E-sports, permadeath, and completionist are now in the dictionary.com

    
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E-sports

Dictionary.com has granted a bit of legitimacy to a trio of gaming terms. E-sports, permadeath, and completionist were among the latest batch of words enshrined in the online reference site’s ever-growing lexicon.

The site relies on “research in traditional publications, as well as technology like corpus research. In our case, we are currently using a corpus that has over 19 billion words. The corpus contains a massive collection of sources, from literature to news articles to television and interview transcripts, balanced to reflect actual usage of language.”

[Via: IGN; Source: Dictionary.com]
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Detton
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Detton

Damonvile It’s like a black fly in my chardonnay.

SwobyJ
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SwobyJ

I feel they should have taken more time for this. I don’t think that a word used for only 1-2 decades should be treated as legitimate as most other words. It should have been given another 1, maybe even 2 decades.

But change, it is being accepted faster and faster, I guess.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

Yeah, it’s really “ironic”

blast tyrant
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blast tyrant

mourasaint Totally disagree with the sentiment, but that jibe at the end made me chuckle and golf clap while sitting in my office.  Good show!

Makovorn
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Makovorn

The evolution of language is fascinating. Oxford already have words like “permadeath” and “muggle” (even though Google spell-check desperately wants me to change it to “permeate” and “smuggle” lol). In March 2015 alone, they added over 500 new words in their quarterly update.
Translating some of those new terms to our native languages here in South Africa … now that’s the real challenge. Even today, phrases like “via point” is a bit of a challenge in Zulu, and up to recently involved a lengthy explanation rather than simple, a two syllable phrase.
Even though there aren’t many Zulu MMO players down here (that I know of at least), there is a surprisingly thriving gaming community in other genres where these terms might still be applicable. Inevitably, most of these words will probably just be thrown into sentences verbatim. We’re already lending and mixing up words a lot anyway.
It will be interesting to see how other popular langues in game localization i.e. German, French etc. makes of this. “Immer tot”?  “Mort permanente”? :p

mourasaint
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mourasaint

Estranged that’s literally true (apparently “literally” now means “really”).

Cyberlight
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Cyberlight

As others have said, language is fluid. Watching it flow can be interesting.

For example (you can ignore the rest of this post if grammar bores you), a large number of internet users type “your” when they mean “you’re”, “then” when they mean “than” and “to” when they mean “too” (picking some common errors at random). But the really interesting thing I find is that sometimes they’ll post something where it seems they paused and thought a bit harder than usual. “I’m sure there’s a different form of this word I’m supposed to use here,” they say to themselves, and duly switch to using “you’re”, “than” or “too”.

However, if someone is used to saying “Your an idiot” all the time, when they want to dislike someone else’s comment they might say “You’re comment is full of fail”. They have, in a funny way, identified the difference between a contraction and a possessive (even if they don’t know those terms), except that they’ve mixed up the forms.Again they might say “I’m better then you”, and follow it up with “If you don’t know, than you’ll never know”. Once again they’ve identified a difference, but got the two words completely mixed up.

Of course the really interesting thing is that in fifty years’ time, or howsoever long it might take, it’s entirely possible that the contraction of “you are” really becomes “your” (with the added possibility that “you’re” really replaces the possessive singular/plural pronoun “your”). And so on for other often-confused words.

These are just examples, of course, and I’m not claiming any expertise here at all. But having said all that, the fact that language is in flux doesn’t mean that someone can’t be accused of illiteracy. If the percentage of people who can’t tell the difference between “its” and “it’s” is less than 95%, I’m a paladin who loves being nerfed each and every patch. :)

Rebel Engie
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Rebel Engie

dirtyklingon 
At least the 70’s and 80’s grade schools thought the difference between “you’re” and “your”.

Rebel Engie
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Rebel Engie

PurpleCopper
And where will it end?
Will eventually the entire know-your-meme website end up in dictionary.com?

PurpleCopper
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PurpleCopper

My gods, all this lingo is fucking up the English language. In another decade or so, the entire language will consist of nothing but internet speak.
Oh man, I’ve been too careless and have taken the English language for granted. How wrong I was. 
I should I have respected the English language and treated it better.

But now it’s too late.

Dictionary.com might as well copy-paste the entire Urbandictionary.com while they’re at it.