Ni no Kuni is getting a mobile MMORPG from Netmarble

    
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That headline may come as a surprise to some considering the Ni no Kuni franchise has mostly been about exploring a very Studio Ghibli-esque world in a single-player JRPG format. Nevertheless, Netmarble has officially announced a mobile MMORPG based on the series and, personally, I will be let down if Drippy the fairy isn’t there.

Information on this new mobile MMO is thin right now, but reports indicate that multiplayer will be focused on Kingdoms, which allow players to cooperate and compete with other guilds for some unstated purpose. Players will also be able to collect and train spirits known as Imazen to join them on their journey.

More details are expected to be announced at this year’s G-Star event, though prospects of this game’s arrival to the West are probably threadbare at best. Still, there’s always the single-player games and its awesome soundtrack for us to enjoy.

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Jeremy Barnes

Sad. I did not expect this franchise to be abused in this way.
Can we stop calling mobile games “MMORPGS” while we’re at it?
I go to the grocery store and there are a lot of people there, but it’s not a “social hangout”

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Robert Mann

Neither are most MMOs on PC. Very few have much role playing besides combat and the trinity involved. There’s little to no world or formalities involved, no authority structure that actually matters, etc.

If we say that mobile games that are at best nominally an MMORPG must not be called an MMORPG… then what do we start calling them on other platforms?

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Jeremy Barnes

I get you had a point that you wanted to make, but it doesn’t jive with my complaint. “MMOs on Other platforms” you generally see other players and they don’t just exist on a “friends list” that has a non player controlled character added to your party.

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kgptzac

If you go to the actual page of netmarble’s announcement, you can see clearly it mentions MMORPG without the need to understand Korean. In absence of contrary evidence of why this game shouldn’t be called an MMORPG, this article is correct to assume the genre of the upcoming game from the official source.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

You’re complaining without really knowing the multiplayer component that is going to exist in the game. There are many “real” MMORPGs out on mobile. Maybe wait to see what the multiplayer in the title is going to be like before claiming it’s not an MMORPG!

There also are a lot of decent games on mobile in between the trash titles. So saying it’s being abused before seeing what they do with the title simply because it’s being made on mobile is a bit out there too.

Anyway, I’m all for a different name for games with limited multiplayer interaction. This started on PC though, calling games with very minimal interaction with other people on either friends lists or in town areas “MMORPGs”. Mobile didn’t start it. Many games there just clung on to it, as they saw that’s a way to bring people to your game.

This is a debate that’s been going on for as long as I’ve been able to read about MMORPGs. We certainly won’t settle it here and now.

Although I get venting your frustration with the whole thing, you’re doing so before you even see what the game actually ends up being like and having for multiplayer.

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Jeremy Barnes

Name that PC game.

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Robert Mann

So judging by what little we know it’s about as close to Ni no Kuni as having a few assets off the prior games and having a pet system… XD

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cursedseishi

I… I want to be excited hearing this. I wish I could say I was excited…

But I ain’t. I bought 3 Ni No Kuni titles, 1 was brilliant, 1 was trash that I immediately regretted paying the additional $$s for the season pass about 3 hours into it, and one was a re-release of the brilliant one just last month or so.

Which is to say, anything having to do with Ni No Kuni 2 or past that is now a hard pass for me. NnK2 had literally none of the character the first title had, less enemy variation than an asset flip, and a story that blew the full and entire load of its creativity on one town (Goldpaw) before it immediately hit bedrock bottom in quality afterwards.

Aaand now they decide to make a mobile game based off of… what, the barebone kingdoms? And I’m guessing it’ll be from the kingdoms of the second game too since we’re avoiding just about everything from the first game…

Which, unfortunately, means we’ll probably missing out on our Lord High Lord of the Fairies, as they’ve likely turned his lamp off years ago…

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Bannex

More like Ni *sunglasses* Nope Kuni…

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Utakata

I think it means “Another World” from what I gather. o.O

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Robert Mann

Quick translation notes: Ni = 2. Kuni means country. No is a connective word, relating one to the other. Thus, The second country.

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Utakata

…that’s probably how that was translated for popular consumption. Lot’s examples of that. Shingeki no Kyojin doesn’t really mean Attack on Titan. That said, I much prefer “Second Country”, IMO. So thanks for explaining. :)

Btw, I’ve always presumed “no” over there is a version of “of” over hear. o.O

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Ian Wells

Very few languages translate one for one – outside of nouns and some verbs. – particul0arly ones that evolved completely isolated from one another. More esoteric words (adjectives, conjunctions, pronouns, ect) are the linguistic equivalent of the wild west, where just about anything goes.

‘no’ doesn’t meant “of” so much as it is like the medical Latin suffix ‘-al’, which is defined as meaning “relating to or of” (lingual/”of the tongue/lingua” ; dermal/”of the skin/dermis” ; ect.).

Side note: Japanese is a highly contextual language, and assumes the listener knows what the speaker is referring to or referencing. Words like ‘no’ assume the reader understands how the preceding and following nouns relate to one another. This uncertainty is often intentional by a creator, adding a level of obfuscation that only becomes clear as the reader progresses in the story. Other times, it is meant to give two meanings. In the case of “Ni no Kuni”, it is likely the latter. “The Second Country” refers to the country building mechanic in both games and “Country of Two” can refer to how both games start with a pair of characters becoming essentially refuges searching for a new home.

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Utakata

So yes and no? o.O

…fair enough though. And to be fair, most of this I am gathering from much of the manga I am reading…so this is still way out of field of expertise. I just wish they covered more of this in Schoolhouse Rock back in the day. >.<

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Robert Mann

What Ian just said. Basically, the ‘no’ there ties country to second (later articles tend to be the more focused items in Japanese) so it is more of a “Country, apply second, therefore ‘Second Country'”.

I’m not a full expert by any means, I only studied a little for places I was visiting. So where I can do some simple stuff, going too far into things or uncommon words makes me stumble.

For example, Kyojin is actually ‘Giant’ and not specifically ‘Titan’ from what I can tell, so the better translation would be “Giant attack, or Attack of the Giants.” Why they chose to change that is likely due to some conflicts with the naming here, and Titan being close enough to Giant they just went with that. As to why the context went to attacking them, instead of the reverse… not sure at all.