The Daily Grind: How much does fear of missing out motivate your MMO playtime?

    
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Big hall.

Here’s the reality about Ishgard reconstruction in Final Fantasy XIV. There’s stuff I want from it, I can do the crafting, there are many more rewards planned for it, I do not need to be in a rush to get all of the rewards right away especially when there are at least two more months before it’ll be replaced with any other forms of content. I can take it slow with earning rewards and enjoying the content, and nope apparently I’m making tons of ovens and earning scrips and hoping that some day I might get to actually take part in one of the crafter events for even more scrips.

As of this writing, my apprehension about missing out on this content is high, and it released yesterday.

The funny thing is that this is not unique. I’ve heard many people argue that the best time to play World of Warcraft expansions is late in their lifespans, when people have all the guides out and you can catch up pretty easily, but a lot of people want to be in on the ground floor for fear of missing something. You get people making characters on progression servers they’ll never actually play, or jumping in to try the newest update on something without actually being high enough to reach the new content. So how much does fear of missing out motivate your MMO playtime? How often do you find yourself structuring your time around things you don’t want to miss, whether or not it’s even something you can miss?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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GamingSF

FOMO relating to MMORPGs for me is less about the day-to-day things and more about game launches or expansion releases. Not getting in early enough can mean being left in the dust in zones overfull of mobs. Also dungeon groups may not be happening at a level you’re at if you’re too far behind. Some MMOs have level sync to combat the latter but the former is generally an issue. It’s just nicer to play with other players around even as background activity.

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Randomessa

I can usually be motivated to log in for dailies or battle pass tasks for approximately one week, and after that I not only don’t care, but will begin to resent it. This is actually how I burned out on Warframe, and so with Dauntless and Wakfu I just… Stopped. I’ll log in when I wanna, and do stuff when I wanna, and if I get a thing for it, hooray. Sometimes I log in after what feels like a day or two, and an event has ended and I either suddenly have my inventory emptied of tokens, or an inventory full of useless expired tokens.

Oh well. Couldn’t have missed anything important.

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jay

I used to really feel this way about EQ1 way back in 99-2005. If I didn’t log in and play daily I might miss those jboots, etc. In modern MMO’s I don’t feel this way at all. Often times I’m just like… meh.. don’t feel like playing today. Off I go to play some RD2, MW, etc…

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Zero_1_Zerum

I used log into ESO everyday for their daily rewards. But, the couple months before I had to stop playing because my computer broke, the daily rewards sucked, so I only logged in when I wanted to play.
Other than that, I haven’t had any fear of missing out.

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Schmidt.Capela

It influences a lot, but in the opposite direction: if a game makes me feel like I must log in and play in order to not miss out, then I instead stop playing. I prefer to play games that never make me feel pressed for time.

Like I often say, I utterly hate time-limited content.

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Anstalt

FOMO doesnt seem to have any effect on me as FOMO is all in relation to other people, and my enjoyment isn’t really based on whether others are also having fun or not.

That said, if I’m playing an MMO, I want to play it first / on patch day etc. This has nothing to do with other people having fun without me or before me, and everything to do with wanting to experience the content at it’s best. On launch day, there aren’t guides, walkthroughs, min-maxing etc, so I experience the content “fresh”. On launch day, the community is at it’s best, filled only with those who really want to be there, which usually means everyone is excited, helpful and social. Those benefits tend to outweigh the negatives of a few bugs or crowded zones.

kjempff
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kjempff

I am born before 1990, so I don’t have this fear of missing out, about anything.
I can even stop reading massivelyop; I just chose not to, but I could quit any day *twitch*

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Armsbend

It used to matter a great deal – now it is 0%. None of these knick-knacks ever mattered and matter less now that the quality of gaming has fallen so far so fast.

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dreamer

The more pressure a game puts on me to keep playing, the less likely I am to do so. It takes the joy out of it for me and turns it into a job. No thanks.

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Sorenthaz

Just depends on the game for me. FFXIV I grinded out the GARO stuff because it’d be going away forever, and it’s rare for XIV to do that stuff outside of the super casual holidays that don’t take much effort to get the rewards for, or their collab events that might take a burst of effort but are usually gone within a month.

If it ever gets to feeling like too much of a job/chore then I’ll usually just give up and drop it. As long as I’m having fun doing whatever it is though, then yeah I can be motivated by FOMO events/etc.