WoW Factor: The ethics of playing on private World of Warcraft servers right now

    
92
Through the fire and the flames

There’s a problem to be found when it comes to World of Warcraft, and that problem is Blizzard Entertainment. That is a known fact at this point. You either don’t need me to reiterate the problems with the studio at this point or you’re willfully ignoring those problems, and in either case re-linking the articles you have probably already read about this is probably not necessary. (We’re going to do it anyhow, though, just so we’re all on the same page.) But for some people… well, the urge to play WoW is still there.

This has resulted in an interesting question that I’ve gotten asked on more than a few occasions now: In the wake of everything happening at Blizzard, is it ethical to play on a private server at this point? Is it a morally defensible action? Is it the right way to play WoW, or is it still a bad thing? And… well, that’s what we’re going to talk about today.

First and foremost, let’s establish something right out of the gate: Regardless of the hypothetical ethics, it is still against the terms of service. These servers are not permitted under the terms of service, and they can be shut down and stopped at any time. You might argue that Blizzard doesn’t really want the bad press it might entail at this point, but I’m willing to bet that no one there particularly cares.

More to the point, none of this is changing what has been our longstanding policy at Massively Overpowered. When it comes to rogue servers for shut down games, we’ll cover them; rogue servers for currently operating games are a no-no. We are not advocating that anyone rush out and start violating terms of agreement and risking their accounts or worse. This is not a repository to talk about rogue servers but a hypothetical discussion of whether or not the ethics of this particular situation have changed.

Everyone clear on that? Probably not, but let’s forge ahead anyhow.

Oh, so they get to just fly under their own power, that's fair.

First and foremost, the question has to be raised about whether or not withholding support from Blizzard is ethical. Thankfully, that’s a pretty easy question to answer because it’s a straightforward yes. I know that some people have tried to argue that what you’re doing there is hurting the lower-tier workers rather than the corporate side of things, but I don’t think that argument holds up.

Why? Well, for one thing, that’s basically arguing that if you’re disgusted by Blizzard’s actions (as you should be), the proper thing to do is to not in any way alter your habits or stop supporting the company financially. That rings false right out of the gate. Second, it also presupposes that the company will change not as a result of falling profits or users but out of sheer goodness, which is almost prima facie ridiculous. And third, the idea that you’re hurting the workers by failing to support the company is acting as if Blizzard hasn’t already spent the last several years laying people off en masse when profits were up.

Spoilers: The company has absolutely done that multiple times, to the point that we were dragging it for that before all of the hideous abuse allegations came out. Without going too deep into the arguments necessary here, I’m not making an argument against voting with your wallet but for Blizzard employees unionizing to protect themselves, and that has nothing to do with the ethics of no longer paying for the company’s products.

So we’ve established that yes, it is morally justified and reasonable to stop paying Blizzard money. But that is not the same thing as discussing whether or not it’s ethical to essentially take the company’s work and play it for free, and that’s what we’re talking about when we talk about rogue servers.

No, the argument doesn’t change if you pay money to support the server development. Sit down.

Here’s the thing: This is not the first time that it’s been ethical to say that you don’t want to give money to Blizzard. That’s a settled matter. But in order to make playing on a rogue server to be a justifiable action, you have to do two things. The first is prove how this is orders of magnitude worse than prior incidents; the second is provide a justification for why this previously unethical action is now a correct one.

Fortunately for those who do want to go down this road, the former is pretty easy. A woman is dead, and you can draw a direct line between the callousness of Blizzard leadership and her death. That’s… more than enough! It’s really enough at that point to say that this is far worse than any of the other ways that the studio has screwed things up over the past few years.

But justifying a rogue server? Well, that runs into a problem because WoW is not something you require to sustain your life or are forever entitled to. As with any other form of ongoing entertainment, it is possible that you will no longer want to enjoy it for various reasons, but this does not inherently entitle you to continue having access to it, nor does it mean that something is going wrong when you are no longer interested in what the game has become.

However, I do think there’s an ethical justification here. Because the point being made is not that you are somehow entitled to WoW… it’s more that the difference between your play and lack thereof is influenced first and foremost by the studio and the mechanics of the game.

Oh dear.

We’re never going to know exactly how much rogue servers influenced the eventual decision to make WoW Classic an actual product that you could pay Blizzard money for, in no small part because even if the answer was “a lot,” there’s a distinct motivation not to say that. But it seems clear that there was some influence there no matter what. People wanted to play that classic version of the game for various reasons, to the point that Blizzard even left the option in place after turning on the next expansion.

Blizzard, as a corporate entity right now, wants to have two things happen. The first is for everyone to stop thinking about the fact that the company is being sued from multiple angles for grotesque behavior that upper leadership shielded for ages. The second, though, is for people to come back to WoW in numbers that they haven’t come back in a long time.

And to a certain extent, playing on servers that are still running some version of the game can be used to send that message. The audience is there. The interest is there. The two things that are stopping it from coming back en masse have more to do with how the game is being run and the corporate culture rather than being some deep philosophical split with WoW.

So is it ethical? Well… the short answer is kind of a “maybe,” which I admit is a wishy-washy way of putting things. It’s definitely not something that I, personally, would recommend that you do. It’s probably not a great idea. But the argument can be made that there is an ethical justification for it, and there’s definitely a justification for not wanting to give Blizzard your money any more – even if you’re not willing to go the rogue server route.

War never changes, but World of Warcraft does, with a decade of history and a huge footprint in the MMORPG industry. Join Eliot Lefebvre each week for a new installment of WoW Factor as he examines the enormous MMO, how it interacts with the larger world of online gaming, and what’s new in the worlds of Azeroth and Draenor.
Advertisement

No posts to display

92
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Allen Martin Bair

So, the way I see it, if you’ve never paid a dime to Blizzard for WoW and you play on a private server, yeah, I can see how that might be unfair to those who worked on it. However, if you’ve paid for the game, paid for the expansions, and paid your monthly subscription for a year or more, you’re looking at having paid Blizzard in excess of $500 already for the right to play WoW. I think at that point, you’ve already done due diligence in making sure the devs get paid for their art.

Reader
Robert Andle

I find it quite funny that people are actually debating whether it’s ethical to play on private servers due to current issues with Blizzard. Of course it isn’t. That’s a bit like asking if it’s ethical to rob from a shop because you don’t like the owner.

I played on private servers for years and never gave a damn about the ethics of it. Why should I? It means nothing to me. I now play Classic on official servers and love the game. I’m certainly not going to worry about issues with Blizzard and I’ll carry on playing their games for as long as I want.

Reader
Roger Melly

I am mostly reluctant to play on private servers anyway because I don’t know what nasties are lurking in the download . When I have done it with City of Heroes its been on an older laptop .

While its not legal to play on a WoW server I can understand why people might want to do it if they wish to continue playing the game given how unethical Blizzard’s actions have been in the past .

Or alternatively people could just switch over to ff14 , I am not playing it myself but I know a lot of old guildmates who have jumped ship some of whom have been playing WoW since the beginning . People who I never thought would leave .

Reader
Bruno Brito

Honestly, that’s the most plausible reason for not wanting to be around pservers.

My tips normally condense into: Find a good torrent to download, normally one that has a lot of people seeding and peering. Don’t use your normal email and passcode to make an account. Create a burner email. Avoid logging into sketchy pserver sites. Go for the more famous and established, like Warmane.

Funny enough, Ragnarok private servers are more secure than Official :D

Reader
draugris

A discussion about [playing WoW] is good, but imo people should focus more on supporting the people who work there, making unions strong etc. I don’t see blocking change anything, change has to come from within.

I understand everybody playing on a private server if they are unhappy with the state of classic at the moment.

(Edited by mod to remove insults/trolling)

Reader
angrakhan

In the wake of everything happening at Blizzard, is it ethical to play on a private server at this point? Is it a morally defensible action?

No. It’s not. It’s piracy plain and simple. It’s like saying you disagree with the management of the local car dealership, so now it’s morally defensible to steal cars from them. Blizzard is an entertainment service provider. So is your local restaurant. If you wouldn’t walk out of the restaurant without paying the bill then you shouldn’t be playing on private servers.

Your opinion of Kotic’s compensation package is irrelevant, as is your opinion of the current legal situation with the sexual harassment. You’re breaking the law.

P.S. you do not “own” one piece of software on your computer. You own a license to that software. That license can be revoked. Read your TOS.

Reader
rawhunger

P.S. you do not “own” one piece of software on your computer. You own a license to that software. That license can be revoked. Read your TOS.

P.P.S.: Thank Bill Gates and Microsoft for that. Another less-than-ethical company.

Reader
BadassCondor

I don’t think any argument could convince me that it is somehow unethical to play an old video game that I’ve already spent thousands of dollars over the decades. No law is being broken, and I don’t see it as being unethical to break the unfair EULA of an unethical company. Blizzard’s new Nazi-defending lawyers may be mad, Bobby Kotick may get only a $155,000,000 bonus instead of a $156,000,000, but I don’t care, nor does it go against my moral values.

Also, I just want to point out that ethics as subjective. As an Arab, my sense of ethics are very different than most of you. I don’t care about the feelings or profits of a company that has acted on the behalf of a government currently conducting a genocide.

Reader
styopa

“So is it ethical? Well… the short answer is kind of a “maybe,”…the argument can be made that there is an ethical justification for it…”
No, there’s literally no gray area here.

I’m pretty sure that morality has never multiplied negatives to get a positive, like math. Stealing from a bad dude doesn’t make it ‘not stealing’. It may be justifiable, your motivations may be moral but the act is still immoral.

Robin Hood may have been justified, but he was still a thief.
And it’s CERTAINLY not ethical because there’s no caveat in law that exonerates people from crimes against criminals.

So rationalize all you want, it’s neither moral nor ethical.
I played – and paid for – private servers before classic WoW was a thing. (I didn’t try to claim either was ethical or moral, btw.)

If I had to play one now, I enjoyed Ascension. Creative as hell and stable when I played.

As I said at the time, if Blizzard just would open a vanilla server themselves, I’d much rather pay them. So when they did, I did, and didn’t continue to pay or play private servers.

Reader
BadassCondor

Robin hood was a thief in the eyes of the rich, and a hero in the eyes of the poor who believed that the rich had stolen from them. It is subjective.

Somehow related, but I personally view being too rich as unethical. If someone today were to hack into Jeff Bezos’ bank account (this is a simplified scenario) and redistribute $50,000,000,000 to all Amazon employees (not even half his net worth) , then I would view that hacker as a hero, a good person, and someone who is ethical. I won’t allow the rich and powerful to color my ethics or moral values for their benefit.

Reader
styopa

“I personally view being too rich as unethical.”

Then you must think it’s ok if most of the people in the world would call YOU unethical?

Is that fair? Do you think you’re unethical because of how rich you are?

You understand that – if you’re even middle class in the Western World – that to maybe 75% of the developing world, you are indistinguishably rich from Bezos?

Your house, your car, your lifestyle, your luxuries, your paycheck – to someone who makes about $2000/year (that’s the WORLD AVERAGE per capita income – note that half are below even that) even someone at the poverty line in the west is almost inconceivably wealthy?

Reader
Bruno Brito

That’s just an assumption.

Reader
styopa

That I assume someone in the world is poorer than BadAssCondor (great name, btw)? I guarantee it.

I would cheerfully wager you $100 that’s true.

Reader
Bruno Brito

No. It’s an assumption that you think that poor people have some sort of vendetta against everyone who has money and not against the sources of corrupt power. I’m poor. I don’t hate the medium class or the medium-high class as much as i hate rich people.

Just because we’re poor, doesn’t mean we’re dumb.

Reader
styopa

But look at what you just said?
You specifically hate rich people more. No qualifications. No exemptions.

Literally, by your assertion, if someone had $10,000 in their pocket (if someone has that in walking-around money, I’d call them rich) you’d hate them just for that because you assume they “must have” done something evil to have it.
Hate’s a pretty strong word.

You don’t see that as superficial, really?

“Anyone who has a lot more $ than me, I hate them” – that’s pretty hard to parse away from envy, no matter how you rationalize it.

How much logically different would that be from someone saying, say “I hate poor people, just because they’re poor.” We can agree that would be stupid, yes?

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

A lot of people who read and comment here aren’t American or middle class westerners, including the person you’re talking to, as he noted elsewhere in the thread. One more reason to avoid ad hominem when trying to sort through local biases in ethics.

Reader
styopa

There was no ad-hominem there.

My point (and I did say IF you’re middle class in the western world) remains: expressing moral or ethical judgements based on the amount of $ in someone’s pockets is silly.

The point is that there is ALWAYS someone much worse off than you, so if you point your finger up the hill and say “they must be bad to be so rich” you *have* to accept that there are people who are doing exactly the same to you from below.

I find envy corrosive and toxic.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

Trying to call out hypocrisy is ad hom, not an argument, and it crumbles when you miss your mark.

Condemning greed isn’t the same as envy either. And that’s clearly what he was getting at when he said “too rich.”

I don’t see anything in spam or trash from you, so not sure what you think got automodded?

Reader
styopa

Didn’t mean to suggest my post was killed, but when I reply to badasscondor or bruno, my post appeared immediately.
When I replied to you, it didn’t – I figured it went to ‘review first’ bin, that’s all.

EDIT: and FYI this one did appear immediately.

Reader
BadassCondor

Then you must think it’s ok if most of the people in the world would call YOU unethical?

You understand that – if you’re even middle class in the Western World

You shouldn’t make me the personal target of your argument. I am not even close to being rich as you think I might be. I’m probably middle class in a third world country, and even then I do my part by giving zakat as much as I am able. Zakat is a sort of obligatory charity that exists in my region. Although this isn’t a regional issue. There are plenty of rich princes and barons in my area that hoard wealth from oil while people here starve. That said, none of this has to do with the original topic of discussion.

However still, if you want to argue that someone who is middle class in America does not have the right to condemn the rich and corporations, I will let my disagreement be known.

Reader
styopa

First, thanks for reminding me that there’s a world of voices here.

But the fact that my example doesn’t apply to you doesn’t change my point: it’s superficial to decide if a person is good or bad by the amount of money (or lack of it) in their pocket. It’s as superficial as deciding whether they’re good or bad based on their skin color or clothing.

Bill Gates has donated over $50 BILLION to important causes like world wide childhood immunisation, things governments aren’t fixing…he’s still rich, is he bad?

Mark Zuckerberg has pledged that he’s giving away 99% of his wealth, not leaving it to his children. I believe Warren Buffett has made similar arrangements.

Musk has used his billions to make electric cars viable and more importantly, cool enough that the general public wants them. That may have advanced the fight against climate change in huge ways over the next century. He certainly didn’t do it with the expectation of getting rich from it. Same with his space x program – he cannot be doing that expecting to make money, he’s throwing $billions at projects the government is too distracted to invest in but may advance the very survival of humanity in space.

Same with Bezos and Blue Origin, although the envy-fuelled narrative lately was about “he should have spent his $$ on poor people instead of a joy ride!” C’mon. This guy is – as of 2016 – burning $1 bn/year from his pocket to make space flight cheaper and that helps everyone. I think if you’ve poured $8 bn into a project that is unlikely to ever benefit you personally, maybe, just maybe, you’re entitled to a single joyride.

I’d argue that stealing from them to give everyone else about the equivalent of a free dinner would be itself grossly immoral. Their big piles of money can do big good things (in Bill Gates case, already is) that tiny little piles can never do.

There are certainly rich people that are bad people, just like there are poor people that are bad.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

If these are your examples of “good billionaires,” you have already lost the argument. It takes only a tiny bit of research into each of them to learn their misdeeds. The position here was that nobody comes by a billion ethically to begin with; rich men become rich by abusing workers, markets, environments, or taxes, so the “charity” that might trickle down from vanity projects isn’t impressive at all. And it’s an ancient idea that stands the test of time.

And again I say unto you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.

Again, criticizing obscene greed is not the same as envy. I would not trade places with any of them.

Reader
styopa

Isn’t that the same book that says stuff like “And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?”

I mean, if we’re going to cherry-pick dueling comments from an ancient philosophy?

It also says stuff like “I permit no woman to teach or to have authority over men; she is to keep silent.” if we want to look for truly silly stuff?

As you put it, “their misdeeds” just wipe away what else they’ve done. Really?

You think that spending TENS OF BILLIONS fighting HIV/AIDs, tuberculosis, and malaria and giving MILLIONS of children immunizations they’d otherwise never have gotten are meaningless in the face of “their misdeeds”?
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/bill-gates-most-beautiful-chart-world-tweet-child-deaths-a8210331.html
(Not Gates alone, but Buffet as well – they see 122 million childrens’ lives saved over the last 25 years.)

You must be a saintly person to stand in such judgement. I wouldn’t dare, myself.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

Meaningless to those saved? I never said nor implied that. Redemptive for the billionaires? That I addressed – and definitely not. Plenary indulgences by another name. Get some better heroes.

And surely you’re not suggesting that certain types of stealing are acceptable in the service of a greater good. That would almost be like… “stealing” playtime on an emu to avoid becoming financially complicit in a company’s misdeeds.

Reader
styopa

Oh I absolutely believe ends justify means all the time.
We CONSTANTLY live with those sorts of rationalizations and compromises, or we don’t honestly think about them.

I’m genuinely curious at your morality here. It seems staggeringly judgemental and monumentally unforgiving.

Is it fair for me to interpret that your position is that there is no way someone who’s ever made a mistake can redeem themselves as long as they remain wealthy?
Even if they give away 99% of their wealth?

Or is that characterization unfair?
I really don’t want to build a strawman out of your position.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Are you REALLY using Bezos as an argument for a good billionaire?

Dude. Respect your and our inteligence a bit more.

Reader
styopa

Yeah, I would.
You see Bezos as the Devil Incarnate, perhaps?

On the other hand, I see 800,000 people with jobs that pay them money…and considering how they’re employed today, they likely would be nearly unemployable anywhere else (or they’d be there already).

Are they good jobs? Nope, I wouldn’t say so.

Bree Royce
Staff
Bree Royce

Oh ffs.

Reader
Rndomuser

It’s not ethical because you’re still stealing (using someone’s product for free without explicit permission by the creator, which was Blizzard), regardless what immoral things the creator did. Personally I would never do that, but if others want to do that – they can, just without using some lame rationalizations for their unethical behavior.

Reader
warroth weill

Hosting a private server is copyright infringement(dependent on various regions etc.)

Playing on a private server is against the Blizzard EULA, but it is not against any sort of laws.

We bought the client and we’re able to do whatever we want to the files on our computers.. But we didn’t buy the server software.

Which that is just basic copyright law. It doesn’t need to be in the EULA because it’s not a document we need to agree to. It’s just the law.

Reader
Rndomuser

It doesn’t matter what is legal or not, the question was about ethics. And it is absolutely unethical to use WoW client to play on private servers without Blizzard’s explicit permissions. Just like it is unethical to, for example, watch movies for free through illegal streaming websites even though it was not you who made the copy of the movie available to be viewed for free.

Reader
warroth weill

I consider playing private wotlk servers ethical for example because Blizzard does not provide that service. I find it ethical to play any private server as long as you are subbed to the retail game. This is a very individual question. To simply say it’s unethical to play on private servers is dumb af.

Big wow content creators openly admit they are/ have been playing private servers, as well as regular players on their forums. But they contribute to Blizzards products so Blizzard doesn’t even care about it. Stop being such a snowflake and “I am Mr good person”.

And who cares about ethics when it comes to Blizzard anyway lol? Again, each case is individual but good to hear you are a good boi that would never play on a private server.

Reader
Bruno Brito

And it is absolutely unethical

Debatable. I find absolute no moral qualm to not giving a shit about some minor issues that a 72 billion dollar company may have. Morals and ethics are things i think about when severe situations come, not for playing games.

Reader
Khrome

Whether or not it is unethical hinges on whether you define the laws which govern this as unethical or not, and that’s a derived argument which stems from a completely different discussion.

Your argument hinges on the notion that all laws are ethical, which also implies that the laws which allow billionaires to avoid paying any taxes whatsoever are ethical, or that the laws which allow banks to foreclose on homes are ethical, to name some simple examples.

Laws are not by definition ethical.

Reader
Rndomuser

Whether or not it is unethical hinges on whether you define the laws which govern this as unethical or not

Absolutely not. It is irrelevant what laws say, whatever you do may still be unethical even if the law allows you to do it.

Reader
Khrome

That’s exactly my point. As i read it, your argument about it being unethical to play on pservers without Blizzard’s permission hinges on it being illegal in some form, by originally positing that it’s ‘stealing’ – However that depends on how you define that term legally rather than ethically.

Legally the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, but ethically they are ‘stealing’ that wealth. If the poor ‘steal’ from the rich – Mind you that the people who worked on the game don’t own it, the company, and by extension the shareholders do – Is that unethical as well?

Eliot and Bree made their points quite clear as to why pservers could or would be ethical, and they acknowledged that there is some ‘stealing’ going on. However, it would be unethical – in my opinion – to judge something as ethical or not based on a single argument without considering the extended circumstances we are currently finding ourselves in with regard to Blizzard games specifically.

Your argument also presupposes that Blizzard, as an entity, is ethically entitled to the content that the company did not create: It’s employees created it, yet they receive virtually no benefits from what they have created while those who had no hand in it reap the benefits. Pservers are, in essence, stealing from the shareholders, not the creators of the game, and i do return back to my original point as to whether or not this can even be called stealing in the first place.

Is it possible to steal something which has already been stolen, when viewed within a moral and ethical framework?

Reader
Khrome

We didn’t buy the server software, but there’s no law against writing your own. Reverse engineering software is legal in both the US and EU.

That said, the original software is not available, so there’s a big question as to whether writing the server software from scratch while only being able to deduce its functions from the client software constitutes reverse engineering, as far as i know.

Either way, hosting the server is legal. Where copyright law comes in is the content being hosted (mostly the stuff in the database), not the software itself.

Reader
Bruno Brito

I’m going to say this in the simplest way that i can:

Playing WoW pservers is totally up to you all. I’m not someone to argue the ethics of playing videogames, nor do i care for the ethics of telling a 72billion dollar corporation to go die in a fire. It doesn’t matter.

BUT. And this is a huge one: The WoW pserver scene is AWFUL. I’m not joking here. You need to use the reddit to find the best ones because the reddit is the major congregation, and that reddit is a cesspool of humanity. The average playerbase on pservers is also extremely full of issues, ranging from rampant racism to blind zealotry.

I’ve been playing pservers during my entire WoW time, and they are not a pleasant place if you don’t find like-minded individuals. The vocal people are worse because of how much softer and weaker the scrutiny to that is.

Pick your poison. My recommendation? Play Warmane for Wrath. Tauri for MOP. MAYBE play Darrowshire for Vanilla. If Atlantiss Netherwing is still up, play that for TBC. Stay away from the rest.

PS: I’ll go for the old adage here:

“It’s always ethical to pirate Adobe products.”

I can fully put Blizzard on that list, lol.

Reader
Khrome

Have you checked in on Chromiecraft? The open source aspect is extremely appealing and the community seems nice.

If not, i hope you weren’t deterred by a recent ‘smear campaign’ from some people who were banned from it for (repeatedly) cheating.

Reader
Bruno Brito

I played Chromiecraft for a while. I really don’t care for the “smear campaign”. I have the same issues with the server as i had before, but all in all it’s a good server.

Honestly, i just wasn’t happy with WoW at the time. That didn’t improve now.

Reader
blahlbinoa .

When I jumped on some pservers, I didn’t stay long because of how toxic people got (a surprise I’m sure for people who play WoW now and see the rampant toxicity) but the one that I found that seemed chill was Turtle WoW.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Turtle is absolutely chill and i recommend.

I also don’t recommend ANYONE to pay for anything in pservers. Even if it’s donations. I don’t EVER recommend people to pay for absolutely anything when it comes to WoW private servers.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Ashfyn Ninegold

I don’t see the slim possibility that a proliferation of rogue servers will convince ActiBlizz to behave themselves as justification for playing on a rogue server.

That aside, I’m afraid I take a far more hard line on this than others might, calling forth my Lawful Good side. Touching anything at all related to Blizzard or ActivisionBlizzardKing is simply unacceptable now that their frankly disgusting work environment and morally corrosive management has been revealed.

What went on at Blizzard was evil. Many people were permanently damaged by working there, both the women who were denigrated and the young men who were taught to be abusive. And Blizzard knew this was so and continued to do it. Doing harm intentionally is evil.

Going to a rogue server doesn’t mitigate that.

There’s nothing magical about WoW or Diablo or Starcraft or CoD. Attachment isn’t destiny. Find another game, find another set of friends.

For me, the only ethical action is to shun their products in every form.

Reader
Bruno Brito

I’m kinda on the same camp here. I can’t even look at my WoW icons for my pservers anymore. I’m considering deleting them and never touching WoW again. Been thinking on it for a while now.