It’s getting more expensive to join the Overwatch League

If you didn’t get in on the ground floor of the Overwatch League with a professional team of your own, just know that it’s going to cost you greatly to join up in the future.

This is because the popularity and success of the e-sports league is driving up the price of a team buy-in. Initially, the cost was $20 million for each of the 12 teams, but this looks to be on the rise for future franchise owners.

ESPN is estimating that, depending how the first season of OWL pans out, the second season could wield a buy-in price of $35M to $60M. “In the past three months, though, the Overwatch League has exceeded its revenue expectations, and several league sources said that the league is at almost four times its original projection. The league got a reported $90 million, two-year Twitch deal, and its two-year deals with HP Omen and Intel are worth $17 million and $10 million, respectively,” the news agency reported.

Source: ESPN via Blizzard Watch. Thanks Sally!
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possum440 .
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possum440 .

What a pyramid scheme.

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Sally Bowls

Just because I don’t eSport doesn’t mean I cant poke my fellow elders:

League of Lawyers: Esports is creating a new class of white-collar jobs

So your kid could grow up to be an eSports Therapist; I bet you would be so proud.

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Melissa McDonald

If corporations pay it, then Blizzard looks pretty smart.

Just imagine how much food, clothing, and shelter this would buy for the homeless. Our society is completely fooked in its priorities.

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Armsbend

Then they’d still sleep under the bridge on Freedom Parkway and throw trash all over the goddamned place.

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Sally Bowls

As an Atlantan-ish, you also could have gone with “be under the bridge until they burn the bridge down.”

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Armsbend

Too true friend!

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BalsBigBrother

Love playing it but cannot stand watching it. Though given the above news its seem popular enough so good for them /shrugs

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Boom

What.

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Randy Savage

lol

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Loopy

I am taking this as good news. This says that the league is popular and profitable enough to justify a price hike for new franchises. I definitely enjoyed the first season of the league, and the viewership on Twitch and other platforms seemed to reciprocate as well.

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Robert Mann

Meh. E-sports. *scoffs* If people wish to waste their money on things less entertaining and fun than actually doing… *considers* then I guess it makes sense in a way. After all, that’s regular sports too. Amazing that people are so eager to watch other people have fun, rather than to just go have fun, but I guess I see nothing wrong with it.

That said, I still do not see any appeal.

borghive
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borghive

My little cousin is 23, doesn’t watch any TV, pretty much just watches Twitch for his entertainment. So, I’m not surprised the popularity of E-sports. A lot of kids in his age bracket love E-sports.

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Robert Mann

Aye, not surprised… but I seriously don’t get how it entertains. Just to each their own, I guess.

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Armsbend

For the same reason someone might watch ‘The Big Bang Theory’ and think to themselves, “What half-wit watches this shit on a regular basis?”

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Sally Bowls

It definitely correlates to age

NEWZOO_Popularity_of_Esports_and_Sports_by_Age.png
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Loopy

It’s not like we’re watching our neighbours playing pick-up football. These are players who are immensely more talented and skilled than your regular joe. How would it not be entertaining to watch them play and see the tactics they use and their quick responses. This applies to both regular sports and e-sports.

The entertainment factor is very much present there, don’t dismiss it.

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Robert Mann

You can get a similar experience to most pro-sports at the school level, even highschool. Without the cost, drama, and with generally better officiating. Although, to be honest I’d rather get a group together and play. No matter how terrible anyone might be, the game will be far more fun than I have ever had watching one. Yes, I’ve tried watching, and it’s really not that great.

As to e-sports and their tactics/responses… I can imagine very little that would be more dull. I might enjoy the moment with friends playing and me present, but that’s not because I’m watching gameplay (and there are some pretty solid moments there.) It’s because of the other part, friends present.

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Loopy

As you mentioned in your previous comment, to each their own. I personally enjoy watching the pros because i’m learning about tactics behind their decisions, which i attempt to replicate in my gameplay. This makes me improve and allows me to progress through the ranked system. So i’m getting both the benefit of education as well as entertainment.

Not much to really “understand” here, for some it’s enjoyable, for others it’s not.

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Sorenthaz

Glad to hear it’s been doing well so far. It’s been regularly getting around 130k views on Twitch which is fairly close to the numbers LoL’s NALCS pulls in. And it’s been pretty much creaming the EULCS numbers but the EU side of LoL has been a sinking ship for awhile now with how much Riot neglects the EU scene.

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sauldo

130k views may be impressive by Twitch’s standards but this is still a drop in an ocean when compared to mainstream sport events, especially when considering the money invested in that Overwatch league. Makes me wonder if this esport thing isn’t a little overblown.

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Sorenthaz

Well keep in mind Twitch isn’t the only channel used and they have I believe an in-game revenue stream from the team skins and such. Plus sponsorship is a big revenue source as well.

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Armsbend

If you watch old pro football reels from 70 years ago they are sparsely populated in tiny less than high school stadiums. I think it cost a nickel or so to get in.

The reason people are willing to take a risk on ESports is FOMO. Fear Of Missing Out.

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Sally Bowls

Exactly. There was an ATVI earnings call where Bobby K talked about his friend Robert Kraft saying buying the Patriots was his best investment and pushing the “get in on the ground floor” aspect of OL.

And it is financial as well as emotional: If you make ten risky $20M investments and eight fail completely, one is worth $15M, and one is worth $500M then the profit is 8*0+1*15+1*500-20*20=$315M.

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Armsbend

If I had a few $100M I’d be talking to a finance guy right now about bringing a team to the south. Sadly I’m only sitting on $85M in liquid cash and it doesn’t fit my structure at the moment.

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Sally Bowls

http://www.espn.com/esports/story/_/id/22132542/overwatch-league-outperforms-thursday-night-football-livestream-opening-day
It is not there yet. But business people who look at the first and second derivatives of the markets would find a lot to prefer esports over tv sports.