The Division 2’s first raid won’t have matchmaking, to the community’s dismay

    
15

It seems that the The Division 2 community is in a bit of an uproar the news came out that the game’s first raid, which is slated to open its gates today, will not provide matchmaking, instead requiring players to form a premade group of eight if they want to try to tackle the challenge. This might not be a problem in and of itself. After all, The Division’s fellow MMO-ish shooter Destiny provides no matchmaking for its raids, and players have gotten along fine (even if an in-game group-finder has been one of the most-requested — and neglected — features throughout its lifespan). The real problem is that an earlier promotional image for The Division 2 claimed, “Matchmaking is provided for every game activity and difficulty level,” which is obviously no longer the case.

Content Lead Hamish Bode addressed the community’s consternation in today’s weekly State of the Game stream, saying, “We do understand people have pulled up things we’ve said in the past about this subject, so here’s where it’s at in front of me right now, verbatim,” before reading the studio’s official statement: “We decided to not include matchmaking, a we don’t think this would make a good gameplay experience for random groups. The Raid will test your ability to communicate well, have a good build set up and will require great teamwork to beat encounters.”

True though that may be, players nevertheless feel that Ubisoft has reneged on its earlier promise. Although the devs don’t seem keen to change their decision anytime soon, Live Content Manager Yannick Banchereau has said, “We’re happy to keep the conversation going and see how it goes and how people like it and whatever […] and then depending on how the conversation goes, we will make adaptations.”

Meanwhile, for players not currently busy trying to gather up a group to take on the raid recently received two new missions to play through — provided they’ve purchased the game’s year-one season pass, that is. The two so-called Classified Assignments provide more narrative than loot, but players who want to learn more about the post-apocalyptic world of The Division 2 should find plenty to sink their teeth into.

Source: Kotaku (1, 2). Thanks, Bryan!
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Grave Knight

So a game mode that few will participate because there isn’t a matchmaking system. Cool.

Reader
Fred Douglas

Odd decision. It’s basically an open world lobby game, not having lobbies in the most significant content is peculiar. And if it’s too hard for PUGs, you need to make it easier, and offer difficulty tiers.

Mewmew
Reader
Mewmew

Oh The Division 2 – you were doing so well up until now. You were the standout of the recently released co-op shooters. I guess that couldn’t last forever. You had to do some backwards thing to tick a bunch of people off and go directly against your own word for what the game was.

Auto matchmaking is a promise you guys made for all game activities.

“We decided to not include matchmaking, a we don’t think this would make a good gameplay experience for random groups. The Raid will test your ability to communicate well, have a good build set up and will require great teamwork to beat encounters.”

Too bad, that’s up for the players to decide. People who want to set up their own groups can’t if matchmaking is there? Oh no wait, they can! So leave matchmaking in for the people who care to use it, which is most of the player base. Going against your own promise and marketing materials, well Anthem and Fallout 76 are happy you are doing that anyway. They’ve got a seat saved for you next to them in the club. Enjoy.

Veldara
Reader
Veldara
Godnaz
Reader
Godnaz

The Division 2 crowd is so socially awkward. I’m is a large clan and most of the members don’t even use voice comms. So many people just want to solo or pair up that it’s difficult to LFG for content where you can get enough to commit and trust it’ll get completed without issue.

ihatevnecks
Reader
ihatevnecks

Yep, but they knew this going into it and this is the exact kind of thing they built the game around. Every activity you can do (except side missions, sort of) has a matchmaking queue associated with it. That’s the game they built, so it makes no sense for the raid to come out and suddenly break that paradigm.

Mewmew
Reader
Mewmew

You’re a social master because you use voice comms, the same way PvP players are tough guys because they go against other players in games.

Sorry, but I take offense to calling people “socially awkward” just because they prefer not to use voice comms. It spoils my experience. I don’t want to talk nor do I want to hear other people talking when playing games from home. And yeah, part of that comes from some horrible experiences on console voice chat growing up, but part of it is that it just spoils my gameplay and isn’t fun for me to hear or partake in.

I think that even if I hadn’t had horrible experiences on games voice communications that I wouldn’t want to partake in voice chat. To me it’s not a social thing, it’s just the way I prefer to play.

Reader
Randy Savage

They should’ve just made two difficulty modes. One for random matchmaking and one for coordinated teams. Instead, they opted for false advertisement.

Reader
Anstalt

I don’t know where I stand on this one.

On the one hand, they’re following typical MMO design and making the raid both the largest group size AND the hardest content. It stands to reason that PUGs will have a hard time, if not impossible, completing the content and so it makes sense that it won’t be included in the matchmaking system because they don’t want lots of people having a bad time dying over and over.

On the other hand, TD2 is not an MMO. The heavy instancing means you don’t naturally bump into the same people whilst you’re playing the game. You don’t have that repeated contact that you get in proper MMOs and so you don’t form social bonds with other players. This means the average TD2 player won’t be playing this content because they don’t have 7 other reliable friends playing the game. If they do get to play the content, it’ll probably be a pug that was put together in the white house and so it’s just as likely to fail as if they’d been put together in a matchmaking system.

I personally won’t be playing the content. I stopped playing once I hit GS500 because I couldn’t be bothered with a long gear grind. I’d already completed all the content, why bother grinding out gear?! I was going to come back for the raid to see what it was like but as I played the game casually, I’m not in a clan and don’t have friends playing the game so I’d have to join pugs, or commit to a clan just to try out this one bit of content.

Veldara
Reader
Veldara

By design and this is the designers own words is to make the raid so punishing and requiring coordination that voice and mic are required. It’s also to avoid people from being kicked in the end which happens very often with pugs.

That said they do plan a solution to make those that like pugging experience the raid. This tells me they’ll have a dumbed down version of it with lower gearscore loot.

Reader
Hikari Kenzaki

On the surface, I can see why it would be a lose-lose to not include matchmaking.

Though, me personally, I dislike group finders that the game then has to spend a huge portion of its time incentivizing people to queue up.

It’s actually not that hard to find a group of 8 like-minded individuals who actually talk to each other. City of Heroes Task Forces are teams of 8 and those pop off faster than you can say “Still got room for a Brute and a kin Def?”

ihatevnecks
Reader
ihatevnecks

I don’t really think the two are comparable.

City of Heroes was a PC MMO with open zones, various zone and world based text chat channels, and individual servers. The same players you saw running around (and played with) today were the players you saw tomorrow, next week, etc.

Div2 is none of that. The open zones are single player unless you’ve done some kind of matchmaking activity. There’s no zone chat, no text chat at all. Unless you’re playing with a group of friends, all of the social play happens with completely random PUGs. You only ever see those people once, because you’re in a global pool of players rather than on a single server with a limited population.

Even the big clans are primarily comprised of people joining for clan features and weekly rewards rather than the social play aspect.

The whole game is built around and hyped itself on supporting matchmaking activities with a group of strangers, so it shouldn’t be any different with raids. They’re taking the Bungie/Destiny way out by forcing you to use third-party/outside-game apps to find a team for part of the game’s content, as if the people you find in those apps are some higher caliber of player than the ones you’d find with in-game tools.

Reader
Hikari Kenzaki

Odd because I see all sorts of people in the safe zones who can talk to each other anytime.

But as I said, it’s a lose-lose for them, so they might have well just put it in to get one win.

Reader
Indigo Salma

They are already getting torn apart by the community cause of this.
Really fun to look at since i really hate the absence of matchmaking.