Destiny 2 won’t be exclusive to Steam: Bungie reveals new details about the game’s future

    
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Following Bungie’s bombshell E3 announcement that Destiny 2 will be departing Blizzard’s Battle.net client for the greener pastures of Steam — and going free-to-play in the process — on September 17th, the devs have come forward to clarify some additional details about the transition and hint at what lies in store for the future.

For starters, it appears that Steam may only be the beginning, as Destiny 2 General Manager Mark Noseworthy has revealed that the game won’t necessarily be exclusive to Valve’s platform: “[W]e do want Destiny to be a game where you can play anytime anywhere with your friends, and be able to find it in multiple places, so it’s totally conceivable that someday we’d be on the Epic Games Store and other launchers in different regions,” Noseworthy said. And that’s not all; Noseworthy has also confirmed that, in addition to the cross-save feature that will arrive with the game’s Steam launch and free-to-play transition, Bungie is also interested in implementing full-on cross-platform play, though it’s not on the immediate horizon as the devs “have a lot on [their] plate to chew through first,” he says.

With such big changes ahead for Destiny 2, many players are also wondering what new content awaits. Obviously there’s Shadowkeep, which will release alongside the Steam launch on September 17th, taking players back to the moon to take on a whole new slew of interstellar terrors, but what lies beyond 2019? According to Noseworthy and Game Director Luke Smith in a recent interview with Kotaku, that all depends on how the rest of the year pans out: “It’s hard for us right now to predict what we’re going to do in 2020, because we’re changing a bunch of stuff in 2019, and part of being a live service game is: put something out, test it, learn from it,” adding that if players like what they’re doing, they’ll keep at it, but they’re ready to change and adapt if necessary. If you want to know more about the future of Destiny 2, you can check out the whole, hour-long interview over at Kotaku.

Source: VG24/7, Kotaku
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Bannex

D2 is actually a great game surrounded by I think the exact kind of publicity that chases gamers away. This game should be more popular than it is imo.

That said it’s a ghost town on PC right now which is unfortunate because the game really thrives on an active population.

Hopefully, the expanded access will help.

In my opinion, they should focus on listening to players and giving as much as they can to their fans while avoiding the predatory pricing moniker in an effort to bolster the IP prior to D3.

Destiny is a successful IP and if they do it right D2 could be a hype machine for D3.

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3dom

Hopefully they’ll be smart enough to add third-person view outside of sword usage. They’ll need those cosmetics sale money after going indie.

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nomadmorlock9

More options are better and I like where Destiny 2 is headed. As long as all the options patch correctly and on time..

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Arktouros

I’ve never really been interested in these kinds of shooters but I’m always for ubiquitous access to products. Let people decide where they want to get your product on the platform that works best for them.

If you want to take exclusivity money, then you won’t be getting any of mine.

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IronSalamander8 .

My thoughts as well. I love shooters but not so much these games as service ones, I’m more concerned with the exclusivity issues that have cropped up on PC lately. Go ahead and sell your games on platform x but don’t ONLY sell it there.

laelgon
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laelgon

I agree, though I think the most vocal people haven’t been doing much to improve the discourse. A lot of the “EPIC BAD!!!” people complaining about Epic’s exclusivity deals were totally silent about all the exclusive titles on Steam. Reasonable criticism and concerns are being overshadowed by the fanbois who have some weird loyalty to Steam, not unlike the people who take the PS4 vs Xbox nonsense too seriously.

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Arktouros

The key difference in those scenarios is that Epic is basically buying out products that already were going to be on steam, or plan to be on steam at a later date, purely because they paid for exclusivity rights. That’s not illegal, and you can do that, but it’s being a dick and people are going to call you out for being a dick. The fundamental, lynch-pin difference here is the plan is to take Epic’s money for an exclusive platform launch and then still release on Steam later anyways to get paid there. It isn’t taking a stance against Steam’s policies or trying to create better market competition, it’s just wanton greed trying to get as much money as possible. In fact it stifles competition because Epic doesn’t need to do things like invest in making it’s store a better platform because it instead just throws that money at developers for exclusivity rights and now if players want that game they have to come through Epic to get it.

If Steam was buying exclusives away from other platforms I would be equally criticizing them as well. However as first seen with the Oculus Rift vs Vive and now with the Epic Game store, Valve has shown they don’t really want to “compete” like the consoles did with each side buying up/out exclusivity deals because that’s not what they’re about.

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Tizmah

I think most people really don’t care. We want a game, we buy it. We don’t care what store front.

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Arktouros

That’s certainly what gaming developers are hoping is the case.

Personally I get most people don’t care. They want a game, they buy a game. Ethics and morals who has the time, they just want to have some fun.

Of course that’s how you end up with loot boxes and microtransactions crammed down our throats constantly but hey, those people just wanted those games regardless of what impact that attitude has on things.

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Tizmah

Yup that’s why we still have them. Then when there is backlash, governments get involved and make everything worse for everyone. Then, in the end, microtransactions, loot boxes, exclusives, etc will still exist.

I mean, we have a game industry where work crunch time is normalized. And you have Nintendo making the news about Animal Crossing being delayed because they care about their employees and want to keep their employees happy.

But Shenmue 3 did some shady stuff to its backers by going Epic exclusive. Is it shitty? Yes. Am I still going to buy Shenmue 3 from Epic when it release because I’ve been waiting 18 years? Yes.

plannick
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plannick

the big difference is that epic pay people to make the game exclusive (or maybe even anyone but valve), whereas devs pick steam due to for things such as steamworks feature (workshop, crap drm, big pipe, big audience). devs are free to have non steam versions, but often don’t because they can’t be bothered to do multiple versions or don’t want to go without certain steamworks feature.

seriously, can anyone state a game that valve pays to have on its platform exclusively?

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Кристалл Величия

Couldn’t be more agree