eleven giants

See: Glitch and Eleven

Global Chat: The MMO expansion lifecycle

With the ever-developing, ever-growing nature of MMORPGs, the expansion truly has a life of its own. By now we are well acquainted with the cycle that runs from gestation to obsolescence and can usually point to where any particular expansion is on this chart.

The Lazy Goldmaker outlined the typical progression of MMO expansion packs with a six-step cycle that focuses heavily on the economy and raiding: “After the final raid of the expansion we will enter the last content drought. This is typically the longest period with nothing exciting added to the game. We are in the middle of this phase of Legion currently. Most of the markets from the live expansion will still be viable, but profit margins will be decreasing, as will prices on all goods.”

Read on for more MMO blog essays, including ones that cover EVE Online, Wizard101, SWTOR, and LOTRO!

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Glitch-inspired Children of Ur abandons Google Chrome due to incompatibility

The uphill struggle to rebuild Glitch has hit a rather significant snag in Children of Ur.

“It saddens us to bring you this news, but Children of Ur is no longer working in Google Chrome, our browser of choice,” the team said on Facebook. “This is because Chrome is no longer supporting a feature that Polymer (which we heavily rely on) uses. CoU will not run on Chrome for the indefinite future, as resources are very limited. From this point on, Mozilla Firefox is the browser to use in order to play CoU. Unfortunately, the game is very choppy and somewhat slow in their browser.”

This notice was the first development post about the game since May 2017. Children of Ur is one of two indie community projects that have been attempting to bring back Glitch in some way, shape, or form, the other one being Eleven.

Source: Facebook. Thanks Xanward!

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Eleven boots up a Glitch wiki to crowdsource info

As Glitch fan remake Eleven reemerges on the scene with more alpha developments, the team has a plea that it is making to the community: Help us remember all of the details of Glitch before they are forgotten forever.

The team said that accessible information sources such as the old strategy wiki and a port of the old game are “erratic” in details and that it needs more accurate info to help recreate the game. Thus, the team has started up the Glitch Forever Wiki and has asked the community to aid in fleshing out all of the missing links.

“This is the alpha version. Many pages are still outdated. A lot of details from the end of Glitch — new recipes especially — are missing,” the team said. “But it’s here, and it’s ours, and we can fill in the gaps and add pages for all the post-Glitch activities and Glitch revival projects. Join us.”

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Eleven resurfaces with an update on its Glitch remake

After over a year of silence, the volunteer team behind one of Glitch’s remakes has emerged for an update. Eleven’s team let the community know that while it hadn’t given up on resurrecting Tiny Speck’s unique MMO, it has been slow going.

“We’re still hard at work on this, but the current focus of development effort involves a bunch of server-side reliability and data consistency work which isn’t particularly shiny or fun to write about,” the team said. “Other eventual work involves recreating the locations (190 or so) that weren’t in the Tiny Speck asset release and figuring out the future of the client.”

Eleven’s team encouraged fans to hang out on the alpha forums for more up-to-date information and project announcements. Meanwhile, fellow Glitch reboot Children of Ur has been quiet ever since its last blog post back in May.

Source: Eleven

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The Game Archaeologist: Where are all of the open-source MMOs?

Recently we had an interesting question come in from reader and Patron Rasmus Praestholm, who asked me to do a little investigating: “What (if anything of substance) exists in the MMO field that’s not only free, but open source? The topic of open source came up briefly in a recent column, where Ryzom was noted to have gone open source at some point. But have any serious efforts actually gotten anywhere starting out as open source?”

As some graphical MMORPGs pass the two-decade mark in video game history and are being either cancelled or retired to maintenance mode, it’s an increasingly important topic when it comes to keeping these games alive. Not only that, the question of open source MMOs involves the community in continued development, with the studio handing over the keys to an aging car to see what can be done by resourceful fans.

But has anything much been done with open source projects in the realm of MMORPGs? Is this something that we should be demanding more of as online gaming starts using more accessible platforms such as SpatialOS? Let’s dig a bit into this topic and see what we turn up.

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Perfect Ten: MMORPGs that died too soon

Your favorite game is going to die. I wrote about that. Some games are never even going to get to launching in the first place, unfortunately. But then there are these titles: games that went the distance when it came to development, marketing, promotion, testing… but somehow didn’t quite manage to stick the landing past that. These are the games that, in Transformers terms, are the hi-then-die cast of the MMO space.

That doesn’t always mean the games are bad, mind you. Some of these games were great fun. But through a combination of business model issues, publisher issues, player population, and just general weirdness, these titles couldn’t make it to a year and a half in the wild. Heck, some of them couldn’t even make it to a year and a quarter. And if you want to peruse this list and wonder why all of these titles are gone but Alganon is somehow still operating… well, we’re just as confused as you are.

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Massively OP’s guide to the best upcoming indie MMORPGs, part two

Last week, we introduced the first part of our guide to the best upcoming, in-development indie MMORPGs — yes, the list was so long that we had to split it lest our CMS explode! So this week we’re back with the other half of our list, a quick and dirty guide to many of the indie MMORPGs in development and some of the key points about each. Hint: We’re not asking whether they are a sandbox with open world PvP because of course they are. As a side note, we won’t be covering most of the survival sandbox and mere multiplayer titles, as that would be too great for the scope of this guide. And if you’re interested in these games, then you’ll definitely want to track our Make My MMO and Betawatch columns.

On with part two!

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Here’s what’s going on with Glitch’s successors

We are fast approaching the late, lamented Glitch’s birthday on September 27th, and to mark the occasion, we thought we would check in with the progress of both of the game’s community reboot projects.

Over in Children of Ur, the team released its “Cuteness Update” earlier this month. Players can witness cubimal racing in the streets, enjoy a bag for music boxes, and stay in touch with others thanks to the new friends list.

Meanwhile, Eleven continues with its extremely small alpha, although the devs are hosting a drawing to pull out additional testers (you’ll need to enter before next Monday if you’re interested!). The project’s lead developer also recently posted a roundup of AMA questions and answers.

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Massively OP’s guide to the best upcoming indie MMORPGs, part one

When you write for an MMORPG website that covers literally hundreds of games and could probably add in hundreds more that are extinct, are in operation only overseas, or are so incredibly niche that their creators’ moms don’t even know about them, you start devoting a large portion of your brain to trying to keep details about all of these games straight. This not only results in forgetting two of your kids’ names (after all, space is limited), but it’s nearly an impossible task. There’s just too much out there.

And lately I’ve noticed that the staff and readers alike have started to become incredibly confused regarding all of the indie MMOs that are oozing through the development process in their 72 planned testing stages (the other week I could swear that I saw a game declare itself to be going into “state semi-regionals”). There are too many games, some of which look far too similar, and it’s stressing us out.

Enhance your calm, citizen. Here’s the first part of our quick and dirty guide to many of the indie MMORPGs in development and some of the key points about each. Hint: It’s not asking whether they are a sandbox with open world PvP because of course they are. As a side note, I won’t be covering most of the survival sandbox and mere multiplayer titles, as that would be too great for the scope of this guide. And if you’re interested in these games, then you’ll definitely want to track our Make My MMO and Betawatch columns. Then stay tuned next week for the second half of this list!

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The Daily Grind: What’s your favorite World of Warcraft memory?

Eleven years is a long time to cast one’s recollection lines back into the memory pool, but several moments from the initial launch of World of Warcraft remain firmly embedded in my mind. I’ll always remember the chaos of those initial weeks, my first steps as a Dwarf Hunter, and the joy that this game I’d been anticipating for three years was finally here.

Over the next four years, I would rack up a lot of terrific memories from the game. I’ll always be fond of my guildmates and their antics. I won’t forget how questing used to be before the hub system came into vogue. I’ll always laugh at that time that a friend put me on auto-follow and I jumped off a cliff and instantly transformed my Druid into her flying form.

So what is your favorite World of Warcraft memory from the past 11 years?

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How Eleven is bringing Glitch’s groove back

When Glitch was canceled, it crushed the hearts and dreams of those few who knew, understood, and loved the game. Since its downfall, the quirky browser game has grown a cult following and even (tiny) sparked two attempted revivals. Today we’re talking with Kaiyon Alatar on how Eleven will bring back Glitch’s world — just perhaps in a new way.

Join us after the jump as we talk with Alatar about Eleven’s progress, how it differs from Children of Ur, and what you can do to help!

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The MOP Up: Rick & Morty meet MOBAs

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. See any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we’ll see a bizarre MOBA/adult cartoon crossover, a special character that you can only play for two months, a sexism-free MMO, and more videos than you can shake a stick at (provided that your stick-shaking capabilities are limited to five).

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Children of Ur knocks out Alpha 1.1 update

Children of Ur, one of two main Glitch revival spin-offs, hit another milestone recently with its alpha 1.1 update.

With the new patch for the browser-based title, testers will encounter many more NPCs and have an easier time navigating the world thanks to GPS directions and teleports. The UI has been tweaked as well, with new options such as colorful emoticons. There are many other small additions, such as dev name tags and salmen (Glitch spelling) trying to swim without water.

The Children of Ur project started up back in December 2013 after Glitch’s shutdown and subsequent release of its art assets. One other Glitch spin-off, Eleven, is also attempting to emulate the spirit and style of the original game and is also in early testing.

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