EA suffers major data breach while CDPR says its own breach targeted more than just source code

    
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“It’s been a bad day for security in games,” MOP’s Andy sighed in team chat earlier today, and unfortunately, he’s quite right.

For starters, EA admitted that it was hacked earlier this week; the hackers apparently nabbed source code for multiple games, including FIFA, and the Frostbite engine. EA says “no player data was accessed” and that there’s no “risk to player privacy,” but the potential for hacks is now sky-high.

Meanwhile, CD Projekt Red took the opportunity to update the industry on the status of its data breach from earlier this year, when hackers stole source code for multiple studio titles, including Cyberpunk 2077, and attempted to ransom it back. The company now says that the breach may have included staff data as well.

Finally, even random profile images on Steam are apparently a vector for malware. A bad day for security indeed.

Source: CNN, CDPR, ThreatPost. Cheers, Mark.
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Ardra Diva

call me crazy but I would have to believe that user data is far more valuable than source code. Consider what can be accomplished with either one. Having the Frostbite code doesn’t mean you wouldn’t have a herculean task making something out of it. Having usernames, passwords, and especially payment data is pure gold in the criminal underworld.

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Jon Wax

Welp with frostbite up for grabs gotta say that kinda kills my interest in bf6.

Should be just enough time for the aimbots and crap to get completed before bf6 retails

People suck

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Blake

Yep, that’ll make BF6 a cheaters paradise for sure. Five was already bad enough, this’ll make six that much worse.

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traja

Creating cheats is very easy so I don’t think that there is much use for the engine source code. What would make a difference is the source code of their anti cheat system.

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Schmidt.Capela

Depends on whether the game has built-in anti-cheat measures. For example, Animal Crossing and Elite Dangerous both encrypt in memory certain values of interest to cheaters.

It’s still not unsurmountable, mind; anyone with a working knowledge of assembly should be able to break through that added protection. But it does hinder, or even blocks, the common script kiddies from messing with the protected values.

(Why not apply that protection to everything: because it makes accessing those values far slower. If you have just a few protected values the extra delay won’t matter, but if you protect everything you could seriously slow down the game.)

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angrakhan

Pretty soon the only way you’re going to be able to keep data secure is to have it completely offline from any sort of public network, and only move the bits you need online… manually… when you need it. Hackers suck.

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Eliandal

Entirely possible! Having certain information only accessible by certain people is also a possibility. It is interesting, that current thinking is that both of these breaches may have been .. facilitated.. internally

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Jon Wax

Just rumor milling but I think the recent data hints that the people who suffer from “Havana syndrome” or whatever it’s called are experiencing side effects of some sort of radio wave hack attempt.

Somebody might have figured out a way to make even offline data vulnerable

Turing fail
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Turing fail