The Daily Grind: Do you actually feel as if you’re part of your fave MMO’s community?

    
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Last month, when news of the City of Heroes mess hit, the Massively OP writers and readers had multiple discussions about community – you saw some of the results in Into the Super-verse. Obviously the story has since moved on from that moment, and most of the community is coming together again. But while it was all happening, one thing that kept coming up was the realization that everyone has a very different idea of what the community in a given game actually is. Confronting that, I suspect, was at the heart of why some former CoH players reacted so strongly to the whole ordeal.

As MOP’s Tyler Edwards noted, he stopped going to events in one specific live MMO when he came to realize that they were really about the cool kids “showering each other with gifts and attention and the rest of us were just there to provide an audience.” I was dismayed to catch a glimpse of that in CoH: I didn’t want to feel that some folks were supers, and everybody else was that NPC you bump into when you’re trying to superspeed down the street. I want to fight against that as hard as necessary.

Do you actually feel as if you’re part of your fave MMO’s community? And how would you define it?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

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Anstalt

The community is simply all the players on your server

Feeling a part of that community comes down to interacting with it and contributing to it in some way.

LotRO is where I felt most part of the community. I was a “leader” – I’d form and lead pugs all the way through the game, I eventually became guild leader and I was our raid leader for nearly 5 years. I was very close with everyone inside the guild, but also had tons of connections outside the guild. I enjoyed the PvP and so interacted with that section of the community a lot. I also joined in a lot of the player-organised events on the server.

SWTOR is where I least felt part of the community. The small group sizes, trivial content and lack of group content meant you rarely interacted with other people. Add to this the low player caps in each zone and it meant you rarely bumped into the same people and so never developed connections. The low player cap also prevented player-organsied events because you’d all be stuck in different instances. The massive decline in population and 2 server merges in the first year didn’t help things much either……

In the end, it all comes down to the game’s design. Modern MMOs are not designed for community. Most aren’t even massively multiplayer. Convenience has replaced community, to the detriment of all, leading to massive churn rates which led to exploitative monetisation.

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Robert Mann

Very rarely. Then again, when half the community is bad/foul jokes and being terrible to others… I want no part of that.

There’s simply very little reason in most games to care, and those games where people do (a few notables already mentioned) are exceptional mostly because they have drawn a crowd of passionate people who are focused on the community being friendly. It… isn’t because of the game, that is to say, but because of the people in the game. *Note, I define community as actually having some impact upon people beyond disgusting them with foulness here. I’m not a fan of the “If there, part of community” thing. Because it makes community a useless term here. It’s like saying every human on Earth is part of your community.*

I’d love a game that really pushed the idea of being part of a bigger community well. However, that bucks the trends in almost all manners. It cannot be PvP focused, because that inherently means attacking others and running insider/spy missions is the norm. It cannot have people able to do everything, because then there’s no reason to care about the other people. It cannot be combat focused alone, because then people will either split into their little groups or just do lower difficulty stuff. ETC. What I imagine is something so different to anything on the market… that publishers would blow their heads like it was the hot new trend of volcanic self-annihilation!

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Pandalulz

Nah, but it’s all me. If I don’t talk to anyone, maybe they won’t talk to me.

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Suikoden

Yes, because the Project Gorgon community is amazing. Remember the early days of MMOs, before all the queueing and zerging? When you made friends with people, not just in your guild, but in the game world? That’s what the community in Project Gorgon is like. It’s like everyone just wants the best for the game and they are all happy you are there to enjoy it with them.

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

Yes, because my favorite MMO community is right here. *cuddlestab*

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Castagere Shaikura

In the early days of MMO’s yes not so much today.
In LOTRO back at launch, I was in a guild with 5 real life friends called Honor and Glory. I wasn’t even interested in the game until my friends talked me into it at the local pub. We had Teamspeak too. The minstrel class sounded really cool to me so of course, they were all for it. Game needed healers. But the class did damage while buffing and healing. Very fun class to play.

I was leveling up and got to a point where I had to quest in this dark forest. I forget what it was called. It had elite killer trees in it. So I need help to get through it. That’s when I met the kindest older couple in the guild. They were in their 60’s and loved Lord of the rings. They knew all the history. They helped me get through that whole zone and cheered for me as a leveled. I will never ever forget them and they’re just being like the guilds grandparents. If they ever need help the guild would drop whatever they were doing.

Joined a guild in ESO and quit it 2-days later as I was treated like crap for being the new guy by some of the members. And was told to save my gold so I could pay the fee for posting items on the guild trader. I laughed and told them to kiss my butt.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

ESO trade guides are awful. Nothing like a job for your free time.

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Oleg Chebeneev

In WoW not just a part. On frontlines!

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

Raid guild? How’s raid development/dynamics these days?

I must admit the shadow priest dance was looking pretty sweet last expansion. I almost got back into it, but I haven’t been able to slog through the level grind in the BfA. I’m just completely done with filling out quest cards.

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Fred Douglas

Yeah, because it’s so small. Play Age of Conan long enough and it feels like small town America, not unlike Robert E. Howard’s hometown, I suppose.

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Nate Woodard

I have recently joined a guild that makes me feel a part of the guild going out of their way to include me in stuff and teaching me things that I hadn’t considered or cared about in the past. Does that count?

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

I think it counts as the best part of it. Congrats, truly.

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rosieposie

Nope, because I don’t want to be a part of anything involving human beings other than myself. In MMO communities, Hell truly is Other People.