Riot Games defends Valorant’s Vanguard security driver, offers a $100k bounty to exploit it

    
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Riot Games defends Valorant’s Vanguard security driver, offers a $100k bounty to exploit it

Last week, Riot Games unveiled that their in-development competitive FPS Valorant runs an anti-cheat process in the background of player systems, which caused no small measure of community discussion, both against and for the decision. As a result, Riot has posted a dev blog that both seeks to defend the decision to have a driver and extends a $100,000 challenge to anyone who exploits it.

The post first elaborates on just what Vanguard does from a nuts-and-bolts perspective, explaining once more that Vanguard can be removed from a system but will effectively halt Valorant from running. It then defends Vanguard, once again repeating that it does not collect personal information and send it anywhere and that it has passed certification.

In fact, Riot seems so sure that Vanguard is an effective and safe anti-cheat process that it’s offering a bounty on HackerOne of up to $100,000 for “high quality reports that demonstrate practical exploits leveraging the Vanguard kernel driver.”

Making Valorant a fair and safe playing environment has been on the forefront of Riot’s mind, as it has not only discussed the Vanguard driver but additional measures like the Fog of War wallhack protection. The developer is adamant in its ability to stop cheating and maintain its “player-focused culture.” In fact, Riot goes so far as to encourage players to hold its feet to that fire:

“We’d never let Riot ship something we couldn’t stand behind from a player-trust perspective. Players have every right to question and challenge us, but let’s be clear — we wouldn’t work here if we didn’t deeply care about player trust and privacy and believe that Riot feels the same way. We’re players just like you, and we wouldn’t install programs on our computer that we didn’t have the utmost confidence in.

“Please keep holding us accountable for protecting both the competitive integrity of your games and your personal privacy.”

source: Riot Games website, cheers Sorenthaz

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Random MMO fan
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Random MMO fan

What an interesting thread. Everything from xenophobic replies to people fearing something which is already being done by many other programs without any negative effects or something which may be abused but most likely never will while providing benefits for every player of the game who wants to play fair. Reminds me of certain president’s supporters or people who believe certain vaccines may cause negative effects just because some random person said they may do this without any proof.

What’s even more sad is seeing a link to a very detailed explanation why this kind of protection is beneficial in the article posted above and still seeing comments which were made by people who never even read it:
https://secret.club/2020/04/17/kernel-anticheats.html

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Anthony Clark

No thank you.

The fact that it has that running at system start-up means I’ll never install this title. FAR too many game choices on the market currently to have to settle for this type of behavior from a paranoid developer.

Hard pass.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Right there with you. I don’t even run Microsoft Office on my gaming rig. Office is on a lap top that I use only for Office. All my financial stuff is on another computer that is used solely for that reason.

People are very much too cavalier about allowing their person information out into the world, where it can be used for any purpose by anyone.

Why is Zuckerberg so filthy rich? Because he sells the information Facebook collects on millions of people to others who then use it to exploit them.

Of course Riot is going to say it’s perfect, nothing to see here. Of course they are going to promise not to look at stuff they shouldn’t. But it’s a rootkit and it has total access to everything.

No game is worth exposing yourself like that.

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Natalyia

It’s not a matter of “tinfoil hat irrational paranoia”, or even a matter of if I do or don’t trust the intentions of Riot or Tencent.

It’s a matter of a driver like the one Valorant uses for this anti-cheat system runs from boot with kernel level privileges, 24/7. Exploiting a flaw in such a driver would give an attacker unfettered access to your system – such exploits are the “holy grail” of malware.

That’s why so very few things are allowed to run at that level. They appear to have done what they can to minimize the vulnerability footprint, but it’s unavoidably there – and the more popular Valorant becomes, the more attractive finding an exploit in that driver will be. And the odds are better than fair that there is one. Code is complex and difficult to make secure.

Adding to the kernel-level exploit surface of my computer 24/7 from boot isn’t something I’m willing to do to play a game. It’s just not a price I’m willing to pay. I don’t let other kernel-level anti-cheats run on my machine, and I’m not going to make an exception now for Valorant.

If you don’t trust Riot, or Tencent (or any game company), then you shouldn’t be running code from them on your machine in the first place. The existing user-mode anti-cheats can do plenty of espionage on your system, and hiding scraped personal info in the game’s network traffic wouldn’t be a challenge if they were minded to do so.

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Random MMO fan

It’s not a matter of “tinfoil hat irrational paranoia”

Actually it is. If people are afraid of remote exploits – they should not be playing ANY multiplayer game on PC which is running Windows. It is irrational to only pay attention to Valorant’s anti-cheat considering that Windows has many more working exploits at any time (it is not hard to find those if you know where to look and not all of them even cost a lot of money) and considering Valorant’s anti-cheat has not been exploited yet.

What rational person should be doing if they want to play multiplayer PC games is to have a dedicated PC which does not have any valuable information on it strictly for gaming. With a proper protection such as using authenticator for all online games which support it. This way it will not matter if someone will exploit it and take over it through any means, be it either Valorant’s anti-cheat or dozens of new vulnerabilities that are being discovered in Windows and in other software like browsers or games themselves, you will not lose anything valuable and you can always fully restore whole system from backup (which is another very rational thing for ANYONE to do).

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Natalyia

No, there’s a fundamental difference between the exploits available to a stock runtime and one running with “ring 0” permissions.

As I pointed out – if you’re worried about the companies whose game you’re running? You shouldn’t be running it at all, or you should be running it as you suggest.

Much of what exploiters look for is a way to “elevate their privilege” on any computer to get the equivalent of “ring 0” access. Operating systems (now) have a myriad of ways to constrain what malicious code can do, but nearly none of them apply to “ring 0” code – that’s the level the foundations of the OS itself uses.

If third-party hackers find a flaw in the Valorant driver, they’re home-free to do anything they like on your system. This is broader permission that you have if you’re running as an Administrator user on Windows. And it’s running from the moment your computer boots.

I don’t think it’s a malicious rootkit, and I understand their rationale – cheats can do this, and thus bypass any lesser-privileged anti-cheat. It’s just not a risk I’m willing to add to my computer to play a game. Not for Valorant, or any other game. It’s not worth it to me.

In addition, it’s adding a risk to the computers its running on for a marginal, and at-best-temporary benefit. Much like copy protection schemes, the number of people who will be trying to break this anti-cheat will be far greater than the number of people Riot can afford to dedicate to keeping it safe.

The people doing this aren’t getting paid, they’re doing it for the challenge – and when they succeed, then the additional risk the driver adds to computers will be for little or no benefit.

Odds are that nothing bad will happen here – certainly not right away. But people leave software installed for a very long time, and are often careless about updating it. That driver will be running on thousands of machines every day long after the people using them have stopped playing. And if Valorant is popular? Sooner or later it’ll be leveraged for an exploit.

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Random MMO fan

If third-party hackers find a flaw in the Valorant driver, they’re home-free to do anything they like on your system. This is broader permission that you have if you’re running as an Administrator user on Windows. And it’s running from the moment your computer boots.

I know that, I am well aware what you can do with exploits of signed drivers, including disabling Windows driver signature enforcement to install any unsigned driver you want, disabling any antimalware, firewall and any protection against file encryption or deleting files which are currently in use but that was not the point. The point is, there are multiple ways to gain access to Windows and do things like install malware which could do various things, you do not need a ring 0 access to it by exploiting a vulnerability in driver (such as Valorant anticheat’s driver), you can use plenty of other methods. A lot of people get irrationally outraged specifically about Valorant’s driver by disregarding other ways and existing vulnerabilities that Windows itself has as well as various hardware drivers and various applications people install which may also be exploited in future or already are, if they actually cared about rational security – they could EASILY make their gaming PC secure enough where none of exploits would matter, be it either Valorant’s driver (which does not have any exploits yet) or driver from Gigabyte or an exploit which does not require such low level access through drivers. There is no need to specifically single out Valorant’s driver (which does not have exploits yet), regardless of how it is loaded and what access level it has.

That driver will be running on thousands of machines every day long after the people using them have stopped playing.

So what? If it will become exploited – Microsoft can push out patch to remove it, the good antimalware application will also be able to remove it (if the antimalware was not affected itself), at the very worst the user can just format PC and reinstall the OS and games if the system is compromised in a way that neither Windows nor antimalware can remove the driver. And this will only happen IF it will become exploited.

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Natalyia

Your rebuttal comes down to “there’s other ways to hack your computer and worst-case you can just reformat from scratch, so why care?”

Locking my car (or my doors/windows) isn’t 100% foolproof in terms of keeping people from breaking in. That passwords can be brute-forced or stolen doesn’t mean I use “1234” for my passwords. If I have an easy, low-cost option that will reduce the odds of misfortune, I’m not going to turn it down.

Not installing a kernel-level driver for Valorant is such a choice for me. I don’t *need* to play that game. There’s plenty of other interesting games I can play that don’t exact that price. I’ll spend my time and money on them.

If the fun you’ll get from Valorant in particular is worth the marginal increase in vulnerability the anti-cheat imposes? Then go ahead and play it. Odds are very large against there being a flaw that’s easy to find, or a bug that’ll crash the machine. It’s probably fine, at least for now. But it’s just not worth it for me.

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Bruno Brito

What rational person should be doing if they want to play multiplayer PC games is to have a dedicated PC which does not have any valuable information on it strictly for gaming.

You mean what people with money should be doing. Or do you think having several PCs for several specific tasks is something anyone can do?

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Random MMO fan

I mean what smart person should be doing, a person who does not want to lose valuable data or let others gain access to it and steal it, using billions of exploits which are already found or will be found in an OS that user runs or hardware drivers this user installed for their video card, motherboard, mouse, keyboard or any third-party software that uses internet connection which user installed. It does not cost much money to have a basic PC with very limited or no internet access and no unnecessary software, with more secure OS than Windows. Certainly much less than paying to restore the data that was encrypted or deleted if you do not have good backup or trying to deal with exposure of the data that was stolen from you.

Of course, if your data is worthless and you do not think it needs such protection – then there is definitely no need for such dedicated PC to keep your data safe. In which case it also does not matter if you run dozen of anticheat software with kernel mode drivers which may get exploited some day (I am exaggerating and I do not count in potential performance impact but hopefully you get the point).

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John Kiser

Another case of people looking for shit to whine about. Just about every serious FPS now has an anti-cheat process of some sort be it Easy Anti-Cheat, Steam’s VAC system (built into steam itself but easy anti-cheat is another that has a process), Punkbuster in the past, EA’s built in system etc. This whole thing honestly stems more at this point from an anti-china outlook as opposed to any valid concerns about riot as a company and protecting data or what this stuff does.

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silverlock

I don’t think you even know what a root kit is do you? Maybe educate yourself first.

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John Kiser

I do happen to know what a rootkit is. Do you because you sound uneducated as hell on the subject of you think that riot is just installing rootkits. Typical fear mongering because china and tencent are involved thanks for proving the overall point. Jesus Christ you are ignorant or bigoted as all hell if you take this stance.

Acting like companies are installing rootkits just because they happen to have tencent or a Chinese company involved is just literally fear mongering. They are s multinational and have people from other countries involved. A rootkit would end up detrimental to their investment and riot simply wouldn’t do it as their games would end up banned or issues would crop up for them making money.

Educate yourself instead of making up stupid ignorant shit in your head based on paranoid conspiracy theories

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Yet, Riot has put an always-on process on your computer that is not uninstalled if you remove the game.

The “this would hurt their business” is simply not a defense. They expect people to be 1) uninformed; or 2) dismissive.

They absolutely will 100% get away with putting a constantly running rootkit on gamers computers. How do I know this? Because they already have.

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John Kiser

Let’s put this up there. They want an even playing field and to make it harder to abuse their game. It is a driver that you can remove after you uninstall the game if you are that worried about it. If you are so concerned uninstall the driver / stop any service it runs when you close the game or uninstall it or what have you but stop with this bullshit that it’s rootkits or other shit to try and fear monger.

You are probably one of these people that bitch and complain about this but leave steam running 24/7 when your computer is on which is collecting much of the same info all the time.

You keep saying “root-kits” because you are attempting to fear monger.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

I get that you’re a tech guy and think it’s silly for people to worry about a program you know how to control, get rid of or nullify. Of your many posts, you make it clear you doubt people know what they are talking about and are fearful because of ignorance.

How then do you expect this poorly informed and tech unsavvy group of gamers/parents/children to defend themselves against an unwanted intrusion? Nearly everyone will assume that uninstalling the game, uninstalls this program. It doesn’t. You know that, I know that, but very, very many who download this game will not.

I’m sorry, but a game, especially one full of cheating, is not an excuse for this kind of nonsense to be loaded onto your computer. Which is my point. There is no game worth putting your rig at risk.

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John Kiser

This isn’t really a valid argument. Gamers load up programs that do the same kind of shit. Your rig isn’t at risk suddenly from loading something like a driver up. If you don’t trust riot uninstall league and everything to do with them and if you don’t trust any company with chinese investment at all simply remove every single game from your computer and console as they almost all have chinese investments into them in some form.

I doubt people know what they are talking about out of ignorance and bigotry because they are largely basing any argument here off the fact that Tencent is chinese and therefor anything riot does with any sort of data prodding is suspect and ehh it’s frankly a tired argument. By the logic followed then perhaps the largest shareholder and the actual “owner” of tencent (Naspers a south african company based in cape town) would also have increased pressure on tencent.

Another thing to bring up here is that it is highly unlikely for this to play out the way people want to act like it does. These china companies be they investment, vc, holding companies or what have you aren’t going to start doing a bunch of shady shit with their western based investment because a ton of them are big money for these companies simply because a lot of people spend money in the west on gaming and it’s a multi-billion dollar industry for these folks and is slated to grow. Tencent and chinese companies are heavily invested in western entertainment in general.

Also outside of people that buy into fear mongering and those spreading it you probably will find very few gamers that really care. They care about playing the game they want to play and that is it. Quite a few anti-cheat softwares in use don’t uninstall with the games as they are separate installs entirely and it varies wildly. Punkbuster I know for sure does not uninstall itself with a game uninstall and needs to be uninstalled seperately.

Most gamers simply will not care that it doesn’t uninstall when the game does unless it actively starts to eat up system resources or cause some sort of problems. The whole term “unwanted intrusion” is sort of silly in and of itself. This is an install that if people read would be aware of and they are very likely to see the install happen. Those curious enough would poke what it is and see if it is safe or not.

I find it silly to worry about things from unfounded conclusions because quite simply it is jumping to huge assumptions. China is bad to it’s own citizens on a regular basis and should be admonished for that. This is a case of riot trying to actually keep the game more secure and the like in a way that is much harder for someone to tinker with and it’s SHITTY as hell that it has to come down to them having to even do it in the first place, but too much bullshit happens now with people attempting to exploit that this was the logical conclusion ultimately.

Cheating is rampant and largely ruining competitive multiplayer games particularly shooters. I seldom even jump into shit vs other people these days because it is bad enough when I do. Dedicated servers solve some of that shit when you have active administration, but ultimately we are here now with this being the solution because of our own actions and it is our fault that they are going to these lengths and not the responsibility of anyone else.

If we didn’t want this to happen we should of stopped the stupid exploiting everything we could type of culture and all the cheating that happens. We didn’t and people are constantly looking for exploits in games now to get an edge so they can say they can somehow feel superior.

The idea though again that this is an unwanted intrusion is unfounded.

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Arktouros

It’s really not ignorance nor bigotry to be wary of any Chinese company being involved even if it’s through ownership of another company. In fact I would argue it’s ignorance that leads you to the conclusion that it would be bigotry in the first place.

There are innumerable examples of the Chinese government exerting influence over not only it’s own companies but also companies that have dealings with them. For example as we learned with the Huawei situation due to Chinese national security laws it would have to hand over any data gathered. There are obvious and factual reasons for people to be concerned and or wary in this scenario.

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John Kiser

First off, any company in any part of the world that collects data needs to turn 0ver data to relevant authorities when asked to do so this includes the US, EU, UK, Japan, and anywhere with a functioning government. This is literally part of the process of government and isn’t intrinsically a chinese thing yet you don’t bitch about other countries having to do the same with your data.

Secondly you assume it is pertinent data that is taken many times. A lot of the time this data is shared all over the place regardless. They are likely keeping track of some phone information like version numbers, apps you have installed and the like.

There has been no factual info on data collected by chinese companies that should somehow put the fear into anyone more than any other company in any other country on the planet so yes it is a form of bigotry when you are only going on about china and not these other countries.

It’s ignorant to simply assume that china and chinese companies is collecting some magical extra data vs other companies/countries. It is ignorant because you do not know the data the is collected and assumptions based on it simply being “because china” are in fact very ignorant and culturally biased because you are simply basing it off “because china”.

You also assume they are collecting personal data and lying because again china so yes you are ignorant and being a bigot that is basing things on a country instead of actual hard data here.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Two words for you: Cambridge Analytica.

It should be obvious that lawlessness and unaccountability are rife throughout the world. Authoritarian governments don’t give a squat about their own laws if they choose to ignore them. Current events being a case in point.

Relying on governments to keep you safe from the predatory behavior of multi-nationals when those governments are profiting or being rewarded by that behavior is short-sighted at best.

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John Kiser

A few words about that for you. A – that was unauthorized data collection using a third parties shit that users opted into and then had data collected on others and that was not nearly the same situation here. This is prevention of shit by having something more tamper proof on a system that analyzes running processes and the like for fishy things like cheats etc.

You are saying that Riot are liars and you don’t believe them simply because why exactly? Because a chinese company is involved even though there has been nothing showing them putting stress on any company they are actively invested in. Hard data isn’t being used to back up claims.

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Random MMO fan

This is absolutely no different than the government of any other country, such as US, they can all request to hand over any data from local companies, only thing that is different is that it requires extra steps in some countries. Each and every of them are slaves to demands of local government – take a look at Google who were disallowed to provide services to Huawei by US government even though it does not benefit Google, they also share user information with various US government agencies which they themselves admit.

Only reason people are specifically mention China in some comments below is because right now it is trendy to make an evil out of them, especially in US, and many people just blindly trust anything being told by TV or their favorite mass media.

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Aaron Weddle

its an always running kernel level root-kit that continues to run on and spy on you even after u’ve removed the game it has nothing to do with china it has to do that with a kernal level root-kit that is there even if you uninstall the games gives them the ability to spy on you anytime they want

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John Kiser

No, it isn’t. It is silly. You can uninstall it when you uninstall the game it is a separate uninstall and you could easily watch what a driver process is doing if you know what the heck you are doing. It is removable. It even says above you can remove it. Frankly it is silly as hell to be so against it just because it is a driver. It is literally fear mongering to a point of silliness.

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Utakata

Anti-China…

…I think I can safely count on one finger which person here is looking for shit to whine about. Just saying.

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John Kiser

It is quite clearly anti-china sentiment at this point. I can guarantee you if this was a purely US based company doing this we’d see a lot less people whining about it or it likely would of never been brought up at all. You really think it isn’t people just weary of china or chinese companies and an actual worry? If it weren’t for the connection to tencent i can guarantee you we’d see very little to nothing about this.

Considering the amount of fear mongering and “not believing” stuff that is going on it is indeed whining and basing things off the connection to tencent which in turn is not trusted because “china”.

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Utakata

…I am pretty sure it’s the last thing people are concerned about when forced to deal with this. As in, the more immediate concern would be Riot themselves, and what they plan to do with that information they’re gleaming off their customer base with this. Trolling out a the China card is is likely the last thing anyone wants to hear at this point on the matter. And reasonably so.

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John Kiser

“Forced to deal with this”. Jesus do you listen to yourself talk at all? I trotted out the china card because it is purely what it is at this point. Or do you simply think that Riot is just massively untrustworthy themselves and refuse to actually believe no personal info is collected? Why then do you not bitch and whine and likely leave steam open or other programs on your computer that collect the same data?

You are making a huge jump to them gleaming personal date despite them saying they do not and a certification pass. You are making huge assumptions and the only logical thought process to jump to with a lot of the stuff when dealing with this amount of fear mongering and non belief when dealing with a company owned by tencent is largely going to be that you have a problem because tencent is chinese and think that by extension that Riot is going to be up to some shady shit.

If you are mildly curious about what they may gleam it would likely be something akin to software you have installed and currently running processes in memory as well as what hardware you may be running cpu/gpu/and memory size wise. Not super complicated and not any identifying data nor would it be data that is going to be a big selling point. They have more data on you if you’ve ever spent money on one of their games than a tool like this likely even collects.

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Utakata

I listen to myself all the time. And I suspect the sound of my voice is much better than yours…

…look, I don’t know you. And I am just only dealing with the off-the-wall claims and apologetics you seem to be spewing out here. To which I am now having regrets engaging.

So I get it, the parrot is just resting. We’re unlikely to ever agree over this. Nor have you provided anything new and compelling to change my mind on this. So let’s just drop it. Full stop.

…thanks for your time though!

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Alexus Yanova

Just give up, dude. You are trying to argue with people who prefer to believe in artificial FUD created by mass media and armchair “I work in Eye Tee, anticheat with low level access and driver which loads on startup is bad because I said so” Reddit posters instead of being rational thinkers who operate based on facts (facts like there are no remote exploits available for Valorant’s anti-cheat, there is no measurable performance impact on any application or game with the driver always running in background and there is no proof that Riot uses it to steal any valuable data from user’s PCs or profits in any way from reselling data collected through their anticheat, and if they wanted to collect and resell user data – they could’ve already done this through game client). With people like these, nothing will help except giving up.

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Utakata

We also have cooties too! o.O

Random MMO fan
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Random MMO fan

Yea, pretty much this. I wonder why it is not yet trendy to write articles on Reddit and on websites about how “bad” it is to have something like Kaspersky Antivirus installed on your PC considering it also has a very low level access to OS and that it also belongs to a foreign developer.
Or why does nobody write an article about Xigncode3 anti-cheat in Black Desert Online, which is a kernel mode anti-cheat developed by South Korean company Wellbia. I guess those countries are not allowed to be hated on yet.

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‪‪‪

It’s just fearmongering.

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Alexus Yanova

All around this kind of stuff really makes me glad I’ve started to shift towards isolating my devices and what I do on them. I don’t do social media or shopping and such on my gaming PC so on and so forth.

This is always a smart decision, nobody should store any sensitive information on any internet-enabled device, there are always many exploits for many popular software which can allow remote access, including Windows itself.

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TJ French

The whole thing is moot if you just stop playing their crap games.

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Ironwu

The problem is not that people will be able to exploit this system.

The problem is that this system will be able to exploit the people.

This whole 100k thing is just a smokescreen to take folk’s eyes off the real issue, in my opinion.

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Alexus Yanova

Good for them to offer a reward, unfortunately this will not stop the irrational paranoid people.

Since most of people here do not play FPS games, they are not aware that there used to be a popular anticheat called PunkBuster, it was very popular since there was no competition but it was not very good at detecting many cheats, though it was better than nothing at all. People who played games which used PunkBuster know that it always run in background, just like Valorant anticheat software, as soon as you turned your PC on. And it has never caused any issues for vast majority of people, and throughout many years there has only been a couple of remote exploits for it which allowed people to do things like falsely banning players of certain game, all of which were quickly patched. No one has been able to access any sensitive user data through such exploits.

TL;DR: there is no reason for rational people to be concerned about always running anticheat software. No software is bug-free but there are many ways to properly design software to prevent someone from doing stuff like accessing your sensitive information.

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Bruno Brito

Since most of people here do not play FPS games, they are not aware that there used to be a popular anticheat called PunkBuster

I am completely aware of PunkBuster and you talk like anyone liked this shit. They didn’t. Specially for me, it was always running and taking memory power from my PC.

No software is bug-free but there are many ways to properly design software to prevent someone from doing stuff like accessing your sensitive information.

“Hey guys, i know i have this loaded gun pointed to your head, but trust me, i won’t shoot”.

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Alexus Yanova

I do not care what you liked or not. I posted it to show example of anti-cheat service which existed for many years without major exploits (other than one exploit with DoS and another one that caused a false ban of some BF players which was reversed) and without exposing user information to everyone even though it used to always run in the background as soon as PC was turned on, because this is something that a lot of paranoid people are afraid of and because Riot published a bounty for finding exploits in their current anticheat.

If you still have a fear of running such software because of potential to remotely exploit it – you are always free to not play games which use it. Same goes if you believe that a few precious megabytes of RAM are too important to trade in for a potential extra security.

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flatline4400

Your argument boils down to, “Hey guys, remember when they used to punch you in the face just to play a game? Well now they only point a gun at you! It’s much better!”

Also, don’t make assumptions about what kind of games people here play. You are bound to be 100% wrong.

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starbuck1771

Are you on dope? Punkbuster was always being exploited. That’s why they had to update it several times weekly. Hackers and coders were constantly beating it and releasing their script’s to cheater’s. BTW punkbuster is still around just not many developers use it because it’s been proven ineffective and costly. http://evenbalance.com/

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Bruno Brito

I do not care what you liked or not.

That’s your problem. Not mine.

I posted it to show example of anti-cheat service which existed for many years without major exploits (other than one exploit with DoS and another one that caused a false ban of some BF players which was reversed) and without exposing user information to everyone even though it used to always run in the background as soon as PC was turned on, because this is something that a lot of paranoid people are afraid of and because Riot published a bounty for finding exploits in their current anticheat.

You posted a comment about a shitty anticheat to prove that we will endure other shitty anticheats? You’re really not good at this, are you?

If you still have a fear of running such software because of potential to remotely exploit it – you are always free to not play games which use it. Same goes if you believe that a few precious megabytes of RAM are too important to trade in for a potential extra security.

“PoTeNtIaL eXtRa SeCuRiTy”

Against who? Because Avast and AVG was caught this very fucking year selling data. Cool, i’m protected against cheaters. Who the fuck protects me against Riot? Can’t i play a fucking game without worrying that Tencent is selling my data to the highest bidder? Who protects me against Tencent?

Is the whiteknightning zealots like you that piss me off. Because you allow this shit to happen by diminishing gamers complaints. Bite me.

Reader
starbuck1771

Correct which is why people hate these so called anti-cheat programs. They’re highly exploitable and also cause issues with your PC and are usually very buggy (can be triggered by antivirus and firewalls).

Reader
Arktouros

I don’t think it’s entirely irrational in an age where companies make billions selling personal data to be be concerned over personal and digital privacy nor does that make you exactly paranoid.