The Daily Grind: Are you still on board the Kickstarter MMO train?

    
65
Nope.

An interesting thing happened when Justin put out his list of Kickstarted MMOs that raised the most money; the comments pointed out that the majority of those games were still in ambiguous development states, with a minority in release and only a couple that could really be considered fairly successful with a launched product. And that’s not counting the numerous Kickstarted games not on that list but either outright scuttled (Embers of Caerus) or weakly limping along (Pathfinder Online). And it’s not counting how many games that seem to be going decently in development also turned to additional funding. (We count all of those in Make My MMO!)

From one perspective, this could be a sign that Kickstarter doesn’t really work for MMOs as a funding approach. However, you could just as easily look at it as a situation wherein Kickstarter gets the ball rolling, and it’s up to the actual team to keep it rolling, providing at least a chance at these titles going into real development when they otherwise wouldn’t have even had that. So are you still on board the Kickstarter MMO train? Or do you feel it ultimately didn’t go much of anywhere?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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flying_dutchman

I don’t think its failed, so much as it’s given us a glimpse of what happens when people try new things. The reason we’re getting so many reboots and remakes of movies is because movies are expansive and no-one wants to gamble on something new.

Kickstart allows companies to go off on their own and bring there own ideas to life. This lets games get created that never would have gotten off the ground. However, we also can see WHY they would have never gotten off the ground. Some of the people running these KS’s have no business in game design. Some of the games being pitched are just bad ideas, with little to no marketability. Some are straight up scams. Some are well meaning dreamers without the ability to move a project forward in a timely manner.

I think kick starter as a whole is positive for the industry , but you also have to keep in mind that these games had to go to KS for a reason. They aren’t sure things. in fact most of them are pretty huge gambles and like all gambling the vast majority of these projects will fail, or flop. That’s just the price of innovation.

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Reht

I am no longer on board with kickstarter for any video games, not just MMOs. Still use it for other things.

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Kickstarter Donor
Brazen Bondar

I think I’m done with the KS train for the moment. If a major MMO game that was kickstarted actually releases successfully, I may reconsider. Very few indies seem to be able to manage the process well.

Vaeris
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Vaeris

I’m out. I’ve KS a few and none of the ones that I’ve interest in panned out the way I wanted or got the necessary support they need to be all they planned. It is what it is, but it has now prevented me from any future backing. I’ll pay when you launch…and not “soft launch” or “early access” or any other label applied. A good old fashioned launch date as defined in the first generation of MMOs, thanks.

And it sucks, because I want to contribute to Pantheon to see it succeed and make launch but I know in the grand scheme the couple hundred I’d donate aren’t going to make or break the game. So I’ll just have to wait and see if it’ll make it. Que sera.

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Deadly Habit

I’ve learned there’s a reason why publishers and actual investors want nothing to do with these heroes of yore in gaming who prey on people’s nostalgia and lack of anything original in the market. Funny how they always cast blame on them as the bad guys, but never take accountability when their own independently run companies and games crash and burn.

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

There is a certain cost to innovation that the risk-averse avoid. Still, they prey in turn upon those studios and rely upon them to catch the next big thing. The game is the game.

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Deadly Habit

Or they just demonstrate the problem without people reigning them in both in finances and feature creep/over promising and under-delivering, only they can’t blame the evil companies for their own failures anymore.

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

I’m not necessarily “on board” with any part of this carnival busk, whether it’s sanctioned AAA venture capital or fools throwing money at an egotist, but I also don’t much care how the developers get paid to give me the next iteration toward a virtual online world so long as they aren’t exploiting the innocent to do it.

Outside of my cynicism that we’d mess it all up, I’m not opposed to the idea of regulating crowdfunding. If the rights to CIG’s development work (in the event of Star Citizen’s hypothetical failure to launch) were awarded to the stakeholders who donated to fund it, then we might actually see value grow out of that. If regulation just becomes a way to close off innovation outside of the corporate cartels, then I’m very much in favor of the status quo.

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Kickstarter Donor
mysecretid

There aren’t many MMORPG Kickstarters going right now which catch my eye.

As this website has observed, MMORPG games in general are a harder sell right now, and there aren’t a lot of A-list projects on offer these days.

But no, I was careful backing games before, but I’m even more careful now. Too many projects which promised much, but delivered poorly.

I’ve mentioned before that I only backed Star Citizen for what I could reasonably afford, because one of the best things my Pops ever taught me was “Never risk, lend, or gamble money that you can’t afford to lose”. So I didn’t take a hit there, thankfully.

That said, I no longer follow Star Citizen, beyond our own Deekay‘s in-game reporting posts, and I no longer expect the game to launch any time soon, or in any condition resembling what was promised.

I’ve backed a couple of single-player games recently for small amounts I can afford to lose, but I haven’t seen an MMORPG project which fills me with the desire to crowdfund in quite a while.

rafael12104
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rafael12104

Deekay is my only source for SC news and info. I trust him and he at least post relevant info, not those fancy pressers and demos with eye chart graphics.

oldandgrumpy
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Kickstarter Donor
oldandgrumpy

Mostly listen to guard frequency myself for space game news etc.

http://guardfrequency.com

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Loyal Patron
jay

I feel like for MMORPG’s kickstarters are more of a way to show investors that players are interested in their concept rather than fund the game it’s self. It’s hard to sell investors on MMORPG’s in the current game design space, as their money is almost guaranteed to see better returns, & be seen as a safer investment, investing in other avenues; such as console games, mobile apps, and small single player games.

I would be interested in seeing a MMORPG team that took this to heart, and instead of having $35-10000 pledge tiers. Just have a single $5 pledge tier. Just enough for players to say “yes, I am interested in this concept”. So that the developers can take that kickstarter to investors and show the interest in their concept in raw numbers.

oldandgrumpy
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Kickstarter Donor
oldandgrumpy

Not any more. SC, Repop and Pantheon saw to that.

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sirradoria

I leraned my lesson with star citizen. Never again