Global Chat: Is Animal Crossing New Horizons an MMO?

    
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Global Chat: Is Animal Crossing New Horizons an MMO?

One trend that we have noticed over the past decade or so is the blurring of lines between “regular” video games and MMORPGs. It seems as though many MMO-like traits and design features are bleeding into the rest of the industry, which opens the door to argue that certain games are, in fact, MMOs.

So what about the new Animal Crossings: New Horizons? Everwake says that, yup, it’s an MMO: “There are real economic benefits to keeping a huge friend’s list. Selling each island’s unique fruit is a huge boon for cash. Furniture and clothing is randomized each day for each player. Additionally, I’m already seeing communities pop up again to take advantage of the game’s clothing and furniture editors. The decorating community in Animal Crossing is every bit as real as the one in EverQuest II.”

Read on for more MMO blog essays, including a call for a new Star Wars MMO, a celebration of EverQuest’s 21st birthday, and the desired return for WildStar.

How do I start to say goodbye.

Occasional Hero: I want WildStar back too. How could it happen?

“It’s clear that a lot of people loved this game and really miss it. They saw in it great potential, but felt it was wasted by the team that developed it. Is there any chance we could ever walk the surface of Nexus again? Maybe. All of the options are a long shot, but here are a few ways it could potentially happen.”

The Ancient Gaming Noob: EverQuest at 21

“What does it even mean when your game has retro-nostalgia servers that are over nine years old?  At least I will be able to write that promised final post about the server. Congrats to the EverQuest team for making it into another decade!”

MMO Fallout: The Division Warlords of New York is stupid garbage

“I think the thing that pisses me off most in The Division 2 is the laziness of the enemy design. Here’s how it works: Take a character and load them up with impenetrable armor, the kind you need hundreds upon hundreds of bullets in order to break. Give that enemy a flamethrower that can hit you from ridiculously long distances, one that breaks your character, causes damage over time, stops them from moving, and can virtually knock you out in mere seconds, and give that character AI that just lumbers around following you blindly. Throw it into an arena where there are constantly refreshing groups of foes coming to shoot at you from all sides and voila: You’ve got The Division 2.”

Sam’s Planet: Is it time for a new Star Wars MMO?

“Star Wars’ current MMO The Old Republic is not fulfilling all fans expectations. Player numbers are at an all time low and the experience of the game equates more to a single player story game with some multiplayer elements. Basically it doesn’t feel like you are a unique part of the world, it feels like you are at the centre of a preset adventure.”

Carl Tashian (via Minimalistway): How multi-user dungeons taught me to code

“It wasn’t until later, at 14, that I really got excited about programming. I became addicted to an online adventure game — a free Multi-User Dungeon (MUD) called HexOnyx. Hex was a popular virtual world with at least a hundred people playing at any given time. Though today’s MMPORGs host millions at a time, back then a few hundred people in one virtual space seemed like a lot. I made great friends there, and each night we’d battle vicious snarling wargs and Demons of Decay together in the dungeons and dark woods. The game was entirely text-based, so imagination was mandatory. Nearly 20 years later, I still have pictures in my head of some of the old stomping grounds in the game.”

Mailvatar: Designing good MMO PvP is hard but not impossible

“In my opinion, there are some MMORPGs out there that manage to not only provide open PvP for those who like it, but also give incentives for and meaning to said PvP without actually forcing anyone to participate in it. Are any of those games perfect? No, because nothing ever is, but they prove that designing good and meaningful PvP can be done without the game in question automatically becoming a ‘gankbox.'”

Every day there are tons of terrific, insightful, and unusual articles posted across the MMO gaming blogosphere — and every day, Justin reads as many as he can. Global Chat is a sampling of noteworthy essays, rants, and guides from the past few weeks of MMO discourse.

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Schmidt.Capela

Animal Crossing isn’t a MMO, but it’s a game that makes use of some MMO staples (such as the slow, gradual progression stretched across months or even years) and tries its hardest to foster player communities (by, for example, making furniture acquisition far, far faster if you regularly meet other players, as well as allowing players to create real in-game items with custom art that can be shared through codes). MMOs can definitely learn a thing or two from it, despite Nintendo’s utter and complete cluelessness about any and everything that deals with online play.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

Wildstar is not going to return, not by any official means anyway. We saw Wildstar get more chances than any game in the history of gaming had got to try and turn it around and live.

The player base was just too small. Nothing they did turned it around. Sure, there were a small number of people who thought it was the best game ever, but the vast majority of gamers ignored it.

I don’t know why, I thought it was a decent enough game and was pretty fun, but it was a ghost town with no players around. It wasn’t fun for me without players there. I had plenty of single-player games to go play if I was going to play a game aone.

NCSoft, who was known to have screwed over other games in the past gave this game more chances than an enabling parent should and it just never could get the players to make it remotely commercially viable or even to see much of a player population around at all. They really really tried, again, and again, but it didn’t work. I’m sorry to those few that really loved the game but the game is not going to return officially.

A fan rogue server? Sure. There could be enough people to get together and cover server costs for one of those probably.

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Anstalt

How many people can play together within the same virtual environment?

If its above 500, it’s definitely an MMO. If its below 128 then it’s definitely not an MMO. If it’s in the middle, feel free to argue whether it is or not.

As to a new Star Wars MMO: Hell yes! We don’t have one currently, swtor is not an MMO (player cap of 75 is not massively multiplayer….) so it would be great to have a new one. However, whilst EA retain the exclusive rights to the IP I would rather they just wait, I wouldn’t want EA anywhere near another SW game.

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Armsbend

Not at all – you all told me as much when Pokemon S/S came out with a nigh identical online component. Persistent world having multiple people? Nope.

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Arktouros

MMO is pretty simple to define. How many people can play together at once? If the answer is less than a FPS game server (IE: 64-128) then that’s not massively multiplayer.

I don’t know who needs to hear this but it’s okay if online game titles with multiplayer in them to not be considered MMOs.

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Utakata

I see many can’t get past MMO definition of this. (I wonder what they would of thought about Guild Wars 1).

…but it makes me think if the next great step in sandbox MMO’s is to create something where players just putter around in an imaginative world. Where there is less focus on monetization (read: cash shops), but creating small domains where you invite others over too at your choosing. And one without PvP, raids, grinding and gated content. All represented in brain bleach chibi fashion as this game, MapleStory 2 or Hello Kitty Online. o.O

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Arktouros

I struggle with GW1 because really it doesn’t fit the definition of what most people see a MMO as including myself. On the one hand there were huge social areas where lots could and would congregate and on the other most of the game play activity was severely limited player numbers. It’s also pretty much one of the very few examples out there that defies what is otherwise a pretty uniform definition of game attributes.

In retrospect I’d probably label GW1 as probably one of the first live service/MMO lite style games rather than a full on MMO with GW2 stepping up to the full MMO designation.

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Utakata

That’s a reasonable assessment, IMO. :)

Covynant001
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Covynant001

Massively Multiplayer Online.

The definition is simple, clear, yet so many are confused as to what one is. Weird.

Have a big friends list for trading is like saying you have such on Ebay…. Lulz.

There is no standard list of gameplay features which makes a game a MMO, though many MMOs have some similarities.

Techno Wizard
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Techno Wizard

You can visit other players online so yeah, AC:NH is definitely an MMO in my book. And Animal Crossing is mondo cool too, win win.

Covynant001
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Covynant001

You can do the same in FO76, 15 per world instance and it even has a friends list!

Still not a MMO, just a multiplayer game, or perhap sort of like a Cooperative Online RPG, (CORPG), a term first coined by ANET when they launched GW1.

Techno Wizard
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Techno Wizard

“In my book” but not yours.

Roymahboi
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Roymahboi

It has some economy and customization aspects, but for me an mmo is a game where you are constantly interacting with other players and bumping into them, which in this case Animal Crossing New Horizons isn’t.

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Hikari Kenzaki

constantly interacting with other players and bumping into them

Guess that’s why the didn’t call Secret World Legends an MMO.

badum tish

Pepperzine
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Pepperzine

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