Gamescom 2021 touts over 70 devs and publishers, highlights panels on education and societal change

    
26

While this year’s Gamescom is going to be different as it’s forced to go all-digital due to COVID-19, the event itself is going to be no small affair. The event’s latest presser touts over 70 developers and publishers are participating in the event and promises a whole lot of things for players and industry types to look forward to.

The whole shebang starts with an opening show hosted by Geoff Keighley that will feature more than 30 games alone, which kicks off on Wednesday, August 25th, at 8:00 p.m. EDT. The rest of the Gamescom weekend will feature other trailer reveals, announcement analyses, an indie games showcase, and gameplay deep-dives at Gamescom’s English language studio.

In addition to the usual game reveal hullabaloo, Gamescom will also feature a number of digital panels that focus in on the games industry as a tool for education, environmental change, and society improvement. Panel topics include using technology and its relationship to healing, how the games industry can help restore nature, technology’s impact on things like science and the arts, and how driving sims have real-world applications among other topics.

sources: press releases
Advertisement

No posts to display

26
LEAVE A COMMENT

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Dystopiq

That’s all great but maybe they should focus on the rampant sexism, harassment, assault, and abuse currently present at their companies. Or the fact that a lot of these companies outsource development to third parties in countries with low CoL where the workers get even more abused than here.

Fisty
Reader
Fisty

I won’t take the bait and instead say a lot of those games in the hype trailer look pretty cool! I will probably have this on in the background and watch it like I usually do.

Reader
draugris

“the games industry as a tool for education, environmental change, and society improvement.”

How about you guys focus on making interesting and fun to play games, instead of preaching.

Reader
Utakata

I’m not sure they’re preaching anything. Rather focusing on things to probably make themselves look good in the PR as opposed to real change and game content…

…this makes me think though, if I planned to hold a work shop on collective bargaining here, I would likely be shown the door. Being “one with the environment” instead just reeks of all talk, no real action and much of nothing…which just seems the way they want it.

Reader
draugris

Yeah maybe, i also think that PR and bending the knee to the current Zeitgeist to make some money is an issue.

Reader
Utakata

They’re not bending their knee to the “spirit of the age”…or least I don’t see them adorning M*GA caps spewing out Gomer Gate dog whistles either, lol. Rather they are appealing to broader market, which is what you expect they should do in padding their bottom line. (Also see: Rules of Acquisition #34 & 35.) But their sincerity for real change ends there. And that’s my biggest complaint in all this.

Reader
Vanquesse V

Are you saying that we should get rid of free speech? That game devs shouldn’t be allowed to tell whatever story they want? Or what exactly do you mean by saying that they shouldn’t “preach”?

Reader
Arktouros

Hearing from a group of people (game development companies) who have repeatedly proven they have very little actual interest in these kinds of broad topics and largely do so as virtue signaling or “preachy” manner. Like I can’t honestly count the number of times I’ve seen or read articles or announcements about commitments to battle toxicity meanwhile literally zero companies have done the most basic thing and simply hired staff to help moderate their game. So while they get up on a soapbox and talk about the problems of today and that they want to address those issues they’re generally only willing to do so if it costs them basically nothing.

Reader
Vanquesse V

No. They are willing to do things if they believe it to be a net gain. That’s an extremely important distinction because it means that by either protest or by research they can be convinced to change course.
Will this mean that ActiBlizz does a face turn? Very likely no, but they aren’t the whole industry and I’ll happily accept small changes for the better over no changes.
My hope is that these panels etc will inspire indies and hopefully they’ll grow to be more than that over time.
If you click the link you’ll also notice that most of those speakers are not attached to a AAA publisher, it’s researchers, teachers, NGOs or indie devs and I don’t think it’s fair to blame them for the faults of AAA.

Reader
Arktouros

Net gain to large AAA developers only means profitability. If they can implement something on the side that costs them nothing or very little (IE: trying to use machine learning) then great.

However if you can’t even get AAA to get on board with your panel then it’s basically doomed from the get go because it’s the only viable way to reach large amount of people. If a guy can go be a raging asshole in Call of Duty then entirely ignore your indie game that isn’t going to really fix or change anything. It’s like those ads telling people to reduce their cabon footprint when like 70% of the world’s pollution or whatever is made by large companies. Oh well I did my 0.0000000001% towards making things better.

This is all fluff and preachy nonsense that will amount to nothing tangible. It’s people who can imagine a better world but have no functional route how to get to what they’ve imagined.

Reader
Vanquesse V

Here’s the thing: game dev is cyclical. indies show up, have success, grow bigger, get absorbed into larger publishers, then at some point the publisher fucks up and people leave and start over from the bottom again.
So changing the outlook of indies will, over time, affect AAA. Will it fix everything? Not even remotely, but hopefully it’ll make a difference until enough people are sick enough of the current situation for actual, permanent change to happen.

I also don’t think it’s fair to give these people shit because they *are* the ones trying to change the industry. There are plenty of very obvious targets to direct frustration at, but these people aren’t it.

Reader
draugris

I do not like if real world politics are involved with gaming. I also do not like when game companies try to shove their morales down my throat through their games. So developing games with the morale index finger is what i mean by preaching.

Reader
Vanquesse V

so you don’t like metal gear solid, final fantasy 7, bioshock, persona or fallout?
Because that’s just naming a few mainstream games that are *very* political.

Reader
draugris

I said “real world politics” ….

Reader
Vanquesse V

lol, so the military industrial complex, nuclear proliferation, climate change, imperialism, racism, collectivism and activism are not applicable to real world politics?

Reader
draugris

Lol, i don’t know where you live, but i do not live in a post nuclear fall out world.

Reader
Vanquesse V

Bless your ignorant heart for missing some of the most heavy handed preaching in the history of gaming.

Reader
draugris

Well i have the impression that you are the ignorant here. I do not have to defend what kind of games i like and what i don’t like.

Reader
Utakata

They’re not asking you to vote for someone or some party. So it’s not “real world politics” by any stretch.

All games and their developers do impose some sort of moral compass within it though. Whether it’s through their Terms of Use, storyline, Codes of Conduct, etc. If you don’t want that, stop playing games and go do something else. Preferably something that’s not hosted by other parties outside of yourself. /shrug

Reader
draugris

Well thanks, but I surely do not need you to tell me what I do with my spare time or what games I have to like. You also do not get the point. Everybody has their personal view on morales but not everybody is so arrogant to think that their view on the world is so important that they feel the need to preach that through their product.

Reader
Utakata

I wasn’t telling you anything, I was simply suggesting there, bub. You do what you want with your time. I don’t really care, lol.

But since you are further going down that rabbit hole of the disingenuous, I’ll leave you to your reality of invisible “preaching” products and “real” world politics, perceived, imagined or otherwise. And move on…

One pill makes you larger, and one pill makes you small…

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

What ‘morales’?

Reader
Utakata

…the ones the OP apparently disagrees with. If the OP agreed with them, they’d unlikely be morals. o.O

Reader
Dystopiq

All politics are real world politics and they’ve been in games for decades. Get over it.

Reader
Utakata

“In addition to the usual game reveal hullabaloo, Gamescom will also feature a number of digital panels that focus in on the games industry as a tool for education, environmental change, and society improvement. Panel topics include using technology and its relationship to healing, how the games industry can help restore nature, technology’s impact on things like science and the arts, and how driving sims have real-world applications among other topics.”

I mean this all sounds nice and that, but unless they start to address the industry’s nature to be profit driven…this is all for naught and fluff. Also see: Roblox. /sigh

Reader
Arktouros

games industry as a tool for education, environmental change, and society improvement

JonahJamesonLaugh.gif