Sony confirms that the PlayStation 3, PSP, and Vita stores will shut down this year

We'll take "Rumors We Wanted To Be Wrong" for $800, Alex

    
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Well, bye...

It turns out that the rumor was true, unfortunately. Sony has confirmed that the online stores for the PlayStation 3, PSP, and PSP Vita will all be shuttered this year, with the former two shutting down on July 2nd and the Vita store remaining open for a little longer until August 27th. Past this point, no new titles can be purchased on these consoles and no DLC will be available for purchase.

Sony does promise that fans will still be able to download and install already purchased titles on these platforms, and of course you’ll be able to play anything already installed on the machines as normal. Still, this is a big deal for game archivists considering the volume of titles either primarily or solely available via digital distribution, meaning that aside from used disc copies becoming more valuable some titles could be lost forever to those who never bought them. From a practical standpoint, then… get those titles bought and installed now.

Source: Gamasutra
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Ardra Diva

that’s a shame. The PS3 was their real quantum-leap-forward product without any compromises. Blu-ray, HD, multi-core Cell processor, even an “install other OS” (linux) option when it launched.

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wjowski

“Software as service” ladies and gentlemen.

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rawhunger

*arr me mateys*

Andy Turner
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Andy Turner

once i took a brand new psp loaded with new software to las vegas and forgot the power supply and was like…

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Vanquesse V

Once more the preservation of video games will become entirely reliant on piracy and hacking.

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Greaterdivinity

You haven’t lost access to anything you own, it’s all still downloadable. You just can’t purchase them any longer from now-defunct consoles that are no longer supported. Preservation really only relies on having enough storage space for all this stuff, and thankfully most of those older titles being removed are pretty small. Piracy is still bad, and this is little different than Nintendo not making NES/SNES carts anymore.

Lame for sure, but Sony has done this previously with other storefronts. It’s a depressing business move, operating the storefront costs a lot more than just the backend data for download, and it likely will allow them to get rid of a bunch of legacy code from PSN that’s likely a technical hurdle (what I know of PSN is that it’s a technical nightmare and they’ve been making huge efforts to improve it starting in the PS4 era and continuing on through PS5).

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Vanquesse V

I’d say this is far worse than physical copies going out of print because while I can buy a second hand copy of Super Mario World and play that any time, once July rolls around there are a set of games I can no longer legally buy.
Preservation is more than ensuring existing owners are able to use what they spent money on in perpetuity.
I also have a hard time seeing why Sony being a repeat offender at this makes it any better.

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Greaterdivinity

And realistically, you can’t buy a TON of those old carts because they’re either destroyed or owned by folks that don’t want to sell them, either. I mean, outside of some mom and pop gaming stores that have retro stuff, you aren’t exactly going to walk into a Best Buy or GameStop and pick up a copy of Super Mario RPG for the SNES.

These games are preserved just fine. If you own it you can still freely download it at any time, and if you’re worried about that there are external storage options for you to back tons of games up just like on PC.

And Sony isn’t a “repeat offender”, this is standard shit. Microsoft has done it in the past with old OG Xbox titles/marketplaces (specifically the indie one IIRC), Nintendo routinely does this and is just as aggressive when taking down online stores. It’s a practical reality where maintaining legacy stores that nobody uses and just cost money don’t make sense, especially if removing those legacy stores removes potential technical issues.

Like, if anything it’s still probably superior for preservation to physical carts/dicks. Those can degrade and are subject to damage/scratches etc., and once they’re gone they’re gone. At least with a digital backup, especially if you’re super paranoid, you can store redundant backups in case any of the data for an individual backup gets corrupted for some reason or the hard drive fails.

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Vanquesse V

But on July 2nd no new copies are being sold, so for anyone that didn’t already buy those games NES games are infinitely more accessible than PSN games (at least if you want to stay within the confines of the law).
This is an industry wide problem and it’s not even a remotely new problem. I want *every* console maker and *every* publisher to show some responsibility in making sure the history of gaming isn’t lost to time.
There’s a period in early cinema that’s almost entirely lost as nobody thought to preserve it before it was too late, I’d rather not have a repeat of that.

EmberStar
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EmberStar

It’s actually mostly what the movie “Hugo” was about. The trailers made it look like some kind of Harry Potter mystery with a mysterious automaton and two kids and some kind of mystical adventure… but it was a somewhat fictionalized account of the history of very early silent cinema. And how a whole bunch of it was nearly lost forever. Partly because World War One happened, and nearly every single copy of every movie made before then was melted down because to the people in charge, the plastic it was printed on was worth more than the art.

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Bruno Brito

Piracy is still bad, and this is little different than Nintendo not making NES/SNES carts anymore.

Good luck with that.

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cursedseishi

You’re conflating ‘preservation’ with ownership somewhat. Preservation of games isn’t solely about ‘I have every copy of a game I owned’, it’s about ensuring a hard (and more importantly stable) copy exists in a format not prone to loss or degradation.

And to be completely fair and honest? This is an issue that affects the industry as a whole, not just the consumer side. Companies don’t even keep stable back-ups of games at times for releases as recent as the late 2000s (and beyond and more recent, at times), and that has adversely affected games going forward.
It’s why the ‘Silent Hill’ HD release was terrible, because Konami did not keep a back-up of the game’s codebase and assets at the time where the games (especially Silent Hill 2) went gold. Instead they had out-of-date assets pre-QA, and without anything or one set aside for helping with it.
It’s why the ‘Ninja Gaiden’ collection coming out soon uses arguably inferior ports of the first two games–because they didn’t keep stable back-ups and what was left was corrupted beyond use.

Hell, unless you own a physical CD for it you can’t even play the original Warcraft 3 by choice now! They dropped it from their digital storefront last I checked in favor of Reforged. And even then, they fundamentally broke aspects of the original game upon Reforged’s release that–again–are impossible to recover without owning a physical copy or having kept a version of the game prior to it installed and unupdated.

And, as strictly an aside here, not all ‘Piracy’ is bad. Let’s drop the corporate line the industry uses to shoot themselves in the foot. Just like ‘Homebrew’ isn’t ‘Piracy’, creating/obtaining a digital copy of some physical media isn’t all ‘Piracy’. It’s only been through ‘piracy’ that some software, abandoned and decades old by now, has been preserved in any form that could be considered functional. It’s why the Library of Congress has given exemptions regarding certain key points of physical and/or software-side locking or ‘DRM’ and bypassing it.
Good luck playing Prince of Persia (MS-DOS) without the manual, you’ll never know what potion will instant-kill you without it. Or, for more recent titles, trying to access them without needing to be verified 24/7 by a server that went dead years and years ago.
Heck, it’s also why they’ve allowed for Private Servers to exist for games like MMOs–so long as they follow specific guidelines and rules for it.

And, as for hacking? Yes, that can and is most usually bad… But it’s thanks to the big hack that happened to Nintendo that people were able to verify, test, and even use and make working certain obscure gameboy peripherals that never hit the market, or even left testing and thus help preserve and illuminate the history of an iconic device.
Again, something the industry is often not just resilient to… But downright aggressive against ever doing themselves.

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Jon Wax

Pretty selective use of piracy. Just because it benefits you it’s ok? If you grab something that you don’t own that’s stealing no matter how many memes you attach to it

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cursedseishi

That is adorable. Where in the world did I say any of the blatantly dishonest garbage in your post, or meme’d about it?

I didn’t. You are well within your rights to own a digital back-up of software you own, that has held up and long been tolerated. Nowhere in my post did I say it was fine to obtain a digital copy of something you don’t own like you’re asserting I said in your tepid little blurb.

And no, saying ‘Piracy as the Games Industry uses it is a false narrative’ isn’t a meme. There is a blatantly clear distinction, one that–again–has now even been held up and supported by The Library of Congress. Three specific exemptions against the DMCA act have been set by them, and they are in relation to;
1) Obsolete/dead software (abandonware essentially) and physical DRM protections tied to them.
2) Software-side DRM, specifically games that are offline that are rendered dysfunctional by server-based DRM that are no longer running
and
3) Server-Based Games/software such as MMOs that are no longer in operation by their companies/rights holders–so long as the code has been obtained legally.

All for the purposes of Preserving games, which this whole thing is about. And what whatever blithering spurt you spat up there clearly wasn’t about–or even understanding.