Massively OP Podcast Episode 312: Written in the stars

    
18

In this week’s show, Bree and Justin talk about Elder Scrolls Online’s Update 29, an incredible WoW Classic community initiative, and Daybreak’s Aliens shooter reveal. There’s also a lot of listener mail in this episode, covering topics such as time capsules, anti-streaming MMOs, and MacOS.

It’s the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you’d like to send in your question to the show, use this link or call in to our voicemail at (734) 221-3973.

Listen to the show right now:

Show notes:

Other info:

Advertisement

No posts to display

newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Sykes

Thanks for the overview of the past eleven years!

As much as I loved 2010 (and actually enjoyed Cataclysm when it came), I think MMOs are better now than ever. Dead games are being revived, to the point where I’m no longer worried about losing a favorite title (AOEO is back!). Classic servers are making it so we can always log in and have a geared character ready to play, but can still make progression in the themepark MMOs or try weird rulesets in EQ or WoW. GW2 brought dynamic events, DDO brought FTP and some remarkable character customization, and Asian MMOs like Justice or BDO are pushing graphical fidelity and art style instead of one or the other. Streaming culture has connected players that don’t have the time to jump in at the moment, and helped smaller MMOs with marketing (World of Warships). Those who can only play once a week can still have fun and play with no-life marathoners in most titles. Event servers with temporary power leading to cosmetics – DDO’s hardcore league and reaper mode, Crowfall’s campaigns, Wow’s Torghast runs – are experimenting with new ways to play and reward while avoiding power creep. Even internet speeds in general mean I can group with Chinese, US, Austrian and Australian players without disconnecting immediately.

We’re in a good place, I think. And hopefully, with this pandemic showing just how stable the industry can be, we’ll get some major AAA games in the genre over the next ten years alongside the mass of more exciting smaller titles (Gorgon, Crowfall, Pantheon) already on the way.

creationguru
Reader
creationguru

I have to agree with Justin on a point he made in the last mail bag question in that having to spend time learning new systems and control schemes for gsmes can be a deterrent in branching out. I say thing in thst I split time between MMOs and single player games and have found starting new single player games is hard as I had feeling bad at games as have been playing them 30+ years and feel it should just come naturally and it does on anything that is at leat 10 years old but modern require more buttons.

Also this is why I am a fan of rogue servers and ranxomizers of older gsmes thst I know and love as I know the feel and control and it take me little time to get I to a grove where in a new modern game I feel out of sync either until 80% through or like 20 hours in to even feel like I know what I am doing.

OK now get of my digital lawn you young wipper snappers.

Reader
Sarnaut Explorer

For the Time Capsule audio question, I believe Allods dropped in 2010, got a Pay to Play server, and lost almost all it’s player base on both the NA and EU clients. The majority of the playerbase is on the Russian servers with even a dedicated guild working on a translation addon.

Btw Bri, I watched that entire Galaxies video for crafting and found your process very interesting. The reason being that it reminded me of my wife’s preferred way to play games. Have a set game plan with all the info she needs to get whatever chore she needs done to feel satisfied with her progress.

swampylogs
Reader
swampylogs

I think Bree hit the nail on the head re: streaming MMOs. For the most successful MMO streamers, the game itself is secondary to the person playing it.

Look at Asmongold as an example: one of if not the biggest dedicated MMO streamers in the world today. He mostly just streams collection/completionist content, which is pretty niche, but the draw of the stream is the character he puts on for the show. The entertainment value comes from the “Asmongold” personality, and WoW serves as the world in which you can interact with the personality and affect the stream.

I think that feature is the hidden potential of MMOs in streaming: when playing in the same virtual world as the streamer, you’re “closer” to the streamer themselves than you are in any other game.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

Definitely, and it’s also the big danger. With parasocial bonds/relationships, you’re not really closer to anyone; you just wind up feeling like you’re close – and for some streamers, you just feel close to a fake character and not even a real person. It’s super exploitable in the wrong hands for sure.

Turing fail
Reader
Turing fail

It’s all about monetization… I have difficulty watching even streamers I find entertaining and insightful because they have to constantly acknowledge the audience to keep the tips coming.

swampylogs
Reader
swampylogs

That’s a bit cynical. Of course a performer is going to engage with their audience. You wouldn’t fault a comic or an instructor for doing it would you? In fact, good audience engagement is something most viewers actually look for in a streamer. It doesn’t necessarily mean they’re working the crowd for tips; out of all the twitch channels I consider my favorites I don’t think I have ever heard one of them ask for or demand tips or subs. That’s not to say there aren’t streamers who do that kind of thing, because there are, particularly streamers for whom most of their views are earned by a low-cut top. But there are plenty of quality streamers with close communities who are genuinely trying to provide an entertaining experience for their audience.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

I might agree with both of you?

Thing is, its just super super annoying to hear a few times or more in a minute “thanks for the subscribe/etc ___!”. And you can’t even pay someone to get past this.

Turing fail
Reader
Turing fail

What you described is precisely what I meant.

creationguru
Reader
creationguru

I find that when watching MMO streams the real gold for me to stick around is I love watching a streamer that is playing an MMO thst I play for the first time and really enjoy their journey in the virtual world.

Turing fail
Reader
Turing fail

Wonder if “olds” only playing games they’re comfortable/familiar with to the exclusion of current games is analogous to how people fixate on music that they liked when they were young?

Is this just part of being human, “imprinting” on whatever brings us joy during our formative years?

For me, I tend to play games I already know more than new ones… though I’m not sure whether it’s an effect of aging or just pandemic-induced comfort-seeking.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
TomTurtle

I imagine part of it is refining one’s tastes over the years to better identify what one is and is not truly interested in.

Another part may be due to the fatigue involved with the effort of trying new things. This is particularly noticeable in MMOs and games as a service in general with how invested players can get making them less likely to branch out. Kind of a sunk cost issue there.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Paragon Lost

Honestly you have to look at Apple. They’ve never seriously made an effort to make it easy to support and use their client with games. For personal computing I don’t even think they’re 10 percent of the market on top of that.

Apple has been difficult the whole time that I’ve been interested in them as a personal platform. I’ve had a few Mac’s but they’ve always ended up secondary to my MS OS machines due to the difficulties. I’ve owned Amiga’s etc as well as an aside.

My recommendation to anyone who is an online gamer and loves Mac’s, snag a console and play games on that. Or be prepared to deal with Windows Emulators and never have the experience you deserve. I don’t blame game developers on this at all, I blame Apple.

Just like I blame Apple for their shitty iTunes application that I have to deal with it with my iPhone and their stubborn insistence on not updating it and making it work better. The loops I have to go through to correct every album that I add to it annoys me to no end. Specially with how my wife loves movie soundtracks and how Apple thinks it albums are bad and that we want our music listed as songs.

Turing fail
Reader
Turing fail

But Macs are sooo pretty… though not pretty enough to overcome all the obstacles you’ve noted. They’re like dating a really physically attractive person that none of your friends like because they make no effort to be likable.

As for iTunes, it should be categorized as malware and/or a psychological warfare weapon. I’m stuck with it until I upgrade my iPhone to an Android device.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Paragon Lost

lol, yup like the Apple Quicktime, a terrible thing and just as persistent and annoying.

swampylogs
Reader
swampylogs

I stopped buying Apple products after my first iPhone. When one of their updates released, I tried to install it but it would just give me an error message. I called Apple to ask how to resolve the error and they told me they couldn’t help me unless I purchased “AppleCare.” So customer support costs extra? Screw that

Celestia
Reader
Loyal Patron
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Celestia

I’d recommend any melee set with solid AOE like fire, staff, or spines paired with Radiation Armor on a tank, brute, or even a scrapper if you are looking for a sturdy and self sufficient character to play CoH with your kids when the husband isn’t available. The larger AOE range and number of targets on tanks makes everything even easier.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

Hey good rec! One of my mains is a Staff/Rad scrapper and I love her. I honestly hadn’t thought of her as a good cat-herder! :D