face of mankind

Sunsetted in 2015.

Working As Intended: The MMOs we lost in 2015

It's become tradition to fare well the MMOs that sunsetted in the preceding year, but that wasn't always the case. At the beginning of 2015, in saying goodbye to 2014's sunsetted games, I tried to put that into perspective.

Almost exactly a year ago, I wrote about how Vanguard's early stumbles foreshadowed the changing MMORPG industry. In January 2007, when Vanguard lurched its way to launch, the genre was barely a decade old; it was booming, and it had never suffered hardship on a massive scale. In the west, we'd seen only three "major" MMOs sunset (Motor City Online, Earth and Beyond, and Asheron's Call 2), and only one MMO, Anarchy Online, had "gone F2P," though we hadn't yet thought to call it yet because it was such a rare and new thing. In fact, it wasn't until 2008's first big wave of AAA, post-World of Warcraft MMOs launched and mostly flopped that MMORPG players gave much thought to the future of the genre and how WoW had reshaped (and possibly broken) it. Maybe not even then.

In 2016 and in 2015, sunsets are increasingly common, a result of market oversaturation, business model struggles, and changing gamer tastes and investment options. Let's revisit the games we lost in 2015 and consider what their sunsets portend for the year ahead.
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Face of Mankind is shutting down in August

Sci-fi sandbox MMO Face of Mankind is calling it a career. A Nexeon spokesperson confirmed the news on the game's official forum, saying that the title is "too old to create new, meaningful content, and the visuals aren't on par with newer releases that come out on an almost daily basis."

Creator Marko Dieckmann echoed the sentiment, saying that FoM "has been running much longer than any of us hoped for," after noting that he started development work way back in 2001. Dieckmann says that development in those days wasn't the relative cakewalk that it is now thanks to free toolsets like Unity and CryEngine.

Nexeon says that it considered opening the game up to community development, but decided against it because such an action "likely wouldn't have affected the game's growth and population."

Source: Forums; Via: Game Politics

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