The Daily Grind: Do you play MMOs as the designers intended, or do you go your own way?

    
22

Today’s Daily Grind topic comes courtesy of MOP’s resident meme-maker, Schlag Sweetleaf, who urged me to write about this after the piece we did on the player-organized Crashcog Cup in World of Warcraft, which relied entirely on player “dungeon masters” to guide the race along. In other words, it was basically players looking at the structure, goals, and rewards of the MMO as set out by the designers, and then… doing something totally different, making up their own game inside the MMO.

“It brought me back to a time in Dark Age of Camelot,” he told me, “when [the Mordred server PvP] had pretty much failed in its design. I made a Warden, a super defensive character with great survivability at the cost of any real damage output. I set about collecting trophies as best I could, solo and sometimes with my running buddy. It made the game much more interesting to me at that point, and I still carry many memories of that time.”

This is one of my favorite things to do inside MMOs – to set my own goals and not be fussed by what the game is trying to get me to do. Putting on plays, running treasure hunts, attending cantina night, even dropping stuff, it’s all born from intrinsic motivation, and so it’s the stuff we’re more likely to cherish and remember.

How about you? Do you play MMOs as the designers intended, or do you go your own way?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
Advertisement

No posts to display

22
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Saluka
Reader
Saluka

Just for fun try to do the obscure thing every now and than just because like not PvPing in a PvP game and still making progress or make a strange build that can kill stuff way over powered by being excessively dodgey or tankey because of odd stat choices and strange gear selection.

EmberStar
Reader
EmberStar

I play survival games like Ark and Conan Exiles as single player games. I play Warframe and Star Trek Online solo as much as possible. So yes, I probably do not play games “as the designers intended.”

EmberStar
Reader
EmberStar

I mean, the survival games DO have a single player mode, and Warframe does allow solo play. It’s clearly something the designers anticipated and made allowances for, because it’s built into the code. It’s just probably not the primary way they intended for people to interact with the game.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

I am a little curious as to what the singular “as designers intended way” is, if indeed it exists at all???

But I do not ever consider what the designers want in regard to How I play so I suppose the answer is no. I do my own thing, always.

It is always better to be the wolf than the sheep as they say, I am no follower. I am non-conformist by design, contrary through and through in all aspects of my life :) utilizing my independent ability to think and decided for myself in all things has always been something I value greatly and adhere to.

I could care less what the designers wanted in regards to “how” I play something I pay for and use my time to enjoy.

Reader
Ardra Diva

I avoid PvP like the plague, so if there’s a way to do that, I do it. Which probably goes against the game devs’ designs, but that’s me.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Ashfyn Ninegold

I like games that reward me no matter how I play.

I start playing the way the devs intended and don’t stray too far from that until I get a sense of what they’re up to.

I prefer the older MMOs because there’s just more possibilities there than the newer ones, which are mostly on-rails, quest-line locked.

Remember when you could go into some rarely traveled corner of an open world MMO and find a quest there by picking up an odd object? Or find an NPC with a quest for you that wasn’t part of the required quest line? Or a chest containing a silly reward for just being adventurous?

Reader
styopa

I like games that enable this and encourage players to make their own goals.

Not so fond of games whose content is so bleh, capped, or expired that this is the ONLY way to find enjoyment in the game.

It is a fine line, I recognize.

Reader
Hirku Two

I play as the designers intended, because if I wasn’t interested in the experience they’re trying to create why would I even be there in the first place? If I want a linear themepark or an open sandbox I’ll play one of those games, not try to brute force one gameplay style onto an opposing type of game.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Ken from Chicago

Their way. If I get bored then my way.

Also, isn’t this how game mods and machinima got started? Also, costume contests?

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Pandalulz

I currently play FFXIV and I admit it’s pretty hard to get off the beaten path in that game. I suppose I could fall down the crafting/housing hole and get sidetracked, but that’s not really my thing. I think I play FFXIV mostly for what it does with its linear path and story.

Reader
Brown Jenkin

Easily the most frustrating thing about the dominance of themepark design is the assertion that there is one right way to play. In their defense GW2 and ESO have done a good job of bucking this trend, I love just wandering off the beaten train of quests to explore, gather or whatever else. Wish that was a more feasible approach in games.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Ken from Chicago

Adding sandbox features to a thempark increases more ways to have fun in-game and increases player retention.

Ergo, the call for customizable costumes, lateral progression and player housing