Can you sell your Ashes of Creation account? Intrepid says ‘no.’

    
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This may come as less-than-glorious news for Ashes of Creation supporters: Intrepid Studios has lowered the boom against the sale or transfer of accounts between players.

Previously, Intrepid was ambiguous on the subject because of the difficulty of enforcing such a ban, but it looks like now the studio is ready to take action against handing off accounts. This is against the terms of service and may end up triggering a full ban.

“Transferring of accounts and other forms of player RMTs diminish the accomplishments of others, and destabilizes the intended experience of the game for our players,” the studio posted. “Any account found to have been sold, shared, or accessed by a person other than the account creator may result in permanent closure of the account. This may also be applied retroactively against accounts that have been found in the past to have violated this policy.”

Ashes of Creation’s Alpha One test is slated to run this month.

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G I G A B E A R

Intrepid says they are enforcing this policy “now,” yet my $2500 PI account was banned WRONGLY, for violating it in May of last year. In reality, I was gifted it (and upgraded it into PI with my own money, so no NDA was breached) while it was still permissible under the terms. However, it was also refunded so I did not have a need to pursue the issue further.

So, why then do they raise a point about a policy they were already enforcing? My opinion, it’s all about trying to stop people from selling once the NDA drops and the game starts being judged harshly.

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Rndomuser

Third-party websites say “yes”, to any MMORPG ;-)

Transferring of accounts and other forms of player RMTs diminish the accomplishments of others

That is just a lie. And instead of lying about it, smart company should use this opportunity to earn extra profit, by allowing people to legitimately transfer account ownership for a specific fee, regardless of the reason they may be doing this (it is perfectly OK if some person might level up their account, get bored with it then decide to gift it to a friend).

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uplinknetwork

As long as people need to eat and provide food for themselves and their families, RMT will always exist :)

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Rndomuser

Of course it will, and like I said, a smart company should just embrace it and provide this option through themselves instead of forcing people to rely on suspicious third-party websites. For example I’d gladly pay Blizzard themselves for a fully leveled WoW Classic character (instant boost by Blizzard or leveled by other player and sold through Blizzard) instead of relying on “website X” where a seller can just get sold account back after few months even if I will change e-mail/password/secret phrase.

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uplinknetwork

I agree.

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Solaris

Pretty much every MMO developer ever has taken this stance. Why is this news?

Bree Royce
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Bree Royce

“Previously, Intrepid was ambiguous on the subject because of the difficulty of enforcing such a ban, but it looks like now the studio is ready to take action against handing off accounts.”

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G I G A B E A R

Replying directly to affirm that IS did indeed ban for this well before today.

Unless of course that was a “just for Gigabear” situation, which there have of course been many.

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dkhunter

I realize these policies are popular with a lot of MMO players, but we have two decades of experience with MMO community to show these are overwhelmingly not effective; they can find and ban sellers, but not buyers, so the market never goes away. It has not gotten harder in the past decade to buy gold and accounts; it’s gotten much, much easier. If they’re going to have a policy like this, I want to hear about how they have a plan for a dedicated, well staffed enforcement unit to investigate cases of suspected RMT with an appeal process to make sure it’s fair.

Does that sound impractical? Fantastical? I agree, it probably is. And so the way to deal with this is not to ban RMT, it’s to make game design choices that discourage it. WoW Tokens certainly didn’t solve RMT in retail, but they helped a lot; and they make Blizzard a lot of money. I realize that’s not a popular opinion, but there seems to be a lot of denial around this subject; it’s not 2005, you can’t stop RMT by policing eBay. You can Google marketplaces that are safe and secure; there’s lots of dad gamers out there with tons of disposable income they’d happily spend on a video game, not to mention the no-lifers. That’s not going to change.