The Daily Grind: How much of your MMORPG play amounts to ‘work’?

The latest SMBC comic is going to have my fellow MMO fans nodding enthusiastically: In response to the first man, who says we need to find the “next big thing” after gamifying work, a second man suggests workifying games — something the author dryly remarks was obviously the catalyst for the first MMORPG.

And I’m not sure he’s wrong at all. A tremendous amount of my MMO gameplay consists of activities I suspect an objective observer would classify as work rather than a game. Unpaid work. The only real difference is that some of it is work I enjoy — like crafting in a sandbox with an immersive and rewarding economy. Quest hubs, though? I’m over that.

How much of your MMORPG play amounts to “work”? Has that changed since you first began playing MMOs?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

75 Comments on "The Daily Grind: How much of your MMORPG play amounts to ‘work’?"

Subscribe to:
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most liked
Reader
Orenj

The biggest turn-off type of game work for me is meta-play which is entirely a product of arbitrary restrictions the developers have made for purposes outside the game world.

Bank inventory management should not be a thing–I should be able to hoard piles of stuff in my housing to the point that even Smaug would be impressed. Heck, you should be able to pile stuff up anywhere in the world, obviously with the concern that somebody might come along and help themselves. Also personal inventory management in games that artificially restrict that as a monetization scheme, although I’m more accepting of ultimate weight and volume restrictions because encumbrance is real.

My brother loved farming in AA, but quit BDO after not very long because having to be constantly online, and constantly maintaining crops, felt too much like a job for him.

In BDO, having to constantly juggle CP spend between different things because of the artificially reduced return past 255 was a *huge* one for me. This also ties into the previous item because of restricted farming plots vs AA’s plant almost anywhere; you have to go do some other “work” to get CP for fences just to be able to plant crops.

Having to pick & choose just a few abilities to use at a time in games that limit the number of hotbar slots you have. Deckbuilding is such an artificial gamey activity; it has no place in any open world.

Reader
Slaasher

None of it. If it feels like work then I stop playing that game.

Reader
Zen Dadaist

Increasingly, far too sodding much between Dailies and Inventory management, particularly in a game I have become established in and therefore have many characters. It’s getting tiresome. More play less maintenence wanted.

Reader
Morenito

At the end, depending on what you’re doing, playing EVE Online felt like work. The work was fun, but the amount of time & planning that the game required I was no longer able (willing?) to devote to it.

I’ve found that, as I’ve gotten older, where in my younger games I’d actually *gasp* schedule RL around gaming, now it’s WAAAAYYY vice versa; I end up squeezing some gaming in when I can. I would LOVE to be able to just farm or make stuff or shoot things in the face whenever I wanted to, which back then was morning, noon & night on weekends, again, but now, alas, adulting has taken over.

I/we always said that if we ever retired & the game was still running, we’d go back to EVE, but that brings up another somewhat-related point: I do NOT want to be stressed-out while playing games any more. RL, especially my work, is incredibly stressful, so before, where I’d see out thrills & chills via PvP & super-hard challenges, now I play games more to unwind; I’m MORE than happy to just gather, craft, farm for a bit, just chill out.

Usually when the game is really REALLY enjoyable & engrossing to me AND I have some type of goal that I’m trying to achieve, even mundane repetitive tasks don’t feel like drudgery.

But if/when I achieve that goal, like in CoH when I wanted to hit the Influence Cap & had every L50 IO’d-out toon that I wanted, or in EVE when I had every ship I wanted to fly & enough isk to buy them all over again multiple times if I lost them, & in BDO when I had/was making so much cash that continuing t ocraft & sell/farm anything was essentially pointless, I get bored & inevitably leave.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Ocho

When a game starts to feel more like a grind than fun, that’s when I generally move on. However, this pattern I’ve found has led to me being pretty terrible at MMOs. Hit max level and it’s time for incremental gains by repetitive content? Meh. Even sometimes the slog of *getting* to max level if the content isn’t exciting enough. And side stuff? Like the economy or crafting? Forget it. Crafting is only useful at those top echelons where that repetitive content is, and the only items worthwhile to sell at auction usually reside there, too. It’s almost like I’m the anti-Bree.

However, a game I’ve played brings back some new content or continues their story? Well, that’s a whole other thing. I’ll gladly come back for that… that doesn’t feel like work, though.

django857
Reader
django857

There have been only two mmo’s where i enjoyed crafting. Earth & Beyond and EQ2. In E&B i specialized in making beam weapons. I could make QL 200% just about every beam weapon in that game and it took a long time to learn them. But i was known on my server for it and it became like a job making beams all the time for players..

In EQ2 i always take carpenter as my profession because i love making furniture for my houses. Crafting in other mmos i just never got into because i would have a need to become the best which would turn the game into a job for me.

Reader
Robert Mann

Crafting in most MMOs doesn’t offer anything like those experiences… because it’s everyone doing a side task that offers nearly nothing once one is at max level and running dungeons in eye-bleeding easy PUG mode. XD

Reader
steve

I think all of it fits the literal definition of work: exertion or effort directed to produce or accomplish something.

That may seem pedantic, but most of what we do in MMOs has marketable value, at least in the black market in the form of leveling services and the sale of characters, equipment and in-game currency. You don’t even need to “workify” elements of a game, though there’s a lot of untapped potential in that regard as well.

People have been making a meager living out of it for years, and others have made small fortunes. Once upon a time I was a report analyst/database tech for a leading-brand online payment processor and was often called upon to pull reports for fraud investigations related to MMOs and MMO-guild websites, and I was just as often stunned to see how much money was being made by certain groups and individual players through the sale of characters, items and even raid dungeon runs where the client was guaranteed certain drops. There were guilds that had amassed seven-figure account balances from their “work” in-game.

In response to the title question, I’ve never tried to market my own gameplay and I don’t work at being on the competitive edge of things anymore, so I’d say my time in MMOs is pure recreation, escape and socializing. I’ve never felt like playing an MMO was a job, though I’d certainly be open to it if it could be done above-board.

Reader
Robert Mann

If it is a themepark, and I’m at endgame and not just casually poking at the story to see if it is worth reading (or if I’m leveling an alt to play a role that is needed in a game for a group) and I’m not running something with friends as a group, then it is likely work. If I’m in a sandbox, it is always work… but I’m playing with people and talking, so it is also always fun.

Long story short, almost all of it is work, but when playing with good people it is the kind of work where the hours fly by, and you aren’t focusing on the work but on the fun being had. *I’m always amazed at the idea the game has to provide in game rewards in the WoW trend to succeed, because that’s really not what the genre is about to me.*

Reader
Alex Malone

I would say the leveling process is 95% work, 5% fun.

Once I reach endgame, it’s probably 80-90% fun, 10-20% work. PvP is always fun and I spend a significant portion of my endgame time pvping, but I also enjoy dungeons and raiding in groups and that is always fun too. The only work I have to do at endgame is the occasional grinding for mats/gold in order to repair gear and replace pots and the occasional grinding for other bits and bobs (like grinding xp in lotro to level up legendary weapons).

Luckily for me, I only have to level up once, so that (typically) 4-7 days /played is a one-off hurdle I have to overcome to reach the content I enjoy, so the longer I play a game, the better the fun-to-work ratio overall.

Reader
thirtymil

I’m the opposite – levelling is 95% fun for me, endgame is 95% work. So I usually only gear up to a certain level, call it done, and then play an alt instead.

capt_north
Reader
capt_north

The pure pwning power of patience and persistence is severely undervalued. If and when you make it over to the next spiral arm, you’ll find those stars already have my name on them. I win.

I feel that any well-designed virtual world will have some tasks that are impossible for the average person to complete, just because the average person has the attention span of a gnat. If people are whining that they can’t build a Demon Sword of Ultimate Annihilation without a solid year of focused gameplay doing little else but crafting… ah-hah, I’ve found my place in that world. Don’t nerf it. Give the whiners other forms of instant gratification, and leave me to my work.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

The issue with that way of thinking is that, given the choice, too many of the people that can’t build a Demon Sword of Ultimate Annihilation will, instead, move to a different game where they can. So, nothing against that way of thinking or games that are designed like that, but you must be aware that doubling down on that philosophy will likely result in fewer of the casual players remaining in the game and, thus, a smaller budget to continue developing it.

Reader
steve

That’s a good point, and no-doubt has had considerable influence on MMO design over the years.

I’ve always been a proponent of being inclusive with MMO design, but I also feel that there’s a balance to be had. It’s not healthy if hardcore raiders are the gatekeepers for your best content, but neither is it healthy to exclude challenge and competition to the point where everyone gets a participation trophy.

Reader
Robert Mann

True, but I’d rather have a smaller budget game that actually fits me than a large budget game that follows all the same trends and does nothing for me beyond serve as a space to run around in while talking to friends on VOIP.

*Not that I want a themepark with the only changes being a long grind to make items, because that is not what I am looking for!*

Reader
adri

I consider everything “work” which includes things I don’t want to do but I have to do because of some specific reasons. I have to grind those NPCs so I can finally craft this item/get an important achievement which provides me some inportant stats/I get XP to level up a skill etc.
I do them and when I include an Excelsheet they end up being quite fun but they are still work. At my real workplace I also have To-Do-Lists so that’s kinda the same.
It’s like “I don’t want to do the laundry but I have to because I’m an adult and if I don’t do this I will have no boxershorts” so I end up doing the laundry or grinding those achievements because my adult-brain told me it’s useful to have +5 strenght and a fresh pair of socks.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Modrain

Objectively, anything can be defined as being the activity of working. But the “work” used here isn’t a mechanic or an activity, it’s a feeling based around one’s experience of the activity of working.

Video games are built by fine tuning the enjoyment to frustration ratio of many mechanics.
Similarly, you could summarize “work”, as an enjoyment to frustration ratio, though in this case it’s not fine tuned at all, but something you have to deal with. Admittedly, it’s more often distorted towards frustration than enjoyment for many people (because lack of interest, poor salary, motivation, hierarchy, obligation, etc).

The statement that MMOs are, or contains “work”, is the projection of a feeling that is mostly subjective, when it does not refer to the global perception of “work” as not being enjoyable.

All of that to say that to answer the question, it’s necessary to also say how one feel about work, granted you adhere to the comparison work – MMO. Which I don’t, because it’s too subjective. But MMOs are 40% potato, 50% chocolate and 10% mushroom.

Reader
Robert Mann

I’ve never tried chocolate potatoes with mushroom, so that’s a little odd as an analogy to me! :P

Reader
Patreon Donor
Schlag Sweetleaf

.

THIS IS FUN I AM HAVING FUN.gif
Reader
Shiro Madoushi

This picture captured my time in archeage so well.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

“you have the spirit to fight back, but the good sense to control it. Your eyes are full of hate, Forty-One. That’s good. Hate keeps a man alive, it gives him strength. Now listen up! All of you! We keep you alive to serve this ship. Row well, and Live!”

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Nordavind

If I am able do it IRL, I don’t want to do it in game. More or less.

Anyway, football is paid work and you can play it in a game. Same goes for driving a car. So I don’t think this was how (only) MMO’s were made. It was how many games were made.

Reader
Sally Bowls

To say something different: isn’t this because of the Real Gamers like at this site?

The thesis is most of those reviled casuals don’t really care if some of the other billion players of Grumpy Birds Mobile have an easy time of it. But if I can get great gear in a PC MMO by doing something fun and easy, then Real MMO Gamers will brand this an Abomination unto the Lord. Risk vs Reward; making something for one precent of the customers is called “aspirational,” yada yada

These MMO Players are driving MMOs to be about making somewhat unpleasant tasks, If the task is too unpleasant, it is a waste since not enough people will do it. If the tasks are fun, everyone will do it, so obviously one can’t give all the customers the rewards, gear, titles and fun. Real Gamers enjoy something more if it is denied to other people.

Ergo, you have to work for the rewards.

Reader
steve

I don’t know if I’d go so far as to say real gamers enjoy something if it is denied to other people.
Rather, rewards are more meaningful when they are tied to a skill gradient. This leads to scarcity and that adds value.

There’s no doubt that some see this as a zero-sum game and will try to block access to others (We saw this a lot in EQ raiding), but I think that’s a small subset of MMO players. Most people don’t care if others have the same items, so long as they met the same challenge to get it.

Reader
Sally Bowls

I get that a lot of people say that.

But “skill gradient” and “scarcity adds value” is just a politer way of saying that it is not the accomplishment but that other people don’t have it. What if you spend 200 hours on pve, raid, pvp progression and I go to a NPC and get the same gear? If you are doing it for the personal challenge and enjoyment, you won’t mind it I get it a different way. 99.999% of the gamers would have a fit at this “injustice.” Unfortunately.

Reader
Robert Mann

Aye, I just want some variety for crying out loud! Outside outfits, I know that if I’m playing this themepark I’m using the same weapon, armor, and other gear as every other player who has bothered with the same content and gotten drops. I’ve seen the exact same story. It’s kinda boring that way.

For any themepark, I’d much rather be able to build a character with basic weapons and armor, and differentiate myself via choices and a deeper story without the whole gearing issue being involved. It just isn’t how MMOs have been being made.

Working for the rewards is all fine and dandy for some rewards… but if the rewards are gear then I just don’t care at this point. Everyone with x hours to spend has that gear. It doesn’t matter at all. No amount of fancy mount graphics will impress, no oversized weapon or shoulderpads will make me feel awesome. No, I’m very much looking for a different standard here, and it is why MMOs just don’t really feel inspired to me.

I still play, but it is for the people I play with and enjoy talking to, rather than the cruddy rewards that the game throws at me.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

Reminds me of how I like uniqueness in characters but dislike exclusivity. I want my characters to be unique due to being able to make unique and viable choices when presented with the same options everyone else has; on the other hand, if my character is unique because other players are prevented from picking the same choices I did, that has no interest or value for me.

It’s part of the reason I do some light crafting in the real world. Anyone could learn to craft and create items and accessories identical to the ones I’ve made, but no one did, which is what makes them valuable for me.

Reader
steve

I feel the same. I stepped off the gear treadmill years ago and now I’m usually content with whatever gear is sufficient to my casual playstyle.

I will say that ARK’s breeding and crafting mechanics got me re-invested in working for stats and unique visuals (And ARK breeding/imprinting is work of the sort I haven’t done since the bad old days of EQ). So I can’t say I’m entirely unmotivated.

Reader
Van

I often times like things that appear to be work. With work comes personal reward and satisfaction.

Also a big appeal of MMORGP’s is that they are not all about combat. There are lots of things to do socially, economically ect.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

99% of us here have a different perspective than people who aren’t familiar with MMOs. I’m teaching a buddy of mine to play LOTRO and it is not only his first MMO, he is not much of a gamer past the arcade days where you plunked down a quarter.
I am having to walk my thought process way, WAY back with him and having to explain the UI in great detail, concepts, goals, it has become MMOs 101 pretty much for him. LOTRO is a good title to learn from, but I’m having to really go basic with him to explain things like, “see those red roses? they have a bit of sparklies coming off because you’re supposed to go over there and right-click them to satisfy the quest goals..” etc. etc.

More on topic: When I began to discuss crafting, gathering, mining, farming, the other things to do in the game I believe he was a little overwhelmed. I had to just say, “MMOs are extremely complex games designed to last you years of gameplay”…

What we take for granted in these games can blow the mind of an uninitiated new player. I’m sure that seems like an incredible amount of work for someone used to gobbling up ghosts in Pac Man.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

My partner was pretty overwhelmed by RIFT and TSW, for sure, and he’s had previous gaming experience through the 80s-00s and did do a little bit of MMO with Maplestory. I think he’s better now after a little experience and getting a little bit into endgame of Diablo 3 and openworldy of Xenoblade and Zelda.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Pandalulz

I enjoy the combat leveling questing grind, and I like the crafting grind, and so those don’t really feel like work. When the game starts telling me that I have to do something I don’t like, in order to do something I do like, that’s when I move on.

Reader
kidwithknife

Zero. I play games to have fun, if I want to work more I’ll get a second job and get paid for it.

Reader
life_isnt_just_dank_memes

idk. one of the things i’ve always appreciated about mmos is that most people who play them don’t get how markets work and that makes it real easy to make money in game once you have a bit of capital. after that you dont really have to think about it much.

Reader
thirtymil

I think it’s not so much a case of not understanding how markets work, but more a case of not wanting to spend escapism time in a fantasy MMO playing the stock market.

deekay_plus
Reader
deekay_plus

you reminded me on archeage fs server people constantly trying to get people to sell them apex for substantially less gold than the AH, which posting to AH at lowest price being fairly higher than the trade chat rate would sell within a few minutes with less hassle (and no AH tax like other items).

it was prettty amusing that apparently people would not only sell them at their lower requested rate with bigger hassle, at least one or two of the people requesting the lower prices were stockpiling them to game the APEX market on the AH amongst other market manipulations.

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

You’re that person who was always making it hard for me to find Luck Charms for a decent price in City of Heroes.

/e shakes fist angrily.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

About whether in-game activities are work: it’s subjective. Different people enjoy different things; some of the things I do purely for fun would be considered work by others, and some things I’ve seen done for fun by others are things that feel like work for me.

As for whether I do things in-game that I consider work: typically no. I might do some of it in small doses to unlock progression, key words here being “small doses”, but that is it; if I ever get to a point where more than a token amount of my gameplay feels like work I will leave the game, either temporarily or permanently.

Reader
Armsbend

It used to be a lot. Then I said I’d never do that again so my real life doesn’t suffer too much. So if I’m farming mats or whatever it’s only to chatwhore my in game friends or listen to a new album or whatever.

If the game ever becomes a job I stop playing it so I can spend that time attempting to make my real life better.

Reader
Loopy

One person’s work is another person’s pleasure. What i consider work (crafting, grinding, dailies) is something that plenty of people enjoy doing. But my idea of fun (quests) is somebody’s idea of a boring outdated concept.

That being said – i stop playing a game once the only available activity is narrowed down to grinding or dailies. My time is limited and valuable to me, doing something unenjoyable for the sake of “progression” is not my idea of time well spent.

Estranged
Reader
Estranged

These are the type of topics I enjoy greatly. Every gamer has their own unique spin on enjoying activities.

Crafting, gathering and dailies obviously can turn into work. An obsessive achievement chaser will make “all the things work” – and the gaming companies abuse these systems. I think it is a lazy way to create activity. It backfires for a consumer like myself.

When I first started MMOs, just felt like an adventure with activities. My opinion is a lack of innovation has created simple burnout. Games that have different leveling paths keep my attention longer.

So, I level and play until it starts feeling like a job (which is going to happen eventually), then I take a sabbatical.

Reader
Bhagpuss Bhagpuss

Define “work”. If you mean repetitive activity then most of my gaming is that and it’s exactly what I want it to be. I like repetitive activity. I find it relaxing and soothing, especially after a day of the actual work I get paid to do, which mostly involves starting conversations with strangers.

If, on the other hand, by “work” you mean “something you wouldn’t do if you weren’t being paid to do it” then nothing at all that I do in my MMO time, not one second of gameplay, is “work”. It’s really simple: if anything feels like that kind of work I stop doing it and do something else.

I find it slightly odd that someone would voluntarily spend their leisure time doing something they don’t enjoy. I find it utterly incomprehensible that anyone would do so and then complain about it as though it was someone else’s decision.

Estranged
Reader
Estranged

Bhag – we perform many unpleasant activities due to social ties or addiction issues.

Reader
Stropp

I might do something unpleasant in a game for a short time, if there’s a reward I want, or I’m forced to in order to get somewhere else, or if I’m with a group that requires that. But… if it continues too long then I usually find my motivation to log in drops away and I stop playing the game.

It’s one thing to have some temporary discomfort to achieve a goal, it’s quite another if it’s permanent.

Reader
Utakata

Work verses hobbies ethos. Things one does ingames that one gladly works for in comparison to things that feels like work. And how things that feel like work are directly proportional to how retentive the requirements are to complete such activity (also see: Pointless grinding)…

…yes, these things my pigtails contemplates in deciding what they enjoy doing ingame versus what they don’t.

Eliot Lefebvre
Staff
Eliot Lefebvre

Well, let’s be fair, a lot of what I do qualifies as work, but that’s not what the question is actually answering. And frankly, the comic in question didn’t make me nod; it made me sigh, because it’s one of those “I don’t understand why people play MMOs” jokes.

I don’t play MMOs to work. I play MMOs because, quite frankly, I enjoy video games. If you told a ten-year-old version of me that you could have a version of video games that would literally never end, I would be over the moon. I’ve accomplished a lot in Final Fantasy XIV, but I’m not done with the game… and in about a month, another new mountain to climb is being added to the game, meaning that there’s more new stuff to play. There’s something new to do. It’s only “work” if you consider playing a game in the first place to be work.

This isn’t work; this is the option of having something where you don’t reach the end. You don’t find yourself hitting the point where you have nothing more to do. There is always something new to do, new fun to be found, new goals to set for yourself. It’s one of those things people don’t always get about the genre, and frankly, it mostly makes me sad for the people who don’t. There are always certain things which feel less fun than others, but if I feel like it’s work, it’s not something I’m playing for fun.

Estranged
Reader
Estranged

Eliot – after that first experience with my Atari console, never imagined the amount of gaming sosphication that would be created in actual 3D worlds. We have a cornucopia of gaming goodness.

Reader
MesaSage

I don’t like grinding mobs for rep/deeds/drops. That feels like work. Otherwise, nothing.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Archebius

Too much, which is why I’ve largely moved on from the genre at the moment. Games like TERA (which I enjoyed) do very little to hide the artifice of their zones, each one built in a circle to get you the five levels you need to move on. Very few games that I’ve played lately have felt like they had much of a community, or much that’s even worth working towards.

I’m fine putting in time and effort if I have friends and a purpose. Destiny has kept me the longest of any “MMO” since Guild Wars; I had people I played with every week, the missions (especially in the expansions) were entertaining, and you could do endgame raiding without much scraping for gear. There were a decent number of PvP modes, some where armor and gear made a difference, some where it didn’t. But most importantly, gameplay was fun. Even losing a match in PvP, you could use your ultimate and destroy a room full of pros. Even in PvE, combat could be legitimately challenging and tense.

But once my friends started grinding up their armor in the raid every week just to get to the hard mode raid, I kinda lost interest.

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

I think that was the nice thing about City of Heroes. Gameplay was fun from day one to closing minutes.

Whether it was running a bank mission or getting together in a sewer sweeping group, the combat was actiony enough to keep you occupied and still be able to type and chat with other players.

Literally the only time i can remember a BAD time in COX was the 13 hour Dr. Quarterfield Task Force. Whoever designed that deserves a paddlin…with a taser paddle.

Reader
Shiro Madoushi

ArcheAge could easily be called “Second Job Online” and nobody would argue. There are two maybe 3 methods of obtaining gold (without buying it from Trion) in ArcheAge. All of them extremely tedious and boring. I’m sure it’s intentionally designed that way to make you want to buy gold from Trion. They refuse to take any feedback on these systems and just ignore the complaints.

If you want to know the truth about it, Trion and XL games have turned average players into gold farmers. You farm the gold to sell to their gold buying customers. You never get ahead and are always farming gold to try to catch up to the guy who bought it.

Reader
Robert Mann

I remember trying it, and quitting once I realized that gold was locked behind the energy system which was little more than a paywall… and that in order to play at any level beyond bug to be stepped on with the others who were using it I would have to spend a small fortune.

The trade pack idea was okay (in that regional trade as a way to make money is a cool concept, if a little odd in an MMO where the demand mechanics are very simple) but the energy lock was… well, there is a reason I don’t play the facebook timer games constantly telling you that you can just stop waiting if you pay!

Reader
Patreon Donor
Veldan

This is the main reason I quit ArcheAge shortly after the novelty wore off. I realized that in order to get further, I needed gold, and every way of obtaining it was repetitive and extremely boring after a while.

Reader
MesaSage

That’s a pretty sad picture you’ve painted.

Reader
Ermelyn PItts

none. If it feels like “work” I stop playing.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
squidgod2000

About 97% of BDO—hence why I stopped playing.

deekay_plus
Reader
deekay_plus

IF YOU DON”T WORK FOR THINGS IN AN MMO THEN HOW WILL YOU FEEL ANY ACHIEVEMENT?

Estranged
Reader
Estranged

Damnit DK. Gonna have to meditate now. lol

deekay_plus
Reader
deekay_plus

followed by something about instant gratification, followed by something obamy loving welfare abusing casuals, followed something about being a small business owner who earns their epics the hard way playing 100 hours a week.

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

deekay, are you having internet arguments with yourself again?

deekay_plus
Reader
deekay_plus

just some relevant cliches observed over too many betas and mmo forums. XD

camren_rooke
Reader
camren_rooke

I did find it funny when the whole selling characters and rare items debate was goign on in WoW waaaay back when. The sellers were framing their argument as, “I’m not selling the item, I’m selling my work involved in getting the character to max level or to Thunderfury, Blessed Blade of the Windseeker.”

Karl Marx would be so proud!

miol
Reader
miol

XD

209b.jpg
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Pandalulz

I like how it’s both the correct argument and the talking to oneself at the same time. Clever. I wish every time I had an internal argument I got a shave, haircut, and clean new clothes. The new season is excellent.

wpDiscuz