The Daily Grind: Which MMO studio would you like to see make another MMO?

    
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Try this again.

Every MMO studio has its own particular style and flavor. You can argue that the game itself matters more than its point of origin, but that doesn’t feel completely right; for better or worse, no one other than Carbine Studios would have made WildStar, you wouldn’t expect World of Warcraft from a team aside from Blizzard, and it’s pretty clear that CCP Games is very much the sort of place that makes EVE Online. And that also leads you to some expectations about what a game from a studio would look like: Even if both CCP and Blizzard had a license to make a World of Darkness game, they’d produce very different MMOs.

But let’s put the license and IP to one side to ask which MMO studio you’d like to see make another MMO. Sure, Blizzard may have consistently not done this for many years, but maybe you’d like to see it take on a second full MMORPG. Or maybe you want to see another title from Daybreak or find out what happens if Grinding Gear Games switched those gears to working on a full MMORPG. Don’t worry about the setting and all that, just figure out which studio you’d like to see in the driver’s seat for this sort of speculative venture.

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

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Vaeris
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Vaeris

Any studio that is committed to a subscription-based game. The way I see it any and all time taken away from figuring out how to monetize bits and bits of content is extra time spent on making said content, available to all who subscribe, that much more refined.

There’s a reason most people prefer salary work as opposed to hourly. Having a guaranteed income prevents worrying about times when you can’t make it in. If devs aren’t focused on making the next pixel widget that will entice people to buy it all the while not throwing gameplay out of whack, just seems to be less “bad” stress which can hamper creativity.

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Teh Beardling

I would like to see riot take a stab at it. They have the money to do so, the fan base to support it and i feel the worlds lore is flushed out enough to provide a good setting. They have all the races/factions already designed as well. I may not be the biggest fan of league itself, i hate top down/click to move, but thier world building and story telling has grown immensely in recent years. Plus they have yordles and im a sucker for cute fluffy things.

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Bluxwave

I would like either Egosoft or ID software to make an mmo pweeese!

Or Star Vault mortal online type game with the skill they have or Age of conans Funcom dev team

Sadly there are very few experienced MMO devs.

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Stormwaltz

Standing Stone. I expect anything new from them would embrace LotRO and DDO’s old-school principles of content design. A theme park, yes, but with an open-world map and crowded with small, thoughtful design features.

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partiesplayin

Instead of picking a studio id rather envision an old game redone with modern graphics and lessons learned .. Star wars galaxies 2 , Star trek online 2 , Archage 2 , Guild Wars 2, Lord of the rings online 2. Those games redone with all the great quality’s people loved about them with new ideas mechanics and gameplay rather then modifying the games engine that it barley works, create a new game engine from scratch to handle it from day 1 with the idea of bigger and better, but also giving the community the things that made the originals so good just expand upon and improve them but above all else make it “FUN”

MurderHobo
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MurderHobo

I’m not looking for a studio. I’m waiting for a technology to free us from the studio system. I’m not looking for a breakout MMO, but a breakout engine and toolset available to the Commons.

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Rodrigo Dias Costa

CCP. An MMO with the kind of economy EVE has, but in another setting. That would be awesome!

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Zero_1_Zerum

None of them.

Unless, the game didn’t have P2W, or even better, no cash shop at all.

No F2P, no subs, just B2P. You buy it, you get the WHOLE ENTIRE GAME.

Cosmetics are unlocked by playing the game, earning achievements, crafting, and finding rare items, NOT BUYING THEM FROM A CASH SHOP.

Houses, you have to learn the architect or builder job, and design and build your own house. Same goes for furniture. Or, trade with other players, for houses and furniture. No buying them from a cash shop, either.

Huge open world sandbox, populated by many factions, the power dynamics and alliances of which fluctuate over time, NO PERMANENTLY LOCKED FACTIONS.

Also, only consensual PVP, NO GANK BOXES. That way, PVP can be in the whole entire game world, but PVE players like me don’t have to participate.

Basically, what I’m saying is that I want a game that no MMO game dev would make, because they all want to milk whales for everything they’re worth.

MilitiaMasterV
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MilitiaMasterV

Going to have to say I mostly agree with this comment. After bouncing around trying out numerous free trials/F2P games, I’m becoming inured to these types of ‘give us money because we have our hands out, not because we created something nice’ mechanics…

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Teh Beardling

I just wish games would decide on which they want to be. Sub or cash shop. I know they need steady income to keep server quality up and new content in the works but nothing grinds my gears more than double dipping.

kjempff
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kjempff

{jumps into a time machine and jump back a few years or an alternative reality}
Kloud Umpurium Games: “We realized with all this money, we could build the biggest and best dynamic virtual world mmorpg ever seen. Therefore Stör Citation is cancelled and we are going to spend the money on something great instead. This will be even better than EqNext.”

Joke aside, the mmo studio does not matter, maybe even the bigger the studio the more chances that it will fall into the negative mmorpg mold. If the people with the right vision and the people with the money get to agree on a good format, it may happen in any studio.
One thing though, it can not be lead by a film/narrative focused studio, it has to be people who understand that they are making a game, not a story, and that they should give players the freedom to play the game, not the narrative. They need to understand a mmorpg players mindset and that their reasons to play are completely different than players who play other kinds of games. And this is why most of the current studios are more or less disqualified by default, unless they create a completely new team without internal influences (this is unlikely to happen).

kjempff
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kjempff

And what I mean by this is that the people within these companies with the seniority and experience to lead such a project are all made from the current batch of mmorpgs, and their mindset is formed to think in a certain way – They will not understand how to create a virtual world mmorpg with freedom and with minimal/open narrative.
In a big studio, these people will not be put in a role to only act as experienced support for some outsider that has the right vision. They worked their way up and can not be dismissed like that.

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Sorenthaz

Can’t really think of any now. Cryptic can do good ideas/etc. but there’s a lot of F2P messiness with their stuff. Blizzard would take forever to put a new MMO out and they’d inevitably start watering it down for mindless casual play with each expansion.

I’d like to say Turbine, but by that I’d mean the old Turbine who did LotRO. I’d like to see them give an MMO similar to that another go with modern graphics, systems, and improvements. But that’s unrealistic.

I guess in the realm of realism, the only studio I’d really be interested in seeing a new MMO for is if Yoshi-P and his team. It’d be cool to see what they could do without the restrictions of rebuilding a failed product in a (relatively) short time frame.