Das Tal’s Kickstarter fails, but development continues

Das Tal’s Kickstarter has ended without meeting its €50,000 goal, but it’s not game over for the indie PvP sandbox.

Thanking fans for the nearly €33,000 pledged in crowdfunding, Fairytale Distillery says it plans to reflect on player feedback and “restructure how [it] communicate[s] [its] game to the public” going forward:

Das Tal will continue with development. That is the simplest way to put it. The Kickstarter was never our one and only path, and we would not have kicked it off so early if we were risking everything. We plan to jump straight back into a development push that will see the game improve at a faster rate than it was even during Kickstarter, as we had basically all team members doing at least a little publicity work.

The team has set up a store on its own website to sell directly rewards and tiers akin to those from Kickstarter.

Source: Das Tal press release, Kickstarter.
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18 Comments on "Das Tal’s Kickstarter fails, but development continues"

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PrinceMark
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PrinceMark

sray155 Kickstarter is not only a way of gathering fund. Its also a great way to advertise the game, gather stats like game popularity and players willing to spend and how much they are willing to spend with the game which affects the very core of the business model itself etc.

carson63000
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carson63000

Mark Jacobs Rozyn Tridus Well, we’ve already seen some big success stories of single-player game Kickstarters deliver the goods in a massive way – Wasteland 2 and Pillars of Eternity, for instance.

But you’re right, we’re still waiting for a massively multiplayer Kickstarter project to launch and make a big impact on the genre. We’re counting on you mate. :-)

sray155
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sray155

In addition to Kickstarter game burnout, as discussed in the last thread about this, I think we’re on the verge of seeing a backlash against campaigns that basically “already have the money”: going back to the Veronica Mars campaign (I know, not a game but that’s not relevant to the point) we’ve seen projects that already backed by huge corporatios asking for our money (back to the Veronica Mars example: Warner Bros owns that IP and could have funded it for less than they were paying the cast of Two and a Half Men per episode).
These Das Tal guys are backed by Square Enix: what the hell are they doing begging for scraps on Kickstarter?

Tridus
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Tridus

playerxx Ulfbaen It also puts it in direct competition with the MOBA genre, without a PvE lure to draw other people in.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

Mark Jacobs Rozyn Tridus I agree with you but I’m not sure it’s all ks games. It really is the pvp sandbox thing. Whenever I see that now I just roll my eyes and move on. The only reason I even clicked this is because it failed and I wanted to see why.

Excluding the games that already have their funding ( like you guys ) the two game types that are going to have a real uphill battle because the market is way over saturated is MOBA and indi PVP sandbox. If a developer is just starting to make either type of game now, they are waaaay too late to the party.

Mark Jacobs
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Mark Jacobs

Rozyn Tridus I’m not sure it’s Kickstarter burnout as much as it is “KS games burnout.” It seems like a subtle difference but I do think the problem is that for a lot of people, there are already waiting on a number of games, with many of them similar in nature. So, I’m not totally convinced that it’s people being burned out on the concept of KS as opposed to already waiting on a number of games already. 

To me, burnout means that you are just tired of the whole KS thing (which I don’t think is real) but rather a combination of a number of different reasons. Like at the success of Crowfall, Castlevania, Bard’s Tale, etc. this year while last year a lot of sites and devs were singing dirges for Kickstarter funded games and the process itself.

Crowdfunding is far from dead or even dying, IMO. It’s just that people are being a bit more careful than they were before and there are just a whole lot of games in development. And when you add the higher price tiers that games such as Star Citizen, Camelot Unchained, Crowfall and other studios have added, it is not surprising if things seem to slow down a bit.

The real test for the health of crowdfunding will come (pending gov’t intervention) a few years from now when some of the biggest success stories (including us) have to deliver the goods. If the vast majority of us do that, crowdfunding will see increased interest and success stories. If we don’t, well, its future will certainly be called into question.

karmamule
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karmamule

Good luck to the devs and best wishes on future work.  Even if it’s something I don’t particularly find motivating it’s clearly a labor of love for them so I hope they meet with success down the road!

Tridus
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Tridus

CrowingOne Tridus Yeah, but if that’s the case, it would make more sense to *not* let people play it. Trying to sell a game by letting people play something that delivers a poor experience is not exactly a sound strategy.

Tridus
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Tridus

CrowingOne Wow, that sounds like such a train wreck.

Rozyn
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Rozyn

Tridus Rozyn Oh I completely agree with you, which is why while “KickStarter burnout” is a valid reason behind people not funding a game, it’s not the only reason. If it’s a game people want badly enough, it’ll get funded. It does seem like the already small – in comparison to gaming in general – MMO crowd is pretty much burned out, but the larger gaming crowd still has money to burn.

Tridus
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Tridus

Rozyn The difference is that Bloodstained is in a genre that is starved for good games, from someone known to be able to make those kind of games. It’s kind of like Star Citizen and Elite: Dangerous in that way. People flocked to it because if you want old school Castlevania style gameplay, where do you get it?

PVP Sandbox MMOs on the other hand are a dime a dozen these days. Yet another one of those, from a studio that isn’t well known is going to be a tough sell. Consider how much of the MMO market is primarily interested in PvP and tunes out the second you say “PvP sandbox”. 

I mean, I might fund an MMO, but this game screams gankbox and I despise ganking. I’m far from alone. That means they’re stuck chasing dollars from a limited and already well served market segment.

Ulfbaen
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Ulfbaen

playerxx Ulfbaen  Yeah, I meant to say “I get that there is a market for them” and I know it keeps the game going without the need for constant updates, but I am a giant wuss/care bear and I just want to farm phat loot and group with friends dungeon crawling.

I by no means want them to stop making these games for those that enjoy them, I just wish there were more that didn’t focus solely on PVP.

MesaSage
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MesaSage

Rozyn  I was thinking the same thing looking at the top 10 on kicktraq.  Umbra and Bard’s Tale are raking it in.

playerxx
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playerxx

Ulfbaen There is a market for them and PVP also removes the need of any or much PVE content. Players entertain themselves.

Ulfbaen
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Ulfbaen

I for one am tired of all the PVP focused KS games… I get their is a market for them, but we have been SWAMPED by PVP focused game of late. I want an old school EQ esque game to come.

Rozyn
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Rozyn

It was kind of interesting seeing the discussion about KS burnout in the last article on this (which I do believe is real) and then that Castlevania-type game was at $4.5mil last night. If you put a general video game up that people want, they can still rake in the cash. MMOs seem to have such a hard time though, unless it has zombie survival lol.

BalsBigBrother
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BalsBigBrother

This kickstarter never really did seem to hit that critical mass that most succesful ones seem to at the start and it was always struggling from the get go.  Hope the devs are able to continue as they seem to be saying they can and can create their game for the people who were on board for it, good luck :-)

MesaSage
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MesaSage

I hope they reflect on who[s] going [to] edit [the] blog posts going forward.

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