The Daily Grind: Would your favorite MMORPG benefit from more servers?

    
10

Back around when Elder Scrolls Online launched Greymoor, I saw an interesting thread on the official forums asking for new servers. For some MMOs, that’s quite common, of course, as people like the idea of fresh start servers, and especially at the beginning of a game, the big influx of players can overwhelm a small server set. Over time, player numbers tend to go down, though, and those servers become unnecessary.

Elder Scrolls Online, however, uses megaserver technology, meaning everyone in the same region plays together. While that’s a huge boon for grouping and communication, it’s also generated complaints about overcrowding and lag, as the game continues to grow. And it does continue to grow: The pandemic in combination with the new content have been good for the game.

Would your favorite MMORPG benefit from more servers? What should ESO do about this problem?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

10
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Covynant001
Reader
Covynant001

EVE Online… Fresh start universe…the chaos would be legendary.

Reader
Kanbe

I’m currently playing DDO and I actually think the opposite. There i think server merges wouldn’t be a bad idea to consolidate the population a bit better for easier grouping.

Sixuality
Reader
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Sixuality

In an ideal world every MMO would be on a megaserver. Aside from anything else it avoids the nearly inevitable moment in the lifecycle of every MMO when servers have to be merged, with all the cries of ‘dead game’ and drama from losing character names that follows. Remember how many servers SWTOR used to have? It didn’t look good when they had to shut most of them down.

Neverwinter and Star Trek Online have, I think, the best set up to handle fluctuating populations, creating new instances as required. That said, the zones of those games are small and self contained and what works for them wouldn’t necessarily work for more expansive and open game worlds.

The other downside of megaservers is that they may not scale down well – or at all. One of the issues Little Orbit had with Fallen Earth was that the game’s server set up was designed to manage thousands of concurrent players, not the hundred or so they had logged in by the end.

Still, I think ESO should tough it out unless it becomes actually unplayable. If they did open up new servers now they’d have to know that, in the end, they’ll probably have to shut them down again when the population returns to normal.

Marvin Marshall
Reader
Marvin Marshall

ESO’s problem is that after every content update, for the better part of week, the starter zones are unplayable. After Greymoor, I had a ping of 300-500. Almost everyone did. I sit around 35-50 most of the time. It took four days of emergency maintenance to finally fix the problem. They can blame it on the influx of players all they want, but it was obvious it was a problem in the code that caused the issue.

Once the issue was fixed, the crowded starter zones ran as smooth as it had before.

Sixuality
Reader
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Sixuality

One of the benefits of my being so far behind in just about every MMO I play is that I rarely experience first-hand the update day madness, but yeah, that does sound pretty bad.

Still, for all that it’s not directly developed by them it is a Bethesda IP, so I guess not working at launch and having to be fixed later is very on-brand for them.

Reader
Castagere Shaikura

This is so true and right now on the NA server player are going through 2 to 3-second delays of their skills firing off and it is even happening to the npc’s too.

Reader
Loopy

While i do agree that megaservers are a best solution for “health” of a game, they introduce instances and layers which fragment the community.

In some games this is a non-issue because of the way their group content is designed, and realistically majority of players don’t really care whether they see the same person on their instance or not.

On the other hand, for some people server identity and community is very important and a matter of pride. They love questing in a zone and being able to see that same random person follow along or progress at the same pace. A player’s reputation is a permanent thing in such games, which adds to the sense of roleplaying and immersion.

So i don’t know if one method is “better” than the other. I guess it depends on what you’re trying to achieve. Stability of your population and its critical mass, or the community aspect of your player base.

Mordyjuice
Reader
Mordyjuice

I think people in ESO were just whining, it was a launch day FFS.

Marvin Marshall
Reader
Marvin Marshall

It was a serious issue. 300-500 ping for anyone in the early maps. Unplayable. Other maps were affected to lesser extent as well. Which had little to do with the crowded maps. Lasted about four days till they fixed the issue after four tries.

Reader
Zora

Well, SWTOR could sure benefit from a pure RP server, which we actually HAD but they collapsed all the existing realms onto a handful to presumably combat long(ish) queues… which didn’t vanish at all because the game is kinda comatose and all there’s left is us roleplayers but whaaaatever

Every day we stray further and further from the sith code, let me tell you…