Steam is running a beta for its new library system starting on September 17

    
37

The current library for your games in Steam is… fine. It’s fine. It offers everything that you absolutely need in a library system. It also could run a lot better, which is why Valve is starting a new opt-in beta for the new library interface starting on September 17th. (It’s almost like there are suddenly new digital retailers in the PC gaming arena that might make Valve want to really re-evaluate whether “good enough” is good enough any longer; that’s an epic theory that might sow some discord, we know.) This test is available to everyone with an account, so you don’t need to worry about any sort of special access, but there are numerous features that may help players remain engaged with their respective collections.

Of particular interest to MMO players are the new Event systems (allowing the library to point you to titles which have special limited-time events running or otherwise could use extra attention), the landing page that reminds you if anything has recently updated, and checking what games your friends have been playing recently. It’s a good way to keep your eyes on the overall cadence of what’s going on with gaming, but it also gives useful tools for staying connected with your friends. It’s a multi-function update, in other words.

37
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

The best thing from this is that I can finally search my lib by tags. Don’t even care about the redesign, but not being able to scroll through only my Management games always infuriated me.

Reader
EmberStar

I looked at the list of proposed changes. My main concern? How do I disable all of them. I can’t see any of the proposed upgrades that would be of any use to me at all (and I strongly suspect that integrating them will break something it turns out I do use.)

See what my friends are playing? I have two Steam friends. One is a streamer that I added because they invited viewers to join them in a game. And it turned out being on their friends list was the only way to join their lobby. I’m constantly surprised to notice that I haven’t been deleted from their end. The other Steam Friend passed away several years ago.

If I’m actively playing a game, I already know about patches (because I see them listed in the “Downloads since the last time you restarted Steam” section.) And I’m either already aware of in-game events, or probably don’t really care.

Steams “recommendation algorithms” already irritate me, because I don’t have any control over what criteria it uses to form recommendations. Three of the games in my library with the highest Played Time are Borderlands 2 (multiplayer, online), Ark: Survival Evolved (multiplayer, online, PVP) and Warframe (multiplayer, online, free-to-play.) I play Borderlands 2 and Ark exclusively in offline singleplayer mode. I mostly play solo in Warframe, simply because I prefer to explore the maps and smash all the boxes and most players want to finish the mission before it finishes loading and extract so they can go again. And Steam constantly recommends games to me on the basis of being Online, Multiplayer, PVP and Free to Play. Exactly the qualities I’m NOT looking for in new games.

Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

I think you can remove the tags to keep them from being recommended to you. I’m pretty sure I did something like this to hide all FPSes, but I can’t remember where this config is.

Reader
EmberStar

Blocking the tags nukes *everything* with those tags. If I blocked “multiplayer,” it would eleminate like 70% of the games on Steam. I don’t want to block everything with PVP (as noted, two of the games I’ve spent the most time playing are technically PVP games. Just not when I play them.) I just don’t want Steam *weighting* the recommendations towards those tags. Basically, I want something between “shower me with everything!” and “Show me NOTHING.”

Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

Yeah, they could add a “relevancy” slider or something like that.

Reader
Michael18

At first I was excited when trying GOG Galaxy 2.0, earlier this year, but then I realized they are using web site scraping to get the data about your libraries, so you have to give those “community provided” plugins FULL ACCESS to your Steam, Origin, Ubi accounts for Galaxy 2.0 to work. Have uninstalled it, for now. Hope they find a better solution (unlikely because EA, Ubi, Valve will probably not cooperate) or maybe I’ll have a closer look at those plugins once it fully releases.

Reader
EmberStar

I got around this with GoG Connect (where they sometimes give you the chance to claim a free GoG copy of a game you own on Steam) by switching my Steam Library to “anyone can view,” letting it scan my library and claiming the games, and then switching my account back to hidden and private. I’m sure some bot somewhere instantly scooped up all my data the instant it was visible. But actual humans still only have about half an hour to snoop through my player profile before I turn the cloaking device back on.

I’m not sure that would work with GoG Galaxy. But I don’t plan to use it, so it really doesn’t matter to me right now.

Reader
Robert Mann

Just so long as they keep a basic library that works as is, without worrying about the social functions or limited time events, I’m fine.

Gog 2.0 is of far more interest, and Epic can still go die in a fire for all I care. I will NEVER support active purchase of exclusives. I haven’t purchased a console in a long time… I’ll quit playing first. Just like I do when game monetization irks me.

Reader
Akagi

I’m not very impressed. The new way to preview news posts by the game developers is really bad. Before you could scroll below and read the comments, now you have to go to the forum discussion, what’s worse is that “mouse middle click” or “right click -> open in new tab” doesn’t work, so now you have to lose where you were, read what you want and come back. If I could open in new tab, I’d do it and come back to where I was by just closing that tab.

Really stupid design. Updating things (and breaking them) for the sake of updating them, stupid developers.

Reader
Fisty

Looks like the stuff I never click on in Discord.

Reader
Fervor Bliss

Does Steam still have the zero-day exploit?
Uninstalled it.

Reader
zaber

I think so but only on Windows

Reader
EmberStar

What is the “zero day exploit?” I hadn’t heard of this before.

Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

It was the one that any application could use Steam to gain privileges on the user’s machine. They dismissed it as non-applicable, but was proved that it works.

Anyway, I’ve heard they patched it out… I think twice? (The first time they said it was fixed, actually wasn’t)

Reader
Loyal Patron
Neurotic

I’m in the GOG Galaxy 2.0 beta, and I have to say it’s pretty damn good.

Reader
Lethality

Amazing what a little competition from Epic and GoG will do. Go figure.

Reader
Rodrigo Dias Costa

Not really from GOG, but from Discord (they sell games too, and have a pretty huge install base, also have some exclusives, but most people for some reason just bash Epic for doing this)

Reader
tiltowait

Fixing the family sharing is all I care about. As it stands, if I’m running game A, I can’t share/run game B on a different PC in the house (like my steamlink machine).

Because of that, I try my best to avoid buying steam games. If I get them any other way, I can run the game I OWN on a pc of my choice.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Alex Willis

…except, you don’t really “own” it. You own access to the game.

deekay_000
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_000

yeah unless you’ve created the software yourself and not under some fairly standard employment contract clause that spare time work IP without a waiver belongs to them you’ve probably never owned a piece of software in your life, games, operating systems, apps, w/e. (i mean you could always pay someone to make a website for you that you’d own the code you commisioned usually, if not necessarily the entirety of everything used in the creation of the website if you use anything third party which is also common).

and it’s not necessarily a bad thing. i don’t want to have to learn code to update windows myself for example. society has benefited immensely from software licensing and software as a service – which is not to say there has not been downsides with likely more to arise in the future.