Conan Exiles offers apologies for the state of the Xbox One version and assurances of more focus to fix it

    
1
Conan Exiles offers apologies for the state of the Xbox One version and assurances of more focus to fix it

So the Xbox One version of Conan Exiles has been pretty busted, with out-of-memory system crashes and error messages stating files had been corrupted that started cropping up with Update 41 in August. Worse yet, these issues haven’t really been fixed in spite of an attempt to correct them. This has brought out project director Scott Junior to issue a letter of both contrition and explanation, along with details on what’s being done to fix things.

So just what the heck happened? Apparently, Update 41 was working perfectly fine for developers internally, and no such errors appeared during the certification process. Since then, the devs started poring over the code between Update 40 and 41, which brought about a minor patch that didn’t have an appreciable effect. The devs then sought to apply memory optimizations that were crafted for Isle of Siptah in an October 15th patch, but after checking on a retail version of the build, the errors still persisted and the patch release was cancelled.

As for what’s being done to address the matter, Junior states that there will be more internal resources diverted to fixing the Xbox One version, with outsourced developers and communication with Microsoft to help. There will also be weekly status reports for the Xbox One community, the first of which will arrive next week.

No posts to display

1
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Ironwu

Sounds like Microsoft has given up doing its own QA on games for their consoles. Kind of sad that they are now performing like PC launches. Not a good sign for consoles if this sort of thing becomes common.

I remember the days when one of the major selling points of consoles, and their very expensive games, was that they ran pretty much perfectly because of the intensive QA done by the console companies.

No longer at Microsoft, it would seem.