The Daily Grind: What made you drop a daily routine in an MMO?

    
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Boldly gone.

I like Star Trek Online. I really do. I like the whole meta-event stretching through its event that lets you pick up a free high-end ship by participating, and let’s not mince words here, I kept at this first phase of the event religiously for the two weeks necessary to get full event progress and unlock the rewards. Hooray for me! And then it came time to log in and do another event clear for more dilithium, and between anxiety issues and just general thought of the time spent I… simply could not do it.

Let me make it clear that this is not about time. It’s not that STO demanded too much time from me to do a daily task, it’s that it just kind of felt like more work than I wanted to do for this daily maintenance routine. The idea of hopping in and queueing for the task force just did not appeal. And that got me thinking about other games in which I had solid daily routines that just… dropped, at some point, usually less because I was having too much fun doing other things and more because the thought of doing even this little task was just too time-consuming. So what about you, readers? What made you drop a daily routine in an MMO?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

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kgrey38

I played Destiny 2 intensely for a few months and then dropped all the routines I’d developed in it, along with the game itself, pretty suddenly. I got tired of how nakedly its content is designed to demand as many hours as possible from players. More hours than possible.

Much of the content was, in fact, old content thinly (VERY thinly) repurposed into a new marathon of busywork. I found myself doing a lot of “kill 50 rats and bring me their tails” quests in sci-fi clothing, and not only that, they were on a brutally increased scale: more like “get 25,000 points killing rats” or “kill 200 rats using headshots from this specific weapon you hate.”

I got the sense that Bungie expects players to pick one aspect of the game to dedicate their leisure time to and completely disregard all the other aspects, e.g. keep up with Gambit and not Vanguard or Crucible stuff. But I wanted to experience the game broadly and deeply. Is that an unrealistic expectation? Not in most games I’ve played. The only other games I’ve played that were so insatiably voracious for my time were old-school grind-heavy MMOs designed twenty years ago.

There is always something going on in Destiny 2 that’s time-limited and exclusive, something that you’ll never have a second opportunity to do. The game depends on a constant cycle of FOMO to keep players engaged. An argument can be made that this is true of many games, and I’m sure there are plenty of games with similar…traits that I have not played. But again it’s a matter of scale and intensity, and more to the point, it’s a question of how I personally want to spend my time and in what manner I want to be persuaded to adjust how I spend my time.

I really wanted to love Destiny 2. It has a lot going for it. But it doesn’t want to love me back, it just wants to use me to fill its queues.

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creationguru

Fir me anything that becomes to feel like a job so if I get something from it that I think I is valie I will do it but really do not care anymore.

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Zero_1_Zerum

I stopped logging into ESO every day when the login rewards became crappy. After that, I logged in when I felt like playing.

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angrakhan

Combination of wife, kids, job, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Adulting, basically.

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Blake

For me it happens when that voice in the back of my head that constantly berates me with “Why are we doing this again you loser?” gets too loud.

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Bruno Brito

Maturity and adulthood.

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NeoWolf

Usually its dread of the monotony of the same again… OR some new and shiny came along.

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Armsbend

Same as you – I ask myself why I am doing this thing and then I realize it is ultimately pointless.

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Schmidt.Capela

The fact it’s a routine?

Trying to push players towards a routine is, for me, a loss-loss proposition. If I dislike the routine I will resent feeling pressured into doing it, and might even leave the game over that; if I do enjoy it, I will likely grow frustrated over not being able to continue doing the routine after it’s finished for the day, which will also reduce my enjoyment.

Besides, I will never prioritize a game above real world concerns, which means I will fairly regularly miss on daily tasks or events even if I want to do them — and if the penalty (or missed reward) for not doing the daily tasks every day is something I actually wanted, that alone can make me stop playing.

Thus why in an MMO I do whatever I damn please with no regard for what the devs want me to do, and in particular refuse to allow myself to fall into a routine of the dev’s devising. And why in offline games that work in real time I will manipulate whichever clock the game uses all the time, so real world commitments bring me no penalty, at all, to my progression or enjoyment of the game.

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Utakata

Usually new patches or expansions. And on the occasion, dropping the game for another.