud to number.”

As we’ve previously noted, Reborn is an overhaul of the original Kickstarted buy-to-play VR game with a bunch of new expansion content bundled in too. It’s a free upgrade for everyone who already owns the title.

Source: Official site, press release
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John Mclain

If that’s the best anyone can do with a VR mmo, I’ll be skipping VR mmos for a while. I mean I’ve seen N64 games with more detail, and for once that’s not even remotely an exaggeration.

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Melissa McDonald

VR is nothing like 2D gaming. The amount of horsepower it takes is astonishing. That’s why the level of detail isn’t 2019 standards. Even so, this is simplistic even by 2019 VR standards.

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John Mclain

I’m fully aware of exactly how much additional power is required to render VR than a traditional single display monitor. I’m not demanding photo-realism or even basic 2019 graphics. But these graphics are so below-par it’s laughable. They can do far better with even the now outdated minimum VR graphics power of a gtx 970, let alone a modern 10xx series card, or one of these overpriced garbage 20xx series cards.

They should be aiming for oblivion/skyrim tiers of graphics, if well optimized, modern GPUs can do those just fine with VR.

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Robert Mann

Yeah… that’s nowhere near ready for many of us. I’m very much not a ‘graphics must be perfect’ person. I do tend to lean toward more realistic graphics… but at the same time I’m fine playing the old ‘not so well aged’, as people call them, games that aimed toward that.

This looks like a clunky mess to me. Worse, the animations seem to jerk fairly regularly there, on a trailer… imagine in a game with lots of players lagging it.

VR is a good idea, but it needs a lot of refinement yet. MMOs tend to be years behind the curve on tech, although occasionally they do something new and nifty. Combine a technology that’s a little too early, and the MMO tech-lag syndrome, and you get something that is of almost no interest beyond the “Someday something following this might be cool.”

Finally, there’s the cost and generation problem. There’s plenty of people who happily have spent several thousand dollars in this decade chasing the latest smart phones (not to mention service bills). I’m not one of them. I find so many other uses, that I feel are much better, for those thousands of dollars. Where I like new games, I would much rather put my money into something that will last at least a few years (whether that be a PC or even a console). A VR system right now seems to have a lifespan of about 2 years, that’s too short for my taste.

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Melissa McDonald

I definitely want the holodeck. But, I think Orbus, Skyrim VR, and current-gen are stepping stones to what I (and most others) actually want and envision.

I’m intrigued to see that the VR version of No Man’s Sky is getting rave reviews, however. And Linden Labs (makers of Second Life) are just getting going with their new VR platform, Project Sansar.

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cursedseishi

who doesn’t want the holodeck?

I mean… I think at some point some series of Star Trek were at least half “Holodeck goes awry” and the other half “everything else”, and there usually isn’t a Star Trek series without at least one major “oopsie” in there either… Then there’s the holodeck in The Orville, and outside of two episodes I think every inclusion of it has led to either someone getting stabbed in their bed, getting addicted to a use it provides, or a combination of the two. Or, in one episode, a literal horror house that also nearly kills someone…

Oh, and any anime about a game. Because those games practically devolve into “Now you’re trapped here, deal with it or die” with differentiating levels of simulation from the “hey I can smell stuff!” to “dear lord why would anyone try and recreate this?!”.

Much fun as it would be, the last thing I’d ever want is to put my head in some VR headset, and then live out the rest of my life trapped in an early VR MMO where sure things look nice but they are also clearly stylized. Or learn how the fist of that stylized floating tree/rock thing feels as it’s hitting my face…
… Or dying to a rabbit in the game, and that being on my gravestone.

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Robert Mann

Okay Mr./Mrs. literal. All I can say here is that the shows also manage to regularly pick rather stupid courses of action, have everything work out fairly well, and only engage in such issues due to the need for some plot device to work with. It’s about on par with ‘beam me’ issues. It works, until they need something to not work for a story.

As to the game anime thing, well, if that did happen this would not be my choice either. XD Again, however, it’s a plot device. If they didn’t get trapped, there was no such story, and then we are in a different genre of anime.

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cursedseishi

I… know…? Literally zero need to tell me that, when that is the entire point of the post–which was not a serious comment, if you missed that. The entire joke was about how one could be excited for something that, whenever it is shown to a significant degree, fails in the absolutely worst way possible.

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Robert Mann

Sarcastic styles don’t translate to text well… so no, it didn’t resonate as a joke there. Sadly, there’s no tone without something to set it or express it. Without tone, you can intend a joke or sarcasm as much as you want, but it won’t come across consistently.

All you had to do was note that it was. Explaining it further then leads to… “I… know… now.” in return. *Ideally noting beforehand avoids the entire issue.*