The Daily Grind: Do you like being lost in MMOs?

In Final Fantasy XI, my first MMO, maps were few and far between, often blindingly unclear, and offered as many opportunities to be hopelessly lost as they did for finding your way. Pretty much nothing important was marked on the map even if you had one. Being lost was the default state.

This is unusual now. City of Heroes and Guild Wars both surprised me by how resistant they were to letting me get lost, and World of Warcraft now makes it nigh-on impossible. And on some level, this is undeniably a good thing, because it means I spend less time trying to find where the Thing is and more time actually interacting with the Thing.

But then, some people really do prefer that sense of not knowing where the next objective might be. So today I ask, dear readers: do you like being lost in MMOs? Is part of the excitement of the genre for you when you don’t know where to go? Or do you consider better maps and more efficient guidance to be a boon to the genre?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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78 Comments on "The Daily Grind: Do you like being lost in MMOs?"

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Sur Couf

Yes being lost is much more fun. However having some kind of compass and map with rough direction is mandatory after a few hours. I like exploring and learning how to find places in a vast world.

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Chris Brown-DeMoreno

I don’t “like being lost” per say but I do like what the possibility represents: Exploration. This was one of my favorite things about FFXI back in it’s day. You wander into a hellhole like Garliage Citidel not knowing if it’s even worth going in there and you could get hopelessly lost in the maze they built out of that place. It was dangerous but it was a fun kind of dangerous. You wanted to get out but you also wanted to see what was in the next room. More recent games, “go to the marked objective”, “interact with objective”, “maybe fight whatever spawns at objective”, “leave”. Don’t even bother exploring the ruins your at because there’s nothing there but randomly placed mobs that don’t drop squat. I miss the older games that were filled with wonder. Too much hand holding and simplicity now.

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Ian Blakeney

This concept of ‘lost’ as you describe is exactly why I loved the caves and dungeons in Vanguard (RIP). The ability to wander, explore and often stumble blindly backwards (often trying to get away from a group of dangerous mobs that were around a corner and down the ledge I fell off of) created some of my favorite moments (both solo and group) in MMOs. I also started into MMOs back in college when FFXI arrived in the US, and just navigating the creative mess that was /is Crawlers Nest, along with other parties, was an absolute joy.

Would such content attract and sustain the modern era of MMO players? Possibly, but I don’t think it has been truly implemented or even attempted in a form recently (I would say Vanguard and Early versions of EQ2 might have been the last to push this type of exploration that I can recall).

Now, currently I’m absolutely enjoying diving back into GW2 and its clear directional style as well. Being in my 30’s and now married with a career that takes up a lot of time, I fully appreciate the condensed, focused gaming experience. That said, I would love to continue to revisit and spend time in a game like Vanguard or FFXI once a week or so for longer (3-4 hour is long now #oldyoungman) with some of the more modern group development tools that have come about.

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Joe Seabreeze

I like being lost if there are things to do while lost. If I’m just running and nothing is happening around me, then it’s fail.

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Slaasher

i don’t mind being lost initially but if its going to be that way I want a map that I can edit with my own waypoints etc. I think it adds a nice touch to the whole idea of exploration in game if done correctly

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Tiresias

When you want to talk about exploration and the concept of “getting lost productively”, you pretty much have two games to reference:

Guild Wars 2, which consists of a world that’s specifically designed for exploration. From the way the “quests” are arranged (areas where you can participate in simple tasks but which are mostly designed to simply direct you to areas where other more interesting things happen) to the fact that each map is filled with locations that are both easy and difficult to reach. the game is notorious for productively derailing whatever plans you had to “get something done”. Furthermore, it rewards you for going off the beaten path with easter eggs, treasure chests, events, rare material nodes, jumping puzzles, etc. It’s worth mentioning that GW2 doesn’t make it difficult to determine where you are supposed to go to start or complete a story step, but there are often achievements that involve collecting items in hard-to-reach places.

Final Fantasy 11, which throws (or… THREW) you out into a very hostile and dangerous world with very little guidance. It’s a game where you understand why the citizens hide in cities, afraid of the surrounding countryside that is filled with vicious monsters and relics of a forgotten age. The game did not necessarily reward you for venturing off the beaten path, but navigation is a challenge in and of itself, and people who knew their way around the convoluted dungeons were valued as guides.

It’s two very different takes on the same concept, and the art form of designing games that convince the player to “get lost productively” is a fading art form.

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adri

I like exploring. I hardly ever use a “in dungeon” map in skyrim (yeah it’s mostly just a A to B thing … anyway). I just walk and explore new locations.
On the other side in some games things are so extremely well hidden and so necessary for you to find that I use guidance videos just to not freak out.

The good thing is that nothing really bad happens to you (your RL you) when you get lost in the woods. You don’t get eaten by bears or die of dehydration. The worst thing is that your character dies. If the game is well made this is something you like to avoid but nothing that makes you hit ALT+F4.

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Raimo Kangasniemi

I like exploring new places and yes, getting lost at first before filling the map not only literally but figuratively too, is very much part of the fun for me.

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thickenergy

Oh yes. Not knowing where you are in relation to much of anything else in the world is one of the charms of games like Worlds Adrift. It also provides a real and useful niche for player cartographers and explorers.

It was a sad day when Turbine added a map for the Old Forest in LotRO.

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Chris Mc

I prefer fewer in game maps. I like exploring and learning how to find places.

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Rottenrotny

Definitely yes, I like getting lost.

I understand that people come home from a long day at work and they just want to jump in LFR and kill some bosses before bed. That’s fine and there’s plenty of games like that. Hell, most of the games are like that.

But where are the giant, scary, open world games? The kind where you can hit autorun, AFK to go pee and when you come back you’re (dead) still running and have no clue where you are?

I can’t remember the last time I got lost in an MMO.

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Sorenthaz

For me there’s two different types of “being lost”: not knowing where to venture and not knowing what to do. The former is what I enjoy and what can keep me glued. The latter rapidly becomes a negative the further I get into a game, because if I have no idea what to do after a few hours into it that means the game is either lacking in content/activities or it’s poorly designed to where I can’t figure it out on my own after investing a chunk of time into it.

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NeoWolf

I love exploring, that sense of being able to go anywhere and do anything out of sequence and at will is incredibly liberating.

There is little I hate more than feeling like I am on tracks inexorably moving in only one direction with little or no say in it.

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Archebius

I have mods for Skyrim that disable the 3d map, and another that removes the compass. It’s hard for me to appreciate a map if I always just following a line from one place to another; I’m not really seeing the world, I’m just checking for whether I’m moving towards the quest marker and running.

By the same token, I want to have something I can check occasionally to make sure I haven’t veered wildly off course. As always, a balance with good design is usually optimal for me.

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Dug From The Earth

Depends on your definition of “Being lost”.

If its, “I have no idea what im supposed to do next in this quest” then no, I do not like that one bit.

If its, “wow, where the hell am I, ive never seen this cave before, I guess I better start exploring” then hell yes… i enjoy that.

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Tobasco da Gama

Game Maker’s Toolkit on YouTube has a couple of good videos on this topic.

Following the Little Dotted Line
Why Nathan Drake Doesn’t Need a Compass

Kind of the sum total of what he’s getting at is that building a game world that doesn’t need maps and quest markers can be a huge boon to immersion, but it also takes a massively larger degree of thought, design, and playtesting to pull off without being frustrating.

MMOs in general have a “more is more” philosophy that just isn’t conducive to map-less, marker-less quest design. Filling an MMO world with content that meets the same standards as The Witcher 3 or even Uncharted just wouldn’t work.

Secret World finds a good balance by using markers for the vast majority of its quests and then cordoning its “no handholding” content off as investigation quests. (Especially in SWL where you can have an Investigation mission and Main Mission going at the same time.)

The alternative approach would be something like pre-HoT GW2 where the game gave you carrots instead of hitting you with a stick. You could just go anywhere and find something to do, rather than being given “go here, do this” vector quests.

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Greaterdivinity

In a limited capacity, yes. I enjoy needing to explore and figure things out, but only after the way has been pointed a bit. I don’t like fumbling around in the dark (metaphorically) or needing to look up deep guides etc. online, but getting the foundation laid by the game and having the game point me in a direction, and then letting me run with it from there, is very enjoyable. I like handholding, but only a little. Not too much, but not too little either. Juuuust the right amount.

View post on imgur.com

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Schlag Sweetleaf

All maps and no exploring makes Jack a dull boy

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Utakata

What is that thing that shows up behind the frozen Jack at the end? o.O

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Schlag Sweetleaf
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Thomas

Olaf is what makes The Shining so very scary. :)

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Jeff Mauney

At the time I started playing EverQuest (August of ’99) this player-made map was the only map available. Looking at it now brings back a flood of great memories, mostly of exploration and discovery.

There is much to be said for not having every detail of the world available at your fingertips. It’s what puts the mystery in a virtual world. Much of that is gone now, as modern MMOs seek to cater to the widest possible market. The lowest common denominator may be good for the bottom line, but it’s terrible for gamers who prefer immersion over instant gratification.

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Melissa McDonald

I got a cloth map with my game.

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Jeff Mauney

Indeed. I had forgotten about that cloth map. Allow me to amend my statement: “It was the only useful map available at the time.” =)

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Wanda Clamshuckr

I cut my MMO teeth using those maps to navigate EQ. It was so different in those days. There’s nothing quite like crossing a series of zones for the first time (which could take an hour to get from A to B on foot), truly fearful of mobs and getting killed out in the middle of nowhere. I haven’t experienced that particular adrenaline rush, or need for awareness, in over 15 years.

Experiences like those from EQ, and to a lesser extent DAoC, helped to shape my desire of exploring. Sure, give me a map, but also give me the freedom to trot off the roads into the woods, and meander off into the distance.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

The Old Forest in LOTRO originally was an unforgiving maze with a useless map. It was so bad, so utterly annoying, so terribly humiliating that I spent a week in there learning every single pathway, dead end and secret way so that I would never be lost in there again. The current OF, with it’s lovely map and obvious routes, is nothing compared to the old one.

For the most part, I am okay with being lost if I’m by myself. It’s an adventure! But not when I’m in a group. Nothing rattles me more than having the group surge ahead and leave me behind, especially in a dungeon I am unfamiliar with. I will immediately panic and go in the wrong direction because my sense of direction sucks, even in games. Nothing like stumbling into mobs the group has gone around and dying.

This is actually one of the things I look for when I play with people I don’t know. Those that stick around and make sure we all advance together and those that charge off without regard to the success or failure of everyone to follow. This is one of the reasons I hate dungeoneering in WoW (where no one bothers about anyone else) and but really enjoy it in LOTRO.

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Loopy

I really enjoy being lost in an MMO where i have to find my quest objective or item, and end up following instructions from the quest text and narration. To me that’s immersive, and one additional reason why i applaud ESO for not having a default mini map.

On the other hand, i do not enjoy being lost in an MMO where i have no idea where to go next or what to do next. Roaming around aimlessly just to hope that i’m going in the right direction is not my idea of fun.

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Chillos Smith Jr.

In-game maps are super convenient and make progression MUCH easier. I admit, when I started playing Elder Scrolls and they didn’t have a minimap, I immediately went and installed the addon that gives me one.

But there is a certain kind of…romance, about not having a minimap, or an in-game map at all. I spent many years navigating the world of Norrath (EverQuest) with nothing but a printed out hard copy of a map I found online that I’d have to compare to landmarks I’d find in game and a poorly trained direction sense skill and a known game quirk that caused daggers dropped on the ground to always point north.

It FEELS like my life now demands more game in less time than it did back then, but in truth – I still game about as much as I did back then. I think that I’ve just become accustomed to being spoon fed the world and maps and tips and all the other conveniences modern mmorpg’s have been handing to me the past decade plus vs. the beloved and unkind entity that is the first gen mmorpg. I have nostalgia for the former, I think it’s more immersive, I know and love the world of Norrath more than all others – it’s my digital home in the same way that I still call my parents house “home”, even though I’ve not lived there in nearing 30 years.
But when it comes to entertainment, I’d rather PLAY a game that hands me a gps and a map and dangles icons over important people and places because I’ve become spoiled and I admit it. :p

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Zen Dadaist

That rather depends. If I’ve got a tight time-limit, there’s a giant mob chasing me that’ll kill me if it catches up, I’m taking continuous damage form the environment and cannot heal or otherwise have massive stressors on me – then no I absolutely despise being lost.

If it’s a large interesting place to explore at my leisure on my own terms, and if I do have an emergency ‘warp home’ button then it’s a completely different setup. If I don’t know where I am exactly (i.e. lost) then no biggie, there might be something cool over there in that cave.

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Melissa McDonald

I don’t know. I had to find something using map coordinates the other night in LOTRO and I have to confess it felt oddly primitive.

Maybe it’s a good thing, though. The game has become awfully easy. Get quest, follow quest arrow, do quest, turn-in quest.

It used to take a great deal of exploring, even detective work to figure out exactly where something was for a quest, because there was no arrow or helper.

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Utakata

There’s a difference between losing yourself in a game and just getting plain lost. I much prefer the former over the latter.

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hurbster

Had enough wasted time wandering around lost in Tes 3 Morrowind to want to do that again.

I have a terrible sense of direction and would regularly get lost in dungeons and getting to dungeons in WoW.

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thalendor

For me, it depends on the game.

In something like WoW, where you’re given a quest objective, and a huge part of your reward is tied to the completion of that objective, then no, I don’t like being lost at all; it feels too much like being punished when I’m not able to find where I need to go. In something like EverQuest, at least as it existed when I started playing it, I enjoyed exploring, sometimes getting lost, and learning the lay of the land much more since it was up to me to create my own objectives and I didn’t feel like I was being penalized for not being able to find a specific mob or item.

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Alex Malone

Getting lost in-and-of itself is negative, but it can lead to positive experience. So, it comes down to the type of game the developers are going to make making – a proper virtual world, or just another linear themepark. It also depends what sort of pressures are being placed on the players – if they get lost, are they going to feel like it is a waste of time (because they lose time from grinding quests/xp) or will they see it as an opportunity (because they can explore and progress that way as well)?

If the developer has attempted to make a proper MMORPG, then maps/quest markers/guidance are all negative forces for the game. Games with minimal or no guidance in terms of navigation force the user to really pay attention to where they are and what is going on. They have to pay attention to quest text / dialogue to get clues as to where to go. This all leads to much greater immersion in the world, something essential for building a long term community.

However, if the developers have just made a generic linear themepark, there probably isn’t much worth getting lost in and it is probably hard to get lost anyway. Community is not a goal of these games, nor is immersion, it is all about instant gratification. So, in these sorts of games, yes, give us a detailed map and quest markers so that I can efficiently plough through every zone and get to the combat quicker.

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Melissa McDonald

I’m playing LOTRO with a guy new to MMOs and he wandered off by himself, not understanding how to use the map. The happy accident was he discovered those 3 trolls that Gandalf turned to stone in The Hobbit. We’d otherwise had no reason to go into that little vale, so, hey. “Not all who wander are lost”, as JRR would say. :)

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Maggie May

A good part of my time in LOTRO was spent sneaking .. Around trolls and Orcs, especially Moria. I must admit Moria defeated me until I came back and saved my sorry ass. I found myself lost so many times until eventually I knew it well. One thing I love to do is to explore with the UI removed, FFXIV didn’t have large zones but the atmosphere was magical in certain areas. Never finished my beastiery (sp.) but that’s how I love getting lost in a game. Forgetting the game and wandering off to save the Goobbues or start a revolt to free the slaves.

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Simon Morris

@Eliot Lefebvre;

“City of Heroes and Guild Wars both surprised me by how resistant they were to letting me get lost,”
……

Oh come on now, Perez Park! – PEREZ PARK!!!, …. O.M.G that was frustrating!, I saw level 50’s remarking “I haven’t been down here in a while, how the hell do i get out of here again? (lol)”

God i miss that game.
*cries hugging knees & rocking in a corner*

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camren_rooke

Got to agree there. I installed two mods for City of Heroes. The one which changed all text to Comic Sans and the map overlay for Perez Park.

That place was easy to get lost in.

*sits next to ya, “I miss it to.”

abyssalstar
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abyssalstar

All the Circle of Thorns in there…

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Thomas

No, I do not like being lost in MMOs, though I do enjoy exploring new zones so I will be “less lost.”

One of the first things I do in entering a new zone in any MMO is to scope it out and fill in all the “undiscovered” areas of the map. It makes me feel more secure, I guess.

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Bryan Turner

Not really it pisses me off when I get lost and can’t find something.

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Thomas

I have to agree with this. I am directionally challenged at the best of times — and even with minimaps and overhead maps I can get really scrambled.

This is probably one of the reasons I detested LotRO’s Mines of Moria expansion so much. Even the overhead maps didn’t help much in there.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Ah, yes. Getting lost in the old MoM was a rite of passage. Especially back in the days when there was no LFF to port you to dungeon entrances. 16th Hall? Who even knows how to get there these days. And Skumfil? OMG, getting there for me was a nightmare. And I never did find my way to DN before LFF. Thank God for Captains.

Yeah, those were the days when I would level my characters in Eregion, then run straight through MoM to the sunlight of Dimrill Dale and never look back. Yes, all the quests were bright orange and the mobs could nearly one-shot, but at least I knew where I was.

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Melissa McDonald

I’m frankly amazed you could run through Moria without dying…

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Minimalistway

It is hard to be really lost in most modern games, i love to walk around, explore and notice the world, but i need a way to go back, i can’t tell how many times i lost my base home in Minecraft, but now with a compass i can go back.

Maps in MMOs today provide too much information, you have to turn off settings to be able to see less info, so i really never experienced being lost in an MMO, an NPC ask you to go there and kill this one NPC, but the map put a mark at where the NPC is, there is no thinking here, the map is like a GPS, it knows too much.

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Schmidt.Capela

Being lost was the default state.

Not for everyone. The first thing I do when I first catch a break after entering a new region is to thoroughly explore it, even creating a map if none exists. I do prefer when maps already exist, saving me all the trouble of creating my own, though.

Basically, I really don’t like being lost, and will do whatever is required to not get lost even if the devs intended for the players to get lost. I’m the kind of person that played old single-player games from before minimaps became common with graphing paper in hand.

On the other hand, I do love “getting lost” in the figurative sense: when you have so many interesting things to see and do that it’s difficult to decide which to do first. In other words, the kind of “getting lost” where I know perfectly well where I am, but haven’t decided yet where I want to go.

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Lauren Cupcake

There’s a weird disconnect between MMOs constantly on the content treadmill because what they release doesn’t entertain players for long enough and this idea that they should drag you by the wrist up to every piece of content so you don’t accidentally miss it. Getting lost doesn’t have to be a bad thing, as long as maps are not made intentionally infuriating to delay players. I hope one day a game will be brave enough to remove quest markers and guided walking paths (lookin’ at you BDO) and be successful at it so that others emulate the practice. So, yes. Sometimes I like being lost and exploring. Except for the maguuma jungle in GW1. Fuck that place.

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Schmidt.Capela

Old MMOs didn’t have it. Among MMOs WoW was one of the first to provide quest markers, and back then they were only used on quest givers and only visible on the map when you were in visual range of the quest giver.

End result, external sites that provided questing maps, spoiling everything about all quests, became wildly popular. And for a good while the single most used WoW addon was one that pointed players to quest objectives and follow-up quests.

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Lauren Cupcake

Yup, it’s a great case of “be careful what you wish for”

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camren_rooke

Maggie the Jackcat’s was my go to site for Asherons Call.

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Pandalulz

Yeppers, and then there was an addon I think as well that I used to show me where stuff was. Or maybe I found the stuff on the website, and the addon just showed me how to get there. It’s been a really long time.

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agemyth đŸ˜©

Not in a game designed like World of Warcraft or with that kind of questing.

I still love to get lost in EQ1 zones even though some of them probably weren’t intended to be something to get lost in. I just started FF11 for my first real try at that game and so much of it reminds me of EQ1, including getting lost (even with the maps).

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Wolfyseyes

Not particularly, though I will admit that the feeling of figuring things out and learning the lay of the land is enjoyable enough.

I’m not enough of the Explorer Player Archetype to find that kind of thing terribly compelling, but I can appreciate why others do.

Leontes
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Leontes

Every now and then I yearn for the feel of the old forest, back when there was no map and my sense of direction betrayed me time and again. But a faint reminder the feel of the black desert…

Honestly, there is no topping the sense of immersion you derive from getting lost in a vast, hostile world. IMHO, a few steps back would mean a huge advance for my enjoyment of the genre (Don’t get me started here…).

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Dividion

The Old Forest before they added the map was a beautiful thing. All of the zone maps are filled in now too, so discovering new places isn’t as rewarding either. Now all we’ve really got are unmapped dungeons and the hedge maze, which obscures the minimap.

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CthulhuDawg

After having played SoTA all we have left to hope for at the moment is Camelot Unchained and Pantheon. Wild Terra maybe, but it needs more players, their systems are great but it’s hard to get anything real going.

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Leontes

Yeah, I’m keeping my fingers crossed Camelot Unchained will turn out to be my cup of tea. I tend to be awfully picky, though… Wild Terra is off my list, though… :/

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quark1020

It depends on where I get lost and why. Places like caves or dungeons, for example, I most certainly do not enjoy. In those cases, I’m either trying to get something inside of it or trying to get out, and getting lost in there means being stuck in there.

Getting lost on the world map, on the other hand, I don’t minds as much much. Its still an inconvenience, since I only ever get lost because I was trying to get to a location and I was being blocked by a mountain or a canyon, and the monsters outside my level range may get in my way. However, I do enjoy the scenery while I travel, and if its the first time I play a particular game, I can see what kind of enemies I can expect at a later time. If I can also get some warp/flight points by accident, all the better.

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TheDonDude

I haven’t been lost in an MMO since EverQuest, where I’d have to navigate by player-made maps printed out on paper. It was great back then, but like a lot of things I don’t know if it’d translate well to the modern MMO scene.

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Modrain

I don’t consider getting lost a part of the genre, but it’s certainly one of the reasons I prefer abstract maps to overly detailed ones, and open worlds to linear successions of small quest-gated areas with invisible walls.

Honestly, anything that makes me feel like I’m in within a vast environment is a huge plus for me, and being able to get lost (assuming it’s not because everything looks identical) is certainly one of these things.

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FreecczLaw

I kind of enjoy both depending on the situation. Always knowing where to go isn’t fun, but never knowing isn’t fun either.

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MesaSage

I refuse to ask directions.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

This guy wouldn’t steer you wrong.

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quark1020

Seems like a trustworthy fellow. Maybe he’ll know where the nearest Starbucks is.

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Ian Blakeney

Kingsmouth is in Maine, it would be a Dunkin Donuts :) – an there would be seven within two streets of you at all times.

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Bryan Correll

Starbucks? Support local businesses and get your coffee at Susie’s.

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camren_rooke

The only game I have ever enjoyed being lost in was Asherons Call. Could head off in a direction and wander wander, occasionally fight monsters, occasionally find a ruin or a random dungeon.

When I was full up on goodies or out of healing rolls, head back to town to toss stuff on the market, resupply and head out again.

Can’t say I remember ever feeling that sense of wanderlust since then.

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Nic Hickman

Yeah in Asheron’s Call I used to get lost all the time. I remember asking directions to a town once – pretty sure I got told the “This way Kills Newbs” route. Was fun though. I liked that although the map was god awful, you had lots of magical methods of transportation at your disposal, between portal and LS summons and recalls, and the various portal hubs that were discovered.

I still think whoever first discovered the Abandonned Mines and found the portals must have been like “holy shi….”

I feel like AC2 got the balance right. It was a bit clearer where you were on the map, and a few key features were labelled, but lots still had to be discovered by looking around.

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CthulhuDawg

When I first started playing EQ at the tail end of 99 I was a young cleric wandering the commonlands. I’m following the zone wall, way safer than the “path” everyone says to take when I see a small cave. “I’m going to check that out” I say and move in. I’m greeted by skeles abound and I just got my first undead dd spell. I work my way to towards the end and find a locked door, but wait, didn’t I loot a key from that skeleton with a different name? *18 years of adventure later…

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camren_rooke

That was the old school DnD Pen and paper feeling.

What a drug!

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rafterman

One of my favorite things in MMOs used to be the ability to get lost or find areas that other people had never seen. In early EQ exploring was a big part of what hooked me about the game. MMOs today have pretty much killed the exploration part of things and is probably a large factor in my playing them less and less.

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CthulhuDawg

I haven’t been lost since we stopped having to draw our own maps. It would be interesting to see what that was like again.

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Xijit

It was quite possible to get lost in Ark … Especially at night.

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CthulhuDawg

I’ll never know scorpy, dayz clones grate my patience, I’ll keep that in my mind dumpster.

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Wolfyseyes

Permission to add “mind dumpster” to my personal lexicon?

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Kickstarter Donor
CthulhuDawg

All you my dude.

quark1020
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quark1020

Hell, you might get lost in Ark even in the day, especially in the forests. The game has a map, but it doesn’t mark your location. You’ll have to build your own compass and, at a higher tier, you can build a GPS device. Until then though, you’ll have to figure out if that hut you built on the coast is towards your right and hope you chose correctly.

On that note, though, I suggest waiting for a deep steam sale before you get Ark. Just saying, $60 is a lot for it.

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Kickstarter Donor
CthulhuDawg

I got it for free and I won’t play it. I just don’t dig the new wave survival games, like, at all. If I’m going to be sinking the kind of time those games require to build bases and raise animals etc I would rather do it in an MMO. Just me though, my friends list is full of people playing DayZ, Conan, Ark etc.

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