Ubisoft takes Google and Apple to court over an alleged Rainbow Six Siege mobile clone

    
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Ubisoft takes Google and Apple to court over an alleged Rainbow Six Siege mobile clone

Ubisoft is legally miffed at Google and Apple. After pleas to both companies to remove a mobile game that looks an awful lot like Rainbow Six Siege went unheeded, the French publisher/developer is taking both Apple and Google to court.

The kerfuffle is focused on Area F2, a mobile game created by Ejoy.com, which is owned by Alibaba, China’s largest e-commerce and tech firm. According to a complaint filed in Los Angeles federal court this past Friday, Ubisoft believes that Area F2 is practically a carbon copy of their tactical FPS. “Virtually every aspect of [Area F2] is copied from [Rainbow Six Siege], from the operator selection screen to the final scoring screen, and everything in between,” reads part of the complaint. “Ubisoft’s competitors are constantly looking for ways to piggyback on R6S’s popularity and to capture the attention, and money, of R6S players.”

Both Apple and Google have declined to comment, while the devs of Area F2 have reportedly claimed that their game was in development for two years and does not infringe upon Ubisoft’s copyright. Ubisoft has also responded to reuqests for comment, saying, “While we are not able to comment on pending litigation, we can confirm that Ubisoft is committed to protecting its intellectual property.”

A video has put together some side-by-side comparisons of various events and elements of both games in action. You can judge for yourself by watching the embedded video below.

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Robert Mann

Side by… uh, is the other side off screen? XD

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Adam Russell

False advertising. AFAICT there is no “side by side comparison” in that video.

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McGuffn

That may be the worst side by side video I’ve ever seen.

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3dom

Which phones do not contain any China-manufactured details?

The first thing I’m going to do after quarantine – stop buying anything containing Chinese parts. Got enough of their unhealthy exports for the rest of my life already.

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Match Austin

Then I hope you’ve upgraded your PC well enough to sustain you for a good, long time, because you likely won’t be upgrading again. Almost any computer part you can buy has parts manufactured in china.

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3dom

It’s like you, guys, have never heard of that small Taiwanese video card company (nVIDIA) – or minuscule Korean SSD, RAM, motherboard chips developer (Samsung). Or the barely known CPU manufacturing plant in Ireland (Intel). If anything, getting non-Chinese PC isn’t a problem at all.

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Schmidt.Capela

Depends on how far you want to go; the main chips, and the boards from some manufacturers, might be assembled outside China, but just about all of them use components sourced from China. I don’t think it’s currently possible to build any current gen high performance electronics device in volumes large enough to supply the international market without components sourced from China, as the rest of the world combined simply can’t provide the volume of components required at a high enough quality.

This is the result of decades of outsourcing manufacturing capabilities to China, chasing lower costs. It would likely take about a decade to reverse that, assuming there’s the political will to force business to invest billions, and likely end with higher recurring costs, in the name of getting China out of the supply chains. Doing that would likely cost western companies that force that decoupling their access to Asian and African markets, mind, since those places are already far more dependent on China than on any other country or economic block.

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Jack Pipsam

I think there’s some (or was) some of the more super-duper-niche European brands which didn’t use China for components.