Crowfall promises to appeal to the full Bartle spectrum

    
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Almost every MMO player has heard of Richard Bartle’s Taxonomy of Player Types. You know, it’s that chart where gamers are segmented according to their primary activities, such as killing, achieving, socializing, and exploring. It’s a tried-and-true model that, while slightly simplistic, still aids developers in creating online products that appeal to the widest possible range of gamers.

The team at ArtCraft has these categories in mind as it continues to create and refine Crowfall. No matter which category appeals to you the most, ArtCraft promises in a new post that there’s something in this upcoming PvP game for you — and at least one other player type who will aid you in your experience.

For example, explorers should have endless lands to roam: “Since Crowfall’s Dying Worlds are dynamically-created to be different when the world resets after each Throne War campaign, there will always be new maps to explore and conquer.” Of course, it’s hard to overlook the fact that killers will be catered to the most by the fact that this game is designed around heavy, non-stop PvP.

Source: Crowfall

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Randomessa

Like every game that has forced PvP content, that’s a no from me dawg.

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Richard Bartle

This looks like the kind of thing where Bartle gets the blame if it doesn’t work out.

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Crowe

Absolutely!

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Sray

The most successful multiplayer games today focus on doing one thing, and doing it well. Telling players “we’re going to do a whole bunch of things so that everyone can have something to do” is the opposite of what is working across the board for the entire industry right now (and it works for good reason). I think this sort of statement is the wrong message: they should be saying “here’s your place for RPG styled PVP; that’s what we’re serving up and if you’re not interested in that, then go away”. This “little bit of everything for everyone” message is wishy-washy.

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Robert Mann

Same old MMO genre, still trying to please all the people with conflicting interests and promising that “We will do it really well this time, serious!!!”

Yep. Never works.

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IronSalamander8 .

I doubt they can achieve that. I’m huge on explore, some achievement, some socialization, and very low killer and no game has ever managed all 4 very well.

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Robert Mann

I can think of a couple single player games that came closer… but none of them work as well as those that specialize. Agree!

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Brown Jenkin

So far I can see lots of this. The killer is obvious given Crowfall’s focus. PvP games tend to be much easier/clearer to design for social play so I’ve little doubt of this realm either. The randomized(ish) nature of world design is an amazing aspect of Crowfall’s design for exploration focused players, every guild will want some really… what I’m not seeing so far is anything for the achiever crowd. That crowd tends to traditionally be really focused on PvE accomplishments, it’ll be very interesting to see how/what the content for this crowd ultimately looks like.

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lostkoss

At the start I think the Achievers will be the worst off. There will be the Eternal Kingdom and decorating that might appeal to an achiever, especially if winners in the Throne War can earn special rewards to display. It will be achievements through the other roles for sure though, either by combat or discovery or crafting.

Covynant001
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Covynant001

So many developers don’t seem to understand, when trying to make everyone happy they very often end up making no one happy.

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lostkoss

Artcraft has been very clear about their vision from the start. They haven’t been shy about saying Crowfall is a PVP game and will not be for everyone.

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Sray

“They haven’t been shy about saying Crowfall is a PVP game and will not be for everyone.”

And yet here they are saying the opposite of that. I think that games focused on one particular type of gamer are a good thing, but this sort of quote feels like they’re moving away from that; or that they think they can attract a bunch of “sheep” (I hate that term for non-PVPers, but it fits in this scenario). Either way, it’s the opposite of their original message.

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Akagi

I’m Explorer and the only MMO that did it for me was Vanilla WoW.

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Richard de Leon III

As an avid anti-pvper, I think Crowfall is one of those games thatll be more fun for me being viewed on twitch rather than actually playing :). At least itll be more fun than Eve with its time dilation stuff….

Alomar
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Alomar

Wow, I love referring to PvPers as killers in an rvr/pvp driven game.

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Richard Bartle

I’ve lost count of the number of articles that imply PvP is content for killers. Killers are people who get fun from imposing themselves on others. PvPing is an activity that can be enjoyed (or not) for a number of reasons of which pissing off other players is but one (and a minor one at that).

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lostkoss

“Of course, it’s hard to overlook the fact that killers will be catered to the most by the fact that this game is designed around heavy, non-stop PvP.”

Artcraft has always said this is a PVP game all along.

That is the endgame. Fighting over the randomly generated dying worlds for dwindling resources. Then that world dies and a new world is spawned to fight over.
They have the endgame as the main point of the game. Now every improvement, expansion or update has a goal right from the start of the games design. Every skill has a place, with plenty of room to add more.

They have already talked about adding to the PVE offerings and addressed it for now. There will be creature lairs to clear out, at first. They need to finish the base game, the PVP Throne War, then the sky is the limit on what they can do to improve the experience.

For now though, there will still be hidden places that need discovering, there will still be resources that will need gathering, there will still be nests of monsters that need be rooted out. There will be spies and double agents and scouts and politics and intrigue. There will be crafters crafting. There is going to be a whole game here for people who don’t want to just bash skulls on the front lines 24/7.

Think more like EVE PVP.
You PVP when you want to, and though you might get jumped anywhere, people mostly go about their business. As long as you don’t wander into the wrong neighborhood at night, you are mostly fine. Sometimes you will just get swept up into it and have to roll with the punches. It is all part of the game.

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Bruno Brito

You PVP when you want to, and though you might get jumped anywhere, people mostly go about their business.

Translation: People police themselves.

Yeah, i’ll stay clear of this one, but hey, hope you all have fun.

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Robert Mann

Translation 2: People run around attacking other people as the primary activity, with effectively infinite respawns to ensure that any attempt to do anything else is as miserable as possible.

The idea that people will police themselves is one that has been done to death. The only thing it has proven is that societies have laws and rules for a reason… and that being able to enforce them is a must for anything other than absolute chaos.

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Bruno Brito

Which brings me to the problem:

Why is a game that catters primarily to PvPers want to catter to PvE players? I mean, really, why? PvP gankboxes are NOT pleasant experiences for PvE players.

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Robert Mann

Numbers. PvE players vastly outnumber PvP players in most titles. The exceptions are the big PvP genres of the day (moba/BR/shooter/whatever next). Also, targets. Because most of the ‘PvP’ players really want to just stomp somebody into the dirt without a fight, it seems. The idea of actual battles in most of these games is a farce.

However, all the companies also want the e-sports money, and most of the developers have personal interest in PvP centric gaming. So they stick to it. They also need enough people to buy in, because in general these games are locust fodder. They last 6 months with a surge of activity and then bleed out. A few manage to last beyond a year or so.

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Bruno Brito

But history tends to repeat itself. No PvEr wants to play a PvP gankbox.

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Robert Mann

But… they still get naïve ‘sheep’ and make enough to fund the next gankbox before things die. History repeats. Just like people keep buying games from companies that deliver half-developed products full of bad monetization that are reviewed as terrible before they are anything but a concept.

There’s a lot in history that shows we have some problems as a species with such things.