The Daily Grind: Do you share any craft skills with your favorite MMO toon?

    
24

I’ve heard of folks out there who intentionally pick crafts in MMOs because they’re already experts at them – like the real-world politician who gets into EVE Online politics, or the lady who makes smithed gear for LARPers running a blacksmithy in a video game too.

But I am not one of these people.

It might be because most of my own real-life crafts talents don’t come up much in MMOs. Restoring furniture and painting and writing isn’t a skill in most MMOs! In fact, I was marveling the other day how some of my favorite MMOs crafts, like gardening and cooking, are things that I am… not even a little bit good at in real life. My cooking is merely average and I don’t like to do it, and I literally have fake plants in the pots on my porch because my thumb is not green. But I seek out games that have these things. I love the pretend version.

Do you share any craft skills with your favorite MMO toon?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

24
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
starbuck1771

At some point in my youth I did all of it. I did it all so I could figure out what I wanted to do in life. I have also been trained for combat, and as a Kansan I love to hunt as well as ride horses. I also worked at a zoo for a decade and have had farm experience. So yes I have a life full of real world MMO experience even though I will only be 49 in 21 days.

Reader
Jon Wax

Want to work at zoo but probably hard emotionally

Reader
EmberStar

Most likely in more ways that one. The animals can get stressed or sick, and it might be hard to treat some conditions. But more than that, you have “eco warriors” who hate you *because* you’re a zookeeper. They’d rather see the animal “back in the wild,” nevermind that for some that means almost certain death at the hands of poachers.

Reader
Jon Wax

Too hard when they pass

Reader
starbuck1771

Yes it is hard to watch animals you’ve grown attached to die. However that’s just part of nature. However it get’s worse when it comes to large animals due to size and weight because they have to be handled specially which can be very gory.

Reader
Jon Wax

I’m soft. Roadkill depresses me. And I can only imagine how it would go after bonding with an elephant or lion.

Reader
starbuck1771

I never had that issue. Yes animals get sick just like humans and we made sure to have the best veterinarians s possible on staff. As for Eco-Warriors I have never had an issue there as well.

If people asked why animals were not released back into the wild I would give an honest answer. For instance we had three African black leopards that were seized during a federal raid two were elderly and had teeth and claws removed by the people that were abusive to them, then Emma the third was born in captivity and was as playful as a house cat. The two elder cats eventually died due to old age but as I explained to people that the people who the government took them from made it impossible to defend themselves from other predators. As for Emma she wouldn’t have the instincts due to being born in captivity.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

As my home cooking skills have evolved, I’ve paid more attention to cooking skills in my games. Late 00s I barely made anything (though cooking wasn’t entirely alien), so it was a boring game skill. Early 10s I made simple dishes, or shorter term things like frozen stuff ready to fry (steaks, burgers) and salads with the occasionally more complex thing, so I started to see if I knew anything that game cooking would remind me. In the late 10s we really started cooking more complex and hours-long recipes – though not that often as I had school and my partner had the workplace and family to go to – and cooking game skills were no longer boring. This year its turned up at least a notch and we arrange at least 2-3 interesting recipes a week, and have time for a few hours of cooking if need-be, and so I look at game cooking recipes and go ‘is that a thing I could do a version of?’.

I’m still not a creative nor highly skilled cook, but I can follow recipes well enough that if given the time, I’ll enjoy making whatever.

Reader
Jon Wax

Keep your bacon grease!!

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

I try but always forget!

Reader
Jon Wax

Stuff is Mana. Higher smoke point, better flavor and browning then butter.

Reader
Utakata

I seem to be using crafting these days as a cue to designate what toon gets what crafting material. So my Leatherworker gets all the skins, my Jewelcrafter gets all the gems, etc. So this has become merely an excuse for better inventory management…

…so to answer today’s DG, I do…sort of.

Outside of that: Crafting, what is that? o.O

Reader
Utakata

“I think the author means in RL, Uta.”

Oh…crafting, what is that? O.o

‪‪‪
Reader
‪‪‪

I’m a professional at making mistakes, miscalculations and failing in general.

Reader
Jon Wax

Cooking, crafting, building, music making, shooting, trading and smoking whatever gandolf was puffing on

Reader
starbuck1771

Weed was in his bowl. :P

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

The grad school I attended was funded by an industry association and had as one of its missions to give the children skills that would be useful to the industry; as such, I not only had formal (if basic) training in professions like carpenter, plumber, electrician, silk-screen printer, etc, I was also graded on those skills.

The college I attended included among its subjects practical lessons on things like metalworking (forging, welding, operating industrial machinery, etc), reading and drawing blueprints, everything to do with the transmission of electrical signals through both cables and antennas, electrical engines, close-to-metal programming, etc.

I was also a boy scout for about a decade, and was taught how to craft structures using natural materials, leatherworking, whittling, sewing, and other things that might be useful either for survival or when civilization is far away.

And then there are the skills I picked up by myself.

So, yeah, I tend to share some craft skills with almost every character I make. Not to the same degree, of course, but when it comes to crafts I usually had some practical experience, at least at a basic level, with most skills my characters might use.

(Incidentally, given my background, I tend to find restrictions on how many craft skills a character can have as highly unrealistic.)

Reader
starbuck1771

So like me your a fellow Jack of all Trades. A true tradesman.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

More like a reserve corps air force engineer, with some extra training along the way ;-)

(Which is why the air force funded college I went to focused so much on hands-on crafting skills; we are supposed to have the know how to keep things working in the middle of a war. Alas, I was never on active duty — besides active officers, the college is intended to train a large quantity of reserve officers my country’s armed forces can call upon in times of need.)

Reader
starbuck1771

I have always loved G.I. Bill. One of the greatest things ever done for our military.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

Different country and different circumstances, actually; I was a civilian (and underage at that) before passing the entrance exam, no one in my family had ever served more than the mandatory one year military service, and I was only required to sign into the reserve corps (i.e., I would go to officer school but would only have to actually serve in the military if my country got involved in a war) to get the full scholarship.

Which did have the interesting side-effect that I was already going to officer school before I was old enough to actually enlist :-p

Reader
starbuck1771

Not mandatory here. However I passed the U.S. Military exam at both 16 & 18. I also was in ROTC.

Reader
Robert Mann

Unintentionally, perhaps. I do cook well, and craft a little RL, but there’s no intentional “This then is my MMO craft.” On the other hand, I have trained to use medieval weaponry. Sadly, this usually means I find MMOs and most games on the rather boring end there, as there’s so much else I want to do in combat. Having the skill to do things that cannot be done in game, in each case, does make the limitations of the game and technology something which leads toward feeling that something is wrong. Some might call it a break in immersion, but it’s not really the same for me.

Thing is, I want to do different things in games. Since I know combat outside MMOs, I tend toward setups that don’t have that same feel… but I think half of that is the lack of a design that fits with me. I’m on the bulkier side, but not on the slow side, physically (and I certainly am not brainless either). Anytime we get characters in games, they tend to make that bigger, bulkier person slow physically (and sometimes mentally). Which leaves me to look at things that feel less wrong by separating myself from the character entirely.

As such, that separation means that looking at tying the crafts together is the opposite of where I’m going. So I don’t tend to even consider such things, or rather I consider doing so a negative to my enjoyment.

Reader
Rolan Storm

Cooking.