Pathfinder adds mules, cautions against attacking them

    
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Goblinworks has added mules to Pathfinder Online, according to a new dev blog by designer Lee Hammock. Mules are intended to make long-range travel easier for traders and to spur economic interaction. They’re also intended to be targets for bandits and, interestingly, are “not something every gatherer out in the wood brings along with them every time they go out.”

Hammock says that mules are mainly to move large quantities of goods on special occasions, and he also details how players can go about acquiring and using mules. The mules aren’t without risks, as their AI is based on Pathfinder’s monster AI and therefore may behave unexpectedly if attacked or subjected to spell casts. Hammock cautions players to use their mules carefully, as the devs won’t be able to recover any lost inventory that your mule may have been carrying.

Source: Dev blog
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wjowski
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wjowski

Damonvile 
I thought we were deer now?

wjowski
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wjowski

thickenergy 
Charging a sub fee for an alpha test.

wmmarcellino
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wmmarcellino

thickenergy If you do try, find a settlement pronto and play with them.  That’s where the juice is.  Poking around solo in the NPC city (Thornkeep) isn’t any fun.

wmmarcellino
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wmmarcellino

Craywulf Just FYI, the mules are likely to be used for bulk resources, not crafted items.  Crafted items aren’t super heavy, so you could grab a bunch of T2 swords and run them to market without a mule (maybe harder with a bunch of armor sets).  But bulk goods need mules.  Basically every settlement supports a certain level of training, and the higher the level, the more bulk goods your settlement needs for weekly upkeep.  Those bulk goods come from the Outposts in hexes you own.  So for example we at Ozem’s Vigil have hunting camps and lumberjack camps in woodlands hexes, mining camps and stonecutting camps in hills hexes, farms in croplands, etc.  And they all continuously produce  (heavy) bulk goods that we in turn need to transport back to our city.  
Therefore: mules.

If we can generate and transport lots of bulk goods, we can be high level, and fight against bad, rotten scum like Golgotha, and be better allies to very good, wonderful people like the dwarves of Forgeholm and the crafters of Alderwag.  But if the disgusting scum of Golgotha and the Empire of Xelias can raid our mule caravans and steal our bulk goods, they help themselves and hurt us.

thickenergy
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thickenergy

Midgetsnowman thickenergy My issue with most everything you’ve said is that the game was never meant to be nor promoted as this other game that you think they should be making. I’ve only been following the development very casually and I even I know that.

Hence my confusion at the hate parade following the game around. This game shouldn’t even be a thing the people that are so against it are even paying attention to in the first place because it’s so far out of what you want, and was always going to be.

As for the game’s community, I can’t speak to that. I haven’t played nor do I frequent the forums. All of this has piqued my curiosity though and I may take some time to try out the free 15 day trial that the game has now.

wmmarcellino
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wmmarcellino

Damonvile Actually, combat does remove items from the economy, through two separate mechanics.  Maybe learn about the actual game mechanics?  Then you can conduct an informed analysis.  I don’t mean that this would necessarily be a game you would like–could totally not be your kind of game.  But you’re arguing passionately about the game outcomes  when you clearly don’t know anything about the in-game mechanics.

wmmarcellino
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wmmarcellino

Damonvile Competing over resources is clearly part of political economy.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

Craywulf Damonvile You can call it blind all you want, it doesn’t make it right. Decay removes items from a closed system. Stealing does not. If anything it makes it worse, because the crafter makes more so there is three swords instead of 2. That’s increasing the supply without changing the demand. Not how a healthy economy works.

wmmarcellino
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wmmarcellino

Midgetsnowman Not really.  Arguing about the gameplay of a game…you don’t play?  That takes a special kind of stupid :)

Craywulf
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Craywulf

Damonvile You’re trying too hard to use a  real life analogy with video games, which vast majority are about killing and pillaging.

I am not justifying ganking, its an appalling behavior among gamers. I am justifying the developers in saying that this is what they want and cits working as they intended, not what cynics think its intended to be.

As for not affecting the economy, you and I both have a shiny sword, I get mine stolen by you. You have two swords and I have none. What are you going do with two swords? Dual weld them or sell the stolen sword? Furthermore, and quite possibly most important thing is I have no sword…do I steal one back or buy a new one? If you can’t see how that makes the economy go around then I pity your blindness.