pixelmage games

John Smedley’s company, responsible for Hero’s Song.

Make My MMO: Smed's new studio, Camelot's beta, and Elite's Holo-Me (February 18, 2017)

This week in MMO crowdfunding, we did a retrospective on why crowdfunded MMOARPG Hero's Song failed. It's almost as if Justin knew (cue spooky music) because two days later, Hero's Song's John Smedley and most of the Pixelmage team showed up at Amazon, announcing a new studio and a new game for the shopping giant's games division. In other words, don't expect Smed back on Kickstarter any time soon.

Meanwhile, Star Citizen's alpha 2.6.1 went live, we poked around TUG's status, Elite Dangerous demoed its upcoming "Holo-Me" character creator, The Exiled prepped for next week's launch, Ruin of the Reckless entered its backer test phase, and Camelot Unchained hinted at beta.

Read on for more on what's up with MMO crowdfunding over the last few weeks and the regular roundup of all the crowdfunded MMOs we've got our eye on.

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Smed's new Amazon studio is basically Pixelmage Games

Amazon Game Studios announced yesterday that it had picked up MMORPG genre veteran John Smedley to helm one of its up-and-coming online game studios. Today, it published a blog post with a photograph of the team, which appears to show that Smed brought along with him several familiar faces from Pixelmage Games. Well, more than several -- it looks like the bulk of the team, minus some of the artists and AI expert Dave Mark.

Shown in the photograph is Smed (hiding in the back!), along with Scott Maxwell, Steve Freitas, Andy Skirvin minus a beard (nice try, Skirvin, but we're canny), Michael Hunley, Jay Beard, Bill Trost, Toby Brousil (pretty sure), Matt McDonald, Jim Buck, Steve George, Paul Carrico, and Michelle Butler. Which is almost all of 'em. No need to worry about whether those guys landed on their feet after their studio folded seven weeks ago-- Smed's new Amazon studio is basically Pixelmage Games, though to be fair, we don't know what its name is or the particulars of the game it's working on.

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Perfect Ten: Terminology the MMORPG genre needs

MMOs, like any other hobby, have their own terminology. We have the term "newb" for new players, "noob" for players who aren't actually new but still make new player mistakes, and "n00b" if you want to sound like an insufferable weirdo from the aughts. But we also have a lot of terminology that just plain doesn't work any more for a variety of reasons, like "pay-to-win" and "hardcore" and so forth.

That does not, however, mean that we do not need our specialized terminology. Indeed, while some of our older vocabulary is not up to the tasks of modern games, I think a great deal could be accomplished just by adding some new words to our lexicon. So let's create some brand-new terms (or codify existing ones) so that we can, in fact, have shared words to describe scenarios that we encounter on a regular basis.

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Amazon Game Studios gave John Smedley a new online game team to run

If you wondered what John Smedley was up to following the death of Pixelmage Games and Hero's Song in December, now you have an answer: Amazon Game Studios picked him up to run a sub-studio in San Diego.

"We’re excited to announce an all-new Amazon Games Studio based in San Diego and led by industry veteran John Smedley," says a PR blast from AGS today. "John’s pioneering work helped define the modern MMO, and his influence can be felt in thousands of games that followed. He helped create the blueprint for fusing massive game worlds with vibrant player communities, a vision that we share at Amazon Game Studios. That’s why we’re excited to announce that John has joined Amazon Games Studios to lead an all-new team in San Diego."

Apparently, Smed and his team are "already hard at work on an ambitious new project that taps into the power of the AWS Cloud and Twitch to connect players around the globe in a thrilling new game world."

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Five reasons behind the failure of Hero's Song

In July of 2015, MMORPG fans were stunned to hear that John Smedley was stepping down from his post as president of Daybreak. After all, he had been in the captain's chair at Verant, SOE, and now Daybreak for nearly two decades, helming the company as it handled some of the most influential MMOs of the early generation, including EverQuest and Star Wars Galaxies. Fans were curious to know both what happened and what Smedley was planning to do next.

They didn't have to wait long for the latter. A month later, Smedley announced that he was starting up his own studio to work on a new game. Using his industry contacts and years of experience in game development, Smedley pulled together a solid team to craft Hero's Song, an online fantasy survival game that would provide huge, customizable worlds. The team went into a flurry of activity, putting out dev blogs, holding fundraisers, and pushing early access out the door.

Yet by the end of 2016, the project was dead, refunds were being distributed to backers, and Smedley's studio was dissolved. So what happened? Why did Hero's Song fail when it had so much going for it? Now that a couple of months have passed, it might be time to step back and perform a post-mortem on this fascinating and doomed game. I posit that there are five key reasons why we're not right now playing Hero's Song and anticipating its official launch by the end of the year. Hindsight is 20-20, after all, so what could Smedley have done different?

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Massively OP Podcast Episode 103: Back to Morrowind

We apologize in advance. The news of the return of Bree's most favorite Elder Scrolls setting has jacked up her excitement levels to 11. Be warned that this episode may contain any and all of the following: gleeful giggling, spontaneous singing, half-hour recollections of the old days, readings of player-written poetry, and confetti thrown through your computer speakers.

It’s the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you’d like to send in your own letter to the show, use the “Tips” button in the top-right corner of the site to do so.

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The Daily Grind: How often do you claim refunds on MMOs?

Chargebacks were a big deal in 2016: Black Desert, ArcheAge, and No Man Sky were all embroiled in community drama thanks to perceived chargeback abuse. PayPal even ended its chargeback protection for crowdfunding donations, making it harder for gamers who hand over cash to abuse the credit card system to get that money back.

But some games are offering you your money back and you're still not taking it.

Hero's Song, for example, recently went under, but John Smedley pledged to refund any Steam and Indiegogo purchasers who asked for their money returned. Yet there are folks in our comments who said they wouldn't take him up on that -- they feel they got their money's worth or don't feel it's right to take back what was intended as a gift, risks fully understood. That reminded me of when Glitch sunsetted after a couple years in operation and Stewart Butterfield offered everyone all of their money back from years of play and a lot of players said no way.

How about you? Do you claim refunds on games when available? How often do you do it?

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MMO Year in Review: Turbine gave the ring to the eagles (December 2016)

This year, we’re taking a time-machine back through our MMO coverage, month by month, to hit the highlights and frame our journey before we head into 2017.

Ah, December: The month of endless annual awards... and end-year studio catastrophes. This round, all eyes were on venerable MMO studio Turbine as it announced it had spun out a new indie studio to take over Lord of the Rings Online and Dungeons and Dragons Online, as published by none other than Daybreak. Lost in the shuffle? The Asheron's Call franchise, which will sunset in January 2017.

Meanwhile, gamers paid tribute to Carrie Fisher, Hero's Song went belly up, Star Citizen launched Star Marine, Elder Scrolls Online teased housing, and Nostalrius relaunched.

And we rolled out our annual MMORPG awards, plus our blooper awards, weirdest stories, and other meta roundups.

Read on for the whole list!

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The best Massively OP streams of 2016

The number of games our wee little Stream Team covers in the span of a year is staggering. If you ever wanted to know what an MMORPG looks like and how it plays before you shell out money or download a mega-client, the Stream Team is your best bet.

We’ve put together some of our favorite streams from the year, from launches to first-looks and beta deep-dives and even a series of SMITE charity streams we did with the help of our viewers. Enjoy!

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The Daily Grind: Will you Kickstart any video games in 2017?

I backed only one Kickstarter in 2016: Hero's Song, which you'll recall didn't fund. While I'm generally suspicious of Kickstarter and have regretted a couple of my donations, I can't rightfully say it's a bad thing since it's one of the big reasons I'm saying this on the site Kickstarter donors built. And I didn't back more this past year mainly because not much caught my eye -- not because I'm against the idea in general. I still think the platform can work, as long as we look out for the abuses.

But I know a lot of you are way more hardline about crowdfunding than I am, so I'd like to hear your thoughts. Do you plan on Kickstarting any video games in 2017? What about MMOs or non-gaming projects? What are your personal rules for engaging in a campaign?

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Hero's Song wants you to take your money back

As Hero's Song transitions into Hero's Swan Song following this week's announcement of the game and studio shutdown, John Smedley and Pixelmage Games are encouraging backers to take advantage of the open refund policy.

The studio said that it will start processing refunds early next week and give players their money back via check or PayPal. Due to Pixelmage shutting down, the studio would like backers to file sooner rather than later. The last date you will be able to do this is on March 31st, 2017.

John Smedley told fans not to be bashful and refuse the refund: "I've seen a lot of emails saying, 'Keep my money, thank you for your hard work.' You have no idea how good that makes us feel, but we actually feel the opposite. PLEASE TAKE YOUR MONEY BACK. We took your money in good faith and it is with that same good faith that we want to give it back to you."

Source: Indiegogo

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Smed has canceled Hero's Song, offers everyone refunds

Pixelmage Games, the indie studio headed up by MMO veteran John Smedley, announced today that it is folding up, which means Hero's Song is coming to an end.

"It's with a heavy heart that I have to report that Pixelmage Games is going to be shutting down and we have ceased development on Hero's Song. For the last year, our team has worked tirelessly to make the game we've dreamed about making, and with your support, and the support of our investors, we were able to get the game into Early Access. Unfortunately sales fell short of what we needed to continue development. We knew going in that most startups don't make it, and as an indie game studio we hoped we would be the exception to that rule, but as it turned out we weren't."

Notably, the team says that anyone who purchased the game is entitled to claim a refund -- through Steam the old-fashioned way or by email if you're an Indiegogo contributor.

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