Book of Travels explains its no-quest design philosophy

    
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In case you never really clocked this, one of the many reasons that Book of Travels will be different than your typical MMO is that its eschewing the traditional quest design found in pretty much all MMORPGs. Instead, Book of Travels wants players to go on a free-form journey during which things happen and choices are made to form a unique experience.

It’s a little hard to wrap your head around, which is why Might and Delight put together a dev blog to explain how adventuring sessions might go. Basically, there will be a variety of special encounters and shifting events that will be spread out among all of the playerbase.

“Whatever kinds of encounters you have, their course and pattern will emerge from the choices you make on the road,” the studio said. “Since there is no linear plot through which to advance, Travellers will instead come across many story strands to weave together along the way, but not every player will hold the same threads.”

Source: Steam
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Saluka
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Saluka

Problem with dynamic events is once you hit level cap unless there is a reason to do them then players generally won’t and the change you make gets reset for the event to happen again. It does however sound like a great levelling experience.

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treehuggerhannah

This sounds really neat. It also sounds incredibly ambitious to sustain and scale up to the whole playerbase.

It reminds me a little of what Cyan wanted to do with Uru Live. Unfortunately that never quite came together for them for reasons I could write an essay about, but I always liked the concept.

I look forward to giving Book of Travels a try.

Relmharver
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Relmharver

Sounds like they’re just going for randomly assigned quests rather than linear quests.

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Adam Russell

Bold strategy. Lets see if it pays off for them.

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Bhagpuss Bhagpuss

This gives me flashbacks to the early days of GW2, when map chat was an almost never-ending flood of “What do I do now?”, “Where do I go next?” “Who do I talk to?”. I wonder how much attitude and understanding has changed in a decade – the absence of a clear, linear quest progression certainly seemed to confuse a lot of people back then.

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Vanquesse V

I wonder that as well, though in this case not having a clear goal seem to be the selling point of the game