Chinese police team up with Tencent to take down a video game cheating ring

    
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Accurate.

It was an illegal organization being taken down by the Chinese police force in a concentrated operation. It involved $76 million being made, with $46 million of assets seized by police including a number of luxury automobiles. It involved multiple arrests and an international scheme. It has everything you’d expect to see from some sort of summer blockbuster, aside from the fact that it actually happened… and it was apparently all focused around cheating in online video games. Life is wild.

Yes, gigantic Chinese gaming company Tencent teamed up with the authorities to take out this particular cheating organization, which was selling cheats for games ranging from Call of Duty Mobile to Overwatch. The sheer value has the authorities involved calling the world’s biggest organized cheating ring, but we’re still kind of hung up on whole “huge operation taking down video game cheating” part of things. That feels like a lot.

Source: BBC; thanks to Arktouros for the tip!
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Todd Conners

It’s cool that the police are coming together and helping to make such important decisions for the gaming industry. I recently read about police brutality on this page. But I was amazed that there are such different types of police officers, some behave too brazenly and some help to correct mistakes and support in solving various issues. The gaming industry really needs the support of the police, perhaps not just cyber and ordinary police.

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John Mclain

Nice to see some good news for once. Now we just need a list sent out of everyone who bought the cheats from them so they can be put to the stake too. Or you know… just send them to China for sentencing, same thing.

Saluka
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Saluka

Tencent is involved with alot of activities that are outside administration approval says my random third party no sourced statement.

Turing fail
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Turing fail

Guess they didn’t give Xi Jinping his cut…

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Utakata

…sometimes all it take is comparing their leader to Winnie-the-Pooh. /sigh

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rdizzy C

Nice, wish they would do this in other countries as well, just the looming threat alone would stop most of it since these losers are probably petrified at the thought of jail.

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Katzvariak

Well, most cheats nowadays costs up to 50$ to 100$ for very sophisticated version and VERY hard to detect. Can even bypass HWID Bans.

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Bruno Brito

Sounds like a great use of taxpayer money.

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Kickstarter Donor
Greaterdivinity

With the potential revenue from the seizure of assets? Probably, yeah. $46M is quite a chunk of change.

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Bruno Brito

With the potential revenue from the seizure of assets?

I had forgotten about that. I stand corrected.

And this made me remember that civil forfeiture exists. Thanks, GD. If you don’t mind, i’ll have a communistic meltdown in the corner.

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Kickstarter Donor
Greaterdivinity

This is extremely different than civil forfeiture, thankfully. Think of, for example, the expensive ostrich jacket the FBI seized in the US not too long ago : P

I ain’t got no problems with law enforcement/government seizing property and profits that were “earned” via actually illegal means.

But civil forfeiture itself in the US…yeah. Don’t worry, you’ll have some company. I’ll even bring some herbs with me since that’s legal in my area. We can just try to forget.

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Bruno Brito

I know it is different. Just made me remember. Bleh

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Utakata

1) It isn’t their money anymore once it’s left their hands.

2) I’m pretty sure it’s one the last thing they worry about over there.

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Arktouros

That’s just a crazy amount of money for a cheating operation. I mean you knew it was profitable, but that amount of money is just bonkers.

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Kickstarter Donor
Greaterdivinity

Seriously…I never thought cheat makers were operating on shoestring budgets or anything, there’s enough money to earn some decent cash most likely. But like…this is wild.

You’d figure that if you’re operating something like an illegal cheat engine you’d try to be a bit more under the radar and not have like a dozen cars that all cost hundreds of thousands of dollars a piece >.>

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Jim Bergevin Jr

Just goes to show you how many people would just rather cheat than play fairly for all. It’s a real damn shame.

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Slaasher

This!! I imagine that this is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of “cheating rings” so just imagine the massive number of everyday people out there spending hundreds of dollars each on cheating to win at a game.
It boggles.

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Jon Wax

Change rather to have to

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Jon Wax

Turns out a lotta gamers suck at gaming

Who knew?

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Armsman

There’s a reason ‘Gold Selling’ companies (and other types of online pay for advantage illegally) persist and have international websites. It’s profitable until your busted of course; and law enforcements busts of this kind is rare in any country.