Player who claims a mobile RPG’s gacha mechanics were falsely advertised loses court case

    
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Player who claims a mobile RPG’s gacha mechanics were falsely advertised loses court case

Fair game monetization and gamer spending are topics that are on the minds of many right now, and one of the more slippery monetization schemes involves “gacha” mechanics, aka buying something for a chance at a character unlock. This is often used in a variety of mobile RPGs such as Laplace M, otherwise known as Kingdom of the Wind.

One man fell into a spending spiral over this particular title, reportedly taking out loans from banks and friends and even losing his job due to his desire to unlock characters; he ultimately made 3,133 gacha tries and spent approximately $15,000. He sought damages in the amount of $30,000 against Laplace M developer X-Legend Entertainment, claiming that the game’s gacha mechanics were false advertising.

The developer’s argument leaned heavily on the user agreement which outlines that players are not guaranteed certain items, an argument that a Taiwanese court found to be strong enough to dismiss the player’s case. GNN reports that the Taipei District Court found the player to be irresponsible with his finances and that he should spend more wisely.

Moral of the story: Maybe take a moment to read that EULA. And spend responsibly if you must spend on any game.

source: GNN via MMO Culture

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Mewmew
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Mewmew

Plus if he won that 30k, he would have just turned around and spent it on lockboxes in games anyway.

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Robert Mann

Just STOP SPENDING MONEY ON ABUSIVE MONETIZATION MECHANICS.

Sorry for the shouting all. They will fix themselves if people do that.

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Jim Bergevin Jr

At some point, personal responsibility needs to come into play. It’s gotten to the point that it borders on the rediculous how we feel the need to always blame someone else for our problems instead of looking in the mirror.

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Jack Pipsam

reportedly taking out loans from banks and friends and even losing his job due to his desire to unlock characters

Bruh.

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Bruno Brito

Y i k e s

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Arktouros

Hopefully this person will now take ownership of their problem instead of trying to blame others and seek both the financial and psychological help that they need in addressing their problem.

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Utakata

Also “The Devil made me do it”, is certainly not best way to address the issues around lootbox shenanigans. /le sigh

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Adam Russell

What was his legal basis for the claim of false advertising? Did he really think he was guaranteed a character unlock?

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cursedseishi

From the article linked, it looks like he was trying to get a full set of items from a limited time promotion in the game.

It isn’t uncommon, seeing as literally every mobile game with monetization utilizes such things. You’ll also see “spend X for a guaranteed Y” a lot too. Being unable to speak to the game or the event, I’m guessing that might have been what led to him claiming false advertising. It isn’t technically false, per-say… but these games mislead a lot. The article also says he suffers from an anxiety disorder so…

Yeah. Limited time event, anxiety upon losing out on something (how all these games work). Not a healthy or great combination here.

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Greaterdivinity

GNN reports that the Taipei District Court found the player to be irresponsible with his finances and that he should spend more wisely.

On a micro-level, I fully agree. Dude needs some serious financial advice.

On a macro level, we’re getting closer and closer to governments potentially needing to step in to regulate this shit, and that’s a lose-lose situation for everyone involved. Sooner or later this shit will boil over and we’ll start seeing countries laying down the law in ways that make developers and players unhappy. And sadly both with share the blame, though not equally as the bigger share absolutely falls on developers.

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Mikka Hansen

On investors, not developers. Actually, I wonder if talking about developers in plural makes sense nowadays.

I tend to imagine that this days the dev team of any mobile game consists of one project manager, one intern doing a lil bit of extremly simplistic coding, one graphics designer, and an army of psychologists laying out the gameplay loop