Chronicles of Elyria starts selling $75 Longest Night advent calendars

    
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There has to be a measure of masochistic joy in stocking up account items that you can’t use (yet) for a game that is not out (yet). But if this sort of activity is satisfying to you, then you might want to check out Chronicles of Elyria’s calendar sale because this is going to dump a whole lot of pretend stuff (for now) into your account’s coffers.

The Longest Night Calendar is basically an advent calendar and lockbox rolled into one. You buy either the $60 or $75 (on sale through Monday) calendars not knowing their contents, only that you will be assured a much greater value than what you paid. The fun begins when the calendar starts depositing an item into your account every day or so next month.

“Beginning Wednesday, December 11th and going until Tuesday, December 31st, each Longest Night Calendar held in the inventory of an account with an Elyrian Package or higher will deposit an item into the user’s inventory every Elyrian month (every 28 hours) with a value ranging from $6 USD to $30 USD, while each Premium Calendar will deposit an item ranging from $10 USD to $40 USD,” said Soulbound Studios.

Source: Chronicles of Elyria. Thanks Dro and Pepperzine!

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2Ton Gamer

This game raked in quite a bit of KS money so why are they still trying to fleece people for virtual crap and showing Commodore 64 graphic tests as a reward for people that sunk money into this? Here come the “but it’s pre-alpha graphics and not optimized fanbois in 3..2..1..”

Seriously though, when is enough going to be enough for these snake oil salesman charlatans to make people see that they are just paying for them to remain open in some sort of capacity while they dick around and look for new ways to rip players off and bring the KS platform to the joke level?

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Armsbend

It looks like Shroud of the Avatar has passed on the torch to a worthy heir of developer and consumer depravity.

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Dro Gul

Walsh in his State Of the Studio a few years back “However, as we reached the end of 2017 it became clear publishers were disinclined to take the risk on an innovative game such as Chronicles of Elyria without changing our intended vision. Some publishers wanted micro-transactions, loot crates, or other features that prioritize revenue over player experience. None of these options are in the best interest of our vision or players.”

Today they are trying to argue that these $95 lootboxes are better value than the typical ones. What a joke. I guess his “vision” changed.

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Arktouros

This is why I stopped getting involved with alpha/betas/etc. So many games I’ve played over the last 5 years end up talking up one direction and when things don’t line up their tune changes real quick. Every “go their own way” Dev wants to proselytize from the mountain tops about how they’re going to do things the “right way” right up until that income starts to dry up then all that self righteous garbage goes out the window and you can see they’re no better than the publishers they demonize.

MilitiaMasterV
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MilitiaMasterV

I don’t think game companies understand how to make money anymore.

Provide a product people like, and they’ll spend freely on it.

Providing no product and expecting money? That’s a new one.

How do you get people in? Hype sometimes works, but that fizzles after awhile. You allow people ‘a taste’. You get them hooked in/enjoying themselves…then they stick around and are more likely to want to fund you, because you are keeping them entertained.

Personally, I don’t mind throwing down upwards of $200-300 (Would even consider a tiny bit higher) on a game for a LIFE TIME sub to something I enjoy. And I’m poor as a joke. But it has to be a game that isn’t trying to nickel and dime you, or that doesn’t try and put stuff behind barriers because you’re not ‘paying enough’ or they don’t consider you ‘loyal’ enough. Or these cash shops where they put in-game mechanics that allow you to earn it, BUT ONLY ON ONE CHARACTER and you’d have to earn it again/pay for it again for another character. (One reason I quit Rift after they did their F2P…as I realized I’d buy something and it would only go to one character…)

You can try and rattle us money trees, but our branches won’t break and provide you if you’re dumb about it…

The assumption that we’ll pay repeatedly for the same digital item over and over again? Yeah, no.

We’re paying for a product. A game. The ability to keep that game going so as to maintain our interest. We’re not paying for fictitious non-existent items/games that may never exist. (Yeah, sure some people fall for that, there’s a fool born every minute supposedly.)

Provide the product, and maybe you’ll make some money…

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Armsbend

“Provide a product people like”

This is what developers are incapable of doing now.

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Rodrigo Dias Costa

Yet there are consumers happy with this announcement on their forums… That’s actually how lootboxes became so popular, consumers were spending a lot on them, so the companies kept using this practice.

Also don’t misunderstand why lootboxes are starting to being refrained from games as an viable monetization option. This happened because some high profile games started using them while the games themselves were being considered of lower quality than expected at launch. If EA hadn’t messed up so bad on Battlefront 2, we would never see such an opposition on all fronts like we see today.

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P Jones

The best response on the official forums was a guy who explained that the people most likely to buy this $95 loot box were the ones that already had most of the items. And this was good for the poorer and less committed players because it will give the whales more items to give away.
Absolutely amazing lengths that people can go to convince themselves of something.

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Arktouros

Ahead of their time.

Don’t even have an actual game out released and selling dopes things in loot boxes under a different name.

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P Jones

This from the company that claims to have turned away publishers because they didnt want to taint the game with loot boxes. Now they launch a $95 one that you can get on sale for 3 days for just $75!

$95 loot boxes for a game that is in Dev only Pre-Alpha.

How sad.

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Robert Mann

Not exactly exciting, but… at the least these are not “Hey, spend $20 for a chance at something with a value between $1 and $50!” There are guaranteed minimum values, even if you have exceptionally bad luck, that are more than double the cost of the calendar.

On the other hand, the value of everything on their store (assuming they do make a product that is 100% viable in the end) is still fairly high to begin with, so actual value and value on their store is a possible contention point.

Further details from the posting are that those are sale prices, with the $60 going to $75 post the first few days, and the $75 going to $90. The minimum value guarantees are $ 175 and $ 275. Remember, that’s COE pricing, not actual value…

Pepperzine
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Pepperzine

Serious question, how can guaranteed minimum values exist at this point in time? I notice the clause at the end of your post, but I think it’s the most important part when it comes to this topic.

The value is assigned by developers as it doesn’t actually reflect the value and the market has yet to determine the true value of any of their products. For example, if the game never launches the value of all of the virtual items in the calendar is $0. If it does launch, the actual value of the items can greatly vary and is an unstable prediction.

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Robert Mann

Yeah, it’s apparently only guaranteed vs. the current store cost.

Still far less offensive than any lootbox to me, but… I’m also not about to buy one simply because of that. If it was a game that was out, I might consider it given such a guarantee, and assuming that I wanted things through a store purchase instead of in game play. Those are big assumptions. XD

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Arktouros

This still remains my #1 issue with Kickstarter games in general.

Most things in cash shops/games represent time. You buy a space ship in Star Citizen, it represents the time it’d take to generate the income to purchase the same ship in game. However they haven’t even finished designing the systems yet in most of these games, let alone rebalanced any of them, to really determine how much that is. Is me spending $100 worth 100 hours of farming money? Is it only 1 hour of farming money? There’s no context for the value of things they’re selling and more over they can and will end up tweaking those systems innumerable times.

The whole thing is just rotten.

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P Jones

Those are made up values for the virtual items. Why does item #1 cost $30 and item #2 cost $10? Because that’s what they typed in. Can I legally sell those items I got and actually get that cash value for them? If not then they have no value. If you think spending $95 to get random items is some kind of value proposition I do not even know what to say. And remember, we were told no loot boxes. Now we are being told that these are less offensive than usual. For $95. Gimme a break!